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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
File 020
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 020. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/19.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 020. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/19

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 020, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/19.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript HI Can We Be Sure of Germany? Bv FREDA UTLEY SOON after the Bolsheviks seized power, and while it was still uncertain whether they could hold on to it, Lenin said that he would risk all their gains in Russia for the hope of a Communist revolution in Germany. Those were the days when Communists were Marxists who believed that socialism could be established only by the proletariat of an advanced industrial country, and that, therefore, backward agrarian Russia must be joined by Germany if "the revolution" were to achieve its aims. After Lenin's death Stalin forced his party to believe, or pretend to believe, that "socialism in one country" was possible, even in Russia, provided that the Communist dictatorship were ruthless enough to impose it against the opposition of the great majority of the people, and to carry out a program of forced industrialization, at a cost of more blood, sweat and tears than any government ruling by consent of the governed could possibly have contemplated. Nevertheless, the Kremlin's policies continued to be influenced by the belief that the union of German scientific and technical knowledge, skilled labor, discipline and organizational genius, with Russia's natural resources and manpower, was the only possible combination of forces which could ensure the defeat of the "capitalist imperialist" West. Thus, both before and after Hitler came to power, as again today, Moscow has sought by one means or another for an alliance, or partnership, or understanding with Germany. Now that atomic power has become the key to world domination, the reasons for this unchanging aim of Communist policy have become more compulsive than ever before. As Dr. Medford Evans points out in his book. The Secret Wnr jor the A- Bomb, it is unlikely that Soviet Russia on her own can ever develop and operate an atomic energy project comparable to our own because: The most striking difference between American and Soviet accomplishment appears in certain industries ... requisite to a viahle atomic energy project. These industries include the electronics and electric appliance group, lhe telephone industry, the automobile industry, the chemical industries, including petroleum, anil the metallurgical and metal industries, especially non-ferrous. It is not unreasonable to assume a significant positive correlation between a nation's atomic potential and its actual performance in the telephone industry. Since Germany is second only to the United States in the electronics and electric appliance group of industries, and used to lead the world in the chemical industry, it would be logical to suppose that Moscow is today, more than ever before, determined to win Germany over to her side; or somehow or other, induce the Germans to work with or for them. Herein lies the real significance of the Austrian Treaty, suddenly concluded bv Moscow after years of stalling, and of the invitation extended to Dr. Adenauer to come to Moscow for negotiations. By "freeing" Austria on condition that she become "neutral" and also pay enough to Russia for the next ten years to put her "in bock" to the Soviet power, the masterminds in the Kremlin have not only weakened NATO by cutting off Italy from direct communication via the Brenner Pass with the American and British forces in Germany, they also served notice on the Germans that they too could become united and freed from all occupation forces, provided that they agree not to contribute armed forces to the Western alliance, and to render economic aid to the Soviet power. Dr. Adenauer has felt it necessary to warn his countrymen that the freedom from Russian occupation won bv Austria at the cost of a huge indemnity payment, as well as by a pledge of "neutral ity," does not offer a parallel opportunity to tbe Germans to ransom their enslaved countrymen in East Germany. Unfortunately, President Eisenhower is not so well informed as to the underlying pur pose of Soviet policy as the Chancelloi of the German Federal Republic. This was made all too clear on April 28th when the President at his press conference, cited Russia's "sudden" readiness to conclude a treaty with Austria as evidence for his "feeling" that "things are on the upswing." THE KREMLIN'S "NEW LOOK" A more realistic appraisal of the Kremlin's new look in foreign policy suggests a very different conclusion to the optimistic one drawn by the White House and the State Department. Namely lhal lhe Kremlin has decided that the policy now most likely to succeed in breaking up the Western alliance is to offer peace to all, and freedom and unity to the Germans, provided that we pay tribute lo Russia in one form or another, and also make substantial military concessions to ensure the "security" of the Soviet Empire in Europe and Asia. In tlie final outcome it is usually America which pays reparations b\ giving to others the means with which to [iay them. This is notably the case a- regards Austria, which afler having been saved from starvation and put back on its feet by one and a half billion dollars of American aid, will undoubtedly now require more help from us in order to pay tin- huge price exacted by Moscow for letting her go free. Alternatively, she will eventually be forced into the Communist camp by her economic difficulties. By the terms of tin- Austrian Treaty drawn up by lhe USSR, anil joyfully signed by lhe United Stales. Britain and France, this little "liberated" country will not only cease- lo enjoy the mililarv Page 18 FACTS FORUM NEWS, October. 1955
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