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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
File 019
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 019. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/18.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 019. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/18

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 019, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/18.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript •---*sTZ&4Hki&*'*, ven't looked my view at e law is dif- ,f the Presi- le. or in the (MADIGAN) : Can we now trust Russia, in your opinion? No, no, I don't think we can. I think lhe Russian objectives have nol changed one iola; their objectives arc slill fundamentally world communism—to communize lhe world. I think llicy are in a period in which they use blandishments and put on their besl and most friendly face. My own per- scineil view is that they are playing for lime and not necessarily playing for a genuine peaceful settlement of world tensions, but bv tlle same token, perhaps the lime which may be obtained here by these mutual discussions may also work to our benefit. 11 mav. in thc long run. work more toward peace than against it. (DOHERTY): Senator, to get back lo President Eisenhower's disarmament proposal. Even though you claim this could be done by tbe President under bis authority as Commander-in-Chief, and through the departments, can you conceive of his taking an> such dreislic step as this without consulting Congress? I think it is very possible that the President may do as he lias done frequently in thc past—ask for consultation with lhe Congress and perhaps an expression of their views on the mailer if. as, and when il ever may come to an agreement. (DOHERTY) : Ry that. Senator, do you mean having -elect groups of congressmen of both Houses and both parties being summoned to the While House and told what is going to happen? The President may continue that bipartisan method or he mighl ask. as he did in connection wilh Thailand and the Pescadores, the view nr lhe cooperation of the Congress in the mailer. I don't know whal method he would choose lo follow. (MADIGAN): Senator, could wc move lo the Ear Easl for a moment? Almost immediately at the conclusion of tbe Geneva meeting, the tension throughout tbe world centered ageiin on the Red China area with some foreboding that trouble will break oul there. Proposals have been made that we meet in face-to-f;ice conference with Red China al the foreign minister level within lhe next three, four, five, or six months. Would you favor sucb a meeting? At this particular moment, unless there were some more concrete proposal for an honorable and ei reliable peace in the Far Ea-I. in which the good faith of the Reds had been demonstrated, I would approach the idea of any such conference wilh misgivings. Al this present moment. 1 can sec nothing thai could 'ne accomplished excepl something that is adverse to the free world. In six months or a year from now. I mighl believe that the climate were sucb lhat we might approach such a conference. (MADIGAN): What would be lhe expressions of sin- e-erily lhat could come from Red C.biiui which would make you agree? Name Iwo or three things Ihey should ilo immediately. I woulel say among a greal number would lie the release of lhe wen prisoners which they hold, lhe restitution for the criminal acts of many kinds which they have performed, the willingness, by demonstration, to conform to the moral principles which the free world believes to be sound, the keeping of agreements, emd all those things. (MADIGAN)! Do you know if that is the general feeling of the Republiceen leadership ill the Senate? 1 eun on tlle Policy Committee in the Senate and that par- ticular matter has not been one for serious discussion up Until this moment. (MADIGAN) : Would you vigorously oppose it in the Policy Committee in cei-c il should come up for di — eussion? If il were proposed at this lime to hold a discussion with 'he Red Chinese leaders officially which would be teinta- uiount to recognition of them. I would not be in favor of 'I because I don'l ihink they have demonstrated their good faith. (MADIGAN): If Nationalist China were allowed to sit in on a three-way conversation, would thai change your viewpoint? Red China, Nationalist China and the United States? At this moment. I could nol conceive of anything to be gained by bringing Red Chinese leaders into a conference with the Nationalisl Chinese and ourselves. We do not recognize tin' Red Chinese leaders. It is a bandit government and I am opposed to permitting any group to shoot its way, for instance, into the United Nations— (MADIGAN) : Well, what do you suggest we do to force ibis change of mood and change of tactics on their part? I don't know that we can force anything. I think the change in attitude must come from there. (MADIGAN) : And we have to jusl sit and maintain a status quo? Well, we have lo lake care of our own interests and our own security, and we have done a great many things in an attempl In establish peace and security in the world. Un- fortunalely. we have been met at every turn by lhe hostility and opposition of Russia and the Red Chinese, and I think they could well change their attitude in many ways which would probably give us a little more confidence in their good faith, and then we could see whether a discussion was in order or not. (DOHERTY) : Senator, do you think the Chinese could do all these things you have suggested without losing face in tbe Orient? I don I know. Tbe Orient is a complicated grouping of nations and ideologies and peoples. If they made a substantial reversal of their position they might lose some supporl which they now have in thc fringe areas, and I do think lhal if they made a change in their position internally in China and gave some freedom inside of China and more self-determination they would gain favor with the Chinese people. (DOHERTY) : You mean if ihey held an election for instance? If ihey held elections, yes. The same thing applies to the satellite countries, in the Ralkans and Latvia and Estonia. (HURLEIGH) : Senator Hickenlooper, would peace with Russia bring prices and taxes down in this country? I think if a reliable peace could be assured, wc would have less money to spend for armaments which would reduce laves. So far as prices are concerned. I think prices would remain at a substantial level because of increased demand, increasing population and the increased need for consumer good-. (HURLEIGH) : Do you think thai Eisenhower is better equipped politically to cope witb the present Rig Four conference than weis Wilson with the Rig Four slates- men of World War I ? Well, wilh a great deal of respect for former President Wilson. I feel that Presidenl Eisenhower is heller equipped because of lhe years of turmoil and experience which we have had with this Communisl world-wide conspiracy which had not been tin' experience prior to lhe close of World War I. The circumstances are different, but I think the base of experience is much broader. (HURLEIGH): What do you think is ihe real reason why Russia has recently assumed a conciliatory altitude toward democracies'? Internal difficulties, I ihink. are besetting Russia so far as economy is concerned. I think she is having troubles and I think the' Russian leadership, at this moment, al leasl. is playing for time I said a moment ago lhat 1 don'l believe the Kremlin has changed its fundamental objective of win I.I communism. They arc merely taking a new lack. However, the lime which may be gained also mav work to our advantage because during the interim lhe hearts and minds of people may be changed somewhat. I hope so. FACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955 Page 17
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