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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
File 014
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 014. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/13.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 014. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/13

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 014, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/13.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript BIG FOUR CONFERENCE Report of President Eisenhower (Continued from Page 6) that we were going primarily to attempt to change the spirit in which these great negotiations and conferences were held. A transcript was made of that talk and I should like now to read you one paragraph from it. This is what I said with respect to our purpose: "We realize that one ingredient has been missing from all past conferences. That is an honest intent to conciliate, to understand, to be tolerant, to try to see the other fellow's viewpoint as well as we see our own. I say to you if we can change the spirit in which these conferences are conducted we will have taken the greatest step toward peace for future prosperity and tranquility that has ever been taken in all the history of mankind." During last week in formal confer- and in personal visits, these purposes have been pursued. So now there exists a better understanding, a closet unity among the nations of NATO. Then' seems to be a growing realization by all lhat nuclear warfare, pursued to trie ultimate, could be practically race suicide. There is a realization that negotiations can be conducted without propaganda and threat and invective. Finally, there is a sharpened realization by the world lhal the United States will go to any length consistent with our concepts of decency and justice and right to obtain peace. For this purpose we will work cooperatively with the Soviets and any other people as long as there is sincerity of purpose and a genuine desire to go ahead. Now. in the course of carrying on these discussions there were a number of specific proposals, some of which are items on the official agenda. That agenda contains German unification and European security, disarmament and increased contacts of all kinds between the Easl and the West. Now most of the conference meetings were given wide publicity and even some of the specific suggestions made in those conferences likewise were publicized. In anv event. I can assure you of one thing. There were no secret agreements made', cither understood agreements or written agreements. Everything is put before vou on the record. Now outside of these conference meetings there were numerous unofficial meetings, conversations with important members of the other delegations, eunl of course verv specifically with the Soviet delegation. In these conversations a number of subjects were discussed and among them the Secretary of State and I specifically brought up more than once American convictions and American beliefs, American concern aboul such questions as lhe satellites of Eastern Europe and the activities of international communism. We made crystal clear what America believes about such matters as these. Now. to take up for the moment the items on the official agenda. Probably no question causes as much trouble as that of German reunification and European security. At first wc thought that these could be dealt with separately, but the American delegation concluded that they had lo be dealt with as one subject. Wc held that Germany should be reunited under a government freely chosen by themselves and under conditions that would provide security both for nations of the Fast and for nations of the West. In fact, in a framework that provided European security. In the matter of disarmament the American government believes that an effective disarmament system can be reached only if at its base there is an effective reciprocal inspection and overall supervision system, one in which we can have confidence anil each side can know that the other is carrying out his commitments. Now because' of ibis belief we joined with the French and the Rritish in making several proposals: some were' global. some we're local, some were sort of budgetary in chararter. but all were in furtherance of this one single- objective: that is. to make inspect ion lhe basis of disarmament proposals. Now, one proposal suggested aerial photography as between lhe Soviets and ourselves bv unarmed peaceful planes, and to make Ibis inspection just as thorough as this kind of reconnaissance can possibly be. Thc principal purpose, of course, was to convince everyone of Western sincerity in seeking peace. Bul another idea was this: if wc could go ahead and establish this kinel of inspection as an initiation of an inspection system, we could possibly develop it into a broader one and eventually build on it an effective and durable disarmament system. Now, in the matter of increasing con- tacts, many items were discussed. We talked about a freer flow of in \\s across tin- curtains of eill kinds. We talked about thc circulation of books, and particularly we talked about peaceful trading. Rut thc subjeet lhat look most of our attention in this regard was the pos sibility of increased \ isits by the citizens of one country into the territory of another, doing this in such way as to give each the fullest possible opportunity to learn about the people of the other nation. Now, in this particular subject there was the greatest possible degree of agreement. As a matter of fact, it was an agreement often repeated and enthusiastically supported by the words of thc members of each side. As a matter of fact, each side assured the other earnestly and often that il intended to pursue a new spirit of conciliation and cooperation in its contacts with lhe other. Now, of course, we are profoundly hopeful that these assurances will be faithfully carried out. One evidence as to these assurances will, of course, be available soon in the language anil the terminology in which we will find speeches and diplomatic exchanges couched. Rut the acid test should begin next October, because then is when the next meeting occurs. It will be a meeting of the foreign ministers and its principal purpose will be to take the conclusions of this conference as to the subjects lo be discussed and tbe general procedures to be observed in translating those generalities that we talked aboul into actual speeific agreements. Then is when real conciliation and some giving on each side will be definitely necessary. For myself, I do nol belittle the ob- stacles lying ahead on the road to a secure and just peace. By no means do I underestimate the long and exhausting work that will be necessary before retu results are achieved. I do not blink the fact that al] of us musl continue to sacrifice for whal we believe to hi' besl for the safety of ourselves einel for the preservation of the things in which we believe. But I do know that the people of the world want peace. Moreover, every other individual who was ai Geneva likewise fell this longing of mankind. So there is great pressure in advance constructively—nol merely to re-enact lhe dreary performan the negative performances of the past. We, all of us, individually and as a people, now have possibly thc most difficult assignment of our nation's history. Likewise we have the most shining opportunity ever possessed by Americans. Mav these truths inspire', never dismay us. I believe thai only wilh prayerful pa- tience, Intelligence, courage and toler- ance never forgetting vigilance and prudence—can we keep alive the spark ignited at Geneva. Rut if we eire successful in this then we will make constantly brighter the lamp lhat will one deiv guide us to our goal ei just emd lasting peace. Thank you. Good night lo each of you. I Pace 12 FACTS FORUM NEWS, Orfe>/.,-,-, in:,
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