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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
File 023
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 023. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/22.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 023. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/22

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 023, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/22.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 023
Transcript ^^^^^^^^mmmmmmmmm^. -Wide World Photo In 19S3 West German shipyards produced over 10 per cent of the world's ships, making Germany the second-ranking shipbuilding nation of the world. tarians. as we used it against the Nazis, the confidence which the German "common man" has in us will fade way. For the average German has learned from experience a basic truth which neither our liberal or conservative intellectuals know, namely, that the Communists do not advance from strength to strength b\ their "power of attraction,'1 but by the fear they instill of the terrible reprisals which await all who oppose them once they come to power. Thev are winning the struggle for the world because more and more people in both Asia and Europe have become distrustful of our determination to stand by those who stand by us. Fear of death or slavery for everyone who has espoused tbe cause of freedom, together with genuine lack of confidence in America's willingness to Use our power to defeat Communism, is the reason why we are losing allies and failing to influence people everywhere in the world. A German friend of mine, who went into exile in America rather than submit lo the Hitler regime, and who is today a correspondent of the Hamburg newspaper Die Zeit, told me in June, while visiting the United States, that one rea- Son why his people have not. as yet, been too seriously affected by our policy of retreat and appeasement in the Pen iln is the- influence of the British press in Germany. Paradoxically, the fact that the British have been denouncing America's ssive" Far Eastern policy, or our refusal to come to terms with the Chinese Communists, has, he said, "kept German faith in the U. S. alive." This German journalist, whose name is von /wills- dorff, was particularly anxious io interview Knowland because tin- California Senator is held in the highest esteem in Germany for his uncompromising "stop the Communists" attitude. PACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955 As illustrated by this incident, neither the administration nor the American pub- lie is well informed as to the real opinion of the peoples of Europe and Asia. Most of our newspaper correspondents, columnists, and radio or TV commentators tend to report as "European opinion" either their own prejudices, of the information they obtain from U. S. embassy handouts, or from the British and French press. Few of them speak any language except English, or at best French, and many of them owe their jobs to the reputations they made during thc war. and immediate postwar periods when it was popular to be pink, and when to be anti-Communist was tantamount to being pro-Nazi, and therefore the sure road to ruin or oblivion. The situation with regard to reporting on Germany is the worst of all. For here the habit was formed, during the long period of occupation, of relying on the I . S. military government, and subsequently on the I'. S. High Commissioner's Information Office, for all news and views. And even after American correspondents in Germany began to establish some contacts with the people, they usually met only the representatives of the Bonn government, or of lhe news- papers and business circles which had unconditionally surrendered to the official American point of view. Dr. Adenauer is no quisling. He has been God's gift to Germany and to us. He has brought his country back into the community of free Western nations not only by bis firm guidance of his people, bul also by bis defense of their inalienable rights in bis dealing wilh the occupation powers. Nevertheless, it is unfortunately true that, owing to the control originally exercised over the German press and radio by the occupying powers; as also to the subsidies given to the German newspapers approved of by McCloy and his "liberal" advisers, and to the dependence of the German authorities em our goodwill or support; the only voices to which we have lent an ear are echoes of our own, or. to be more precise, the only German "opinion" of which we are cognizant is lhat which repeats the views held by the dominant forces in lhe United States' administration and press. GERMANY A BARGAINING COUNTER Were this not so, we should reali/e thai Soviet Russia is now winning a measure of success in her efforts to wean the German people from our side, by pla\ ing upon their fears that we are now ei- ready to buy peace in our time, at almosl anv price, as we were to embrace Communisl Russia as an ally in order to defeat the Axis powers. Hence, the sen- sitivilv displayed by Dr. Adenauer when Presidenl Eisenhower, at his May 18th puss conference, "indicated keen inter- e-I in the suggestion that a series of neutralized states between East and West might be created in Europe." Subse- quently the Chancellor was assured by Mr. Dulles that the President had not meant to express approval of the Soviet suggestion of a reunited but neutral Germany. But the harm had been done. The President's "off the cuff" remarks had stimulated the latent neutralist sentiment in Germany which stems in part from the fear that adherence to NATO condemns the East Germans to perpetual Communist rule; and in part from the doubts as to whether the United States, at French insistence, may not come to an agreement with the Soviet Union at the expense of all Germany. It has not been only the Social Demo- i rats who have wished to explore the possibilities of German reunification through neutrality. Last year Dr. Bruen- ing and Dr. Luther, both of whom were chancellors of the Weimar Republic, came out in favor of negotiations wilh Moscow. As Dr. Adenauer himself observed at the Brussels conference last year, "In a race for Russian favors. Western Germany, not France, is the likeliest winner." It is therefore hardly surprising that some Germans should conclude that their country stands to gain more by making her own bargain with Russia, than by letting the Western powers, which show signs of being dominated by appeasement influences, use Germany as a bargaining counter. During the first years of the occupation the Germans were given ample reason to suppose that we had no objection to communism so long as it did not menace us. U. S. military government, acting on instructions from Washington, treated the Communists as Democrats and went so far as lo give them leading positions on newspapers and radio, as denazification officials, and in local governmenl. Allied Control Council Law \e,. 4. drawn up by Marshal Zhukov. forbade the Germans to publish or read anything "directed against" any of the occupation powers. There were even cases of Germans imprisoned in the Western zones for having spoken out against Soviet atrocities in the East. It was not until after the blockade of Berlin in 1948 that a radical change be- iiaii to be made in our official attitude leeward the Communists and in our treatment of the German population. An end to the dismantlement of German factories, and cessation of the stupidity of shipping arms manufacturing equipment lo Russia, came only in 1949-1950 at the insistence of the U. S. Senate. And it was not until after the Korean War began that we ceased to treat the Germans as a conquered nation and came to consider them as allies. All in all. there was a bitter truth behind the joke I often heard in Germany in 1948, to the effect that the Germans should be grateful to Stalin Page 21
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