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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 028. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/27.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 028. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/27

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 028, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/27.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 028
Transcript history as the turning point in the struggle against Communist totalitarianism. The design and plan of the Kremlin, thwarted in Western Europe, was now challenged and defeated on the battlefield in Korea. Collective security had met its first test and it succeeded. The free nations stood together. I call to your attention the meeting of the Communist chieftians in Moscow in September and October of 1952. It was here that Joseph Stalin outlined the change of Soviet tactics and strategy. The program of open violence and aggression was to be replaced by a policy of political maneuver, economic warfare, stepped-up subversion, and dividing the United States from her allies. I recommend to the attention of every participant in this conference a careful study of lhe 19th Annual Communist Partv Conference at Mosrow in the fall of 1952. You will note that it was timed to take place during our presidential election. We were immersed in domestic politics. I regret to say that far too little attention was given to this important meeting by those presently responsible for our foreign policy. The tip-oft of the present Soviet peace offensive is to be found in the proceedings of this conference. Even Malenkov was unveiled at this meeting. General Zhukov came back into the limelight. A weakness in our foreign policy is the failure on the part of Congress and appropriate committees of Congress to carefully study the strategy and tactics of Soviet foreign policy. We are always being caught off lease, thereby placing us on the defensive. We seem to spend far too much time in counterattack rather than in planned programmed political offensive. 1 have urged emd recommended that a special subcommittee be appointed to maintain constant review and study in this field. Likewise. Senate,r Mansfield, of Montana, has sponsored a resolution to provide a Joint Committee on Central Intelligence. The recent United Nations Commemorative Conference at San Francisco revealed the weaknesses and strengths of our foreign policy. Much that I have said here today was underscored and verified by the series of addresses delivered by UN delegates on the historic occasion of the commemorative conference, li weis my privilege to attend those meetings. 1 digress to say 1 was the only member of Congress to attend this conference. This fact within itself reveals a weakness in our foreign policy. Members of Congress should do more than issue statements on foreign policy. We must actively participate, whenever it is possible, in the meetings or conferences that lead to thc discussion, review, or formulation of our foreign poliev. If our foreign policy is everybody's business, then indeed it is above all the business of the members of Congress. I left the UN conference convinced that we had won our case against the Kremlin in the court of world public opinion. Even the hardbitten, disciplined Soviet delegates could not ignore the climate of political friendship and association of free nations. The address of Mr. Molotov was an unintentional testimonial to the solidarity of free nations. Every point thai Mr. Molotov emphasized related directly to what we had clone or had not done. It was clear from bis speech that NATO is successful, that the Soviet has given up in Western Europe. It was evident that our foreign policy ibis peisi decade has. in the main, bean effective, particularly in those areas where we have an intimate knowledge and understanding of the political and economic forces. The most significant observation to be made about the United Nations meeting was the unity of free nations despite all of the Soviet tactics to divide us and create distrust. You may recall that the address of Mr. Molotov was carefully analyzed and answered by our Secretary of State. Mr. Dulles did a good job in refuting Molotov's arguments. If 1 were to have judged these two addresses as a debate I am sure that Mr. Dulles would have won. But there is no reward in debate at this time. We bene edready won the argument, but we have not won the cold war. Regretfully, we have permitted ourselves to gel bogged down in proving the fallacy and duplicity of Soviet pronouncements. Wc have won this argument, yes, won it over and over again. We win it in every United Nations session. It is one thing to prove the Soviets to be wrong, and yet another thing to prove ourselves to be righl. The margin of clear-cut victory lies with the new, the underdeveloped, and the yet uncommitted nalions. It is jusl in this area lhat the policy of the present administration is weak, confused, and at times petty. Let me explain what I mean by relating Ibis world struggle to the American political scene. You do not win elections by continuing to convince the convinced, or by discrediting an opponent already discredited. We in American politics understand il is the independent vote that determines the outcome. You gain that vole bv standing on principle and coming forth with a program that has a wider appeal than just to the partisans you have already won. To put it another way. I have a feeling that we bene become more concerned about the importance of exposing Soviet tactics than we have of expounding a dynamic and constructive American foreign policy. One- could not help but sense at the San Francisco United Nations Conference that people were looking to lhe I nited Stales to offer inspiration on a new level, to emphasize our positive goals for an honorable peace, and strengthening of underdeveloped areas —this was not done. The world is hungry for peace. The Soviet talks peace. They seem to sense world public opinion. To be sure, the Soviet is not able to convince the leaders of the nations that their program for peace is honorable and true. These leaders, however, are always subject to public opinion of their respective countries, and I noticed that Mr. Molotov again and again appealed over the governments to the people. He subtly intimated that the leaders of the Western nations were blocking Soviet efforts for peace. He attempted to drive a wedge between the governments and the people. He identified governments with the United States. He identified peoples with the Soviet Union. Soviet propaganda has never convinced delegates to the United Nations, but it has been effective in the villages, cities, and rural areas of countries that have delegates in the United Nations. The Soviet propaganda repeats the word "people" again and again, and regretfully the statements of our present diplomatic officials reveal that we are permitting our diplomacy to become the special privilege of the elite—of the diplomat—or even more unfortunate, sacrificing sound policy for domestic political advantage. We must remember that there has always been and still continues to be a natural suspicion on the part of people everywhere over lhe so-called "art of diplomacy." Too many times in the history of the world, people have been deceived bv llieir diplomats. There have been too many secret agreements, too much du- plieitv. and Machiavellian expediency. The Soviet propagandists seem to sense this natural suspicion by people in free countries of their State Department and foreign ministers. Therefore, Mr. Molotov called upon the people to join with the Soviel in seeking peace—peace on Soviet terms. Now let us not underestimate the impact of this carefullv conceived strategy. It could very well be dangerously effective, particularly if we permit it to go unnoticed or unchallenged. You do not successfully challenge this political strategy by men-b pointing out that it is a fraud. More m-e-ds to be done. Surely the represent ' tives of democratic republics and free nations should be the first to appeal to lb,- people, to take their case lo the people, to interpret their policy in language the people can understand. Governments come and go, but the people go on forever. A successful foreign policy is one lhal has lhe support of the people back home as we'll eis the acceptance of the people abroad lo whom it is directed. A weakness in our foreign policy is that loo much attention is paid to the embassies and the foreign ministers and too little attention to the workers in the feu lories, tee tbe natives Page 26 FACTS FORUM NEWS, Ocrci&er, 1955
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