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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
File 016
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 016. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/15.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 016. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/15

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 016, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/15.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript THE BIG FOUR CONFERENCE, Continued Following; are remarks of Sir Anthony Eden, Premier Edgar Faure, and Marshal Bulganin at the conclusion of the Geneva meeting: Sir Anthony Eden's Speech We bene now concluded the conference- of the heads of governments which has been so much discussed and so earnestly advocated, notably by Sir Winston Churchill more than two years ago . . . This conference set itself a limited lask. This it has more than accomp- lishe-el. Ten vears ago the war in Europe was brought to an end. Now at leisl we have made a start with the work which we might have hoped to begin In 1945. What we have now agreed makes it possible to get to grips with the twin problems of the unity of Germany and the security of Europe. No one expects lhal it will be easy to settle everv detail of these complicated issues. But there is now a better chance than we have known at any time since the war to get to work on practical proposals to solve the differences which have divided Europe all these year-. At this conference we did not set out to make a detailed plan in these few days. For all that, it will be found that in our directive to the foreign secretaries we have included the essentials of a comprehensive settlement. The world will have observed the tone and temper in which our work has been conducted. Those of us who have been engaged in the actual negotiations have been aware that a new spirit of conciliation has been present at our meet- ings. Hut in addition to this formal work. we have bad many opportunities for personal content-, which I know we have all femnd invaluable. I am quite certain that the exchanges which bene taken place outside the conference room have given all of us a far better understanding of each olher's points of view and of the problems each has to face. If we can continue our work together in the spirit of this meeting, what is hopeful promise todav should become -..li.l performance as events unfold. Premier Faure,s Speech (Translation from the French) Our meeting is drawing to a close. Bul for all that, we must not separate. I mean by this that if the four of us anno longer pre-se-nl in one room, we musl remain morally united with one and the- semie will, I consider that over and above the agreements which we have reached between us on certain subjects, texts and directives, lhe verv fact of our meeting, th.- spirit which has governed our de bates and the mutual understanding which resulted from it. will leave a profound mark on international relations and will have a happy influence on their evolution. We have shown here a common resolve. It is now our responsibility to find the means. The first step has been taken along this path, but there are slill obstacles to overcome. We have not sought to hide them, for it is through truth that all progress is achieved. If it is true that life todav is characterized by tension and force, may this tension and strength be thai of understanding and friendship, and no longer of hostility and distrust. To the peoples who look to us. and not only to those for whom we bene responsibility, we must be able to propose the progressive substitution of constructive and beneficial tasks of peace for the security measures which are still necessary. Marshal Bulganin's Speech (Translation from the Russian) There is no doubt that the present meeting in Geneva of the heads of governments of France. Great Britain, the I nited Stales and the Soviel Union has a positive meaning for the easing of tension in the relations between the governments and for the inevitable increase in confidence between them. Above all. this was facilitated by the personal contact in Geneva between the leaders of the four powers. We got to know each other better here and exchanged opinions on ;i series of important international problems. Despite the fact that on some questions our points of view did not coincide, on Ihe whole the meeting proceeded in an honest atmosphere and was marked by efforts of its participants to achieve mutual understanding. Tin- Geneva conference attracted the attention of the nations of lhe whole' world emd furlber strengthened their desire for the lessening of international tension and for the shortening nf the cold war. We hope thai all of this will play it- positive role and will facilitate the achievement of a worthy goal the securing of a solid and lasting peace. The Soviet delegalion came to lhe Geneva meeting with the good intentions of facilitating the' organization of practical work for the solution above all of these basic international problems- such eis. for example, the organization of European collective security and disarmament. In present conditions these questions have ei decisive meaning for this la-k of strengthening world peace. The most important issue of the Geneva conference was the problem of European securit\. The Soviet delegation considers that, in the interests of strengthening peace, a system of collective security should be created in Europe, based on the participation of all European governments and the United States of America. Our new proposals on this question, put to the Geneva conference, are based on the consideration lhat in presenl circumstances—when opposing groupings of nalions have been created in Europe' —it is necessary above all to put the relations between the nations included in these groupings on the palh of normal peaceful cooperation and of the peaceful solution of disputes between them. In this firsl stage of lhe creation of an all-European security system, tin- Soviel proposals do not envisage lhe liquidation of the North Atlantic bloc, the Western European Union or the Vi ar- saw Treaty Organization. Wilh thc passage of lime, in the second stage, when successes in lhe lessening of tension in Europe will have been achieved and confidence between governments will have been established, tin- above-named groupings may be dissolved and replaced by a collective security system in Europe. Together with thi-. lhe Soviet delegation proposed that, before lhe creation of a European collective security system there should he agreement on the conclusion of a pad between the govern- menls participating in these groupings in Europe to reject force and to use only peaceful means to settle their disputes. The exchange of opinions on this problem of European security sheeucel that all of lhe participants of the conference wished In find an agreed solution for this important problem. We hope that in the course of future consideration of this problem even greater success will be achieved. On the question of disarmament tin- Soviet government tabled even before iln- Geneva conference on May 10— concrete proposals for the reduction of armaments, tbe outlawing of atomic weapons and the removal of the threat of war. Al the Geneva conference we pro- pee-e-el lo define' the alre-eidv achieved agreement on aspects concerning which our positions are either fullv at one or have come significantly closer together. This concerns first of all the fixing of tin- level of armaments of the governments, prohibition of alomie weapons and the necessary establishment of a system of effective international controls. The discussion of thc question of disarmament showed that ail of the participants in the conference wished to find an agreed solution of this verv important Pane 14 FACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955
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