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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
File 021
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 021. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/20.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 021. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/20

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 021, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/20.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 021
Transcript ■I H ■■■■■■■ ? protection hitherto afforded her by the presence of American soldiers on her territory, and be deprived of the substantial benefit of our armed services, dollar expenditures and the "offshore pun liases" which now lake lhe place of Marshall Plan, or EGA aid. in bolstering the national economies of our European allies: in addition. Austria s population of seven million, living on a territory about the same size as Maine, and possessed of few natural resources, is to pay 320 million dollars lo Russia during the next decade, after having already been looted of some 500 million dollars worth of industrial equipment and oil by lhe Russians since 1945. The .'-520 million dollars which Austria s seven million people are to pay is lo consist of 10 million tons of oil to be delivered from wells which tbe Russians have already almost depleted, and of 150 million dollars worth of industrial goods to be banded over lo the Soviet 1 nion within six years. If the Austrian people are also to redeem the Danubian -hipping seized by the Russians as "war booty," they will have lo pay an addi- tional indemnity of 20 million dollars. A HUGE RANSOM All in all, it is difficult lo understand why President Eisenhower should have hailed lhe Austrian Treaty as the first sign eel ei new dawn, since Austria, which wei- supposed to be a "liberated" country, has actually fared worse than I" inland which dared to light the Soviel colossus, Finland's four million people paid an indemnity of 227 million dollars, as compared wilh lhe lotal of past and future payments of 1,21) million dollars squeezed out of Austria's seven million people. Moreover, although Finland lost some territory, she was not occupied and looted b\ the Red Army. The price of freedom certainly comes high in dealing with Moscow. The Aus- Irians will have to work for ten long years in return for their precarious liberty and independence, and their "free' service may well prove more profitable to the Muscovite Empire than the forced labor of its satellites. The East European countries, delivered over to the Communists at Teheran, Yalta and Potsdam, having already been stripped of the removable wealth which Moscow could conveniently remove, and slave labor being notoriously Unproductive, it may be that they now Constitute more of a drain than an asset to the Kremlin, in view of thc high cost of terrorizing all the people all the time. So it is not inconceivable lhat Moscow should decide to let them go free for a huge ransom, while retaining the whip- band bj the presence of the Red Army "ii iheir borders. It i-- also possible lhat the junta which ne,w rules over the Com- inilni-l w,erlil would feel mine' secure with a Russian frontier to defend instead ol a weak front of subject peoples who cannot be expected to fight against the West with any enthusiasm. The Kremlin may have learnt from Hitler's experience with Italy, that weak allies arc worse than useless and had better stay neutral. Fortunately, it has been proved thai llie rulers of Russia are often even less intelligent than those of the free world. So it is possible lo hope that they will fail to take advantage of their opportune to win both material, political and military advantages by cutting their losses in Eastern Europe. Centuries ago there was a popular jingle in England which ran: In matters of commerce the fault of the Dutch is giving too little and asking too much. Transposed into the political and military sphere this perfectly describes tbe ''fault" of the Soviet government. Today, bv asking loo much, the Communists may fail lo sell us tin- idea of a "neutral' block of buffer slates stretching from .Austria to Scandinavia in return for the removal of U. S. forces from Europe or our retreat behind the Pyrenees. However, lhe rulers of the Communist world have proved themselves very skillful in getting others to pay them for doing what ihey are compelled to do. as, for instance, when we gave them eleven billion dollars worth of aid to fight the war they were forced to fight by Nazi Germany's attack. Today they need a breathing space and may be looking for a way to make a profit out of necessity by inducing us lo retreat in return for tbe withdrawals which are forced upon them by their economic and political difficulties. To judge by the altitude of the Western governments and press, they ina\ vet succeed in getting the I nited States to compensate thein for doing what they must do to survive. Even the Washington Post recognizes the fact that the Soviet government has "three constant aims: to neutralize a united Germany, to paralyze NATO and force the United States out of Europe." And although their voices are suppressed, by our optimistic President, or by our wishful thinking press, the Pentagon undoubtedly contains intelligent olfi- cers who realize that the most vital concern of our enemies is to win a period of peace and security until such time as their air force and atomic potential equals ours, and they shall have developed long range atomic rockets which would render the United States as indefensible as the Soviet Empire is today. In a dispatch from Paris dated June 23 last, William H. Stoneman reported to lhe Chicago Daily News that "Western air force higher ups" were explaining that Russia's desire for "peace was due to her now being "virtually wide open to attack." He quoted them as saying that American air bases in Africa and Turkey, the United Kingdom, our own territory and the Pacific islands, constituted a "vast arc, over which attacks might be expected" making the defense of the Soviet Empire virtually impossible at the present time. As against its vulnerability, they said, the U. S. "is only directly exposed along a much shorter arc, the one covering the Arctic approaches." But, they warned, our present great advantage will be annulled once the Soviel I nion slaves have perfected the "intercontinental ballistic missile" against which there is no defense. lb-re we come back to the importance of Germany to the scientific, mililarv and economic requirements of the Communist empire if it is ever to match or surpass our power. RUSSIA'S ECONOMIC PROBLEMS All the potentialities of the Soviet military apparatus will be of little worth if the tremendous effort required to prepare for the conquest of America leads to a breakdown of the Soviet economy. The Russians are inured to working long hours for a bare subsistence, but even they cannot live without food, which is now being produced in lesser quantity per head of the population than in Czar- ist times. Nor do the spectacular suc- —Wide World Photo Signing of the Austrian State Treaty of Independence in Belvedere Palace, Vienna, May, 19S5, giving freedom to Austria after seventeen years of foreign occupation. 1955 FACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955 Page 19
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