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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 013. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/12.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 013. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/12

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 013, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/12.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript pictures of the smiling President, apparently exchanging pleasantries with the smiling Communist butchers. We may be sure that the Soviet government has had those pictures .distributed in every city and hamlet behind the Iron Curtain—along with Mr. Eisenhower's statement that he believes Ihe Soviets have good intentions. I cannot imagine a more lethal blow to the morale of the captive peoples than the reports thev arc sure lo get of Mr. Eisenhower's friendly meeting with llieir oppressors. While I am on this subjeel. I lliink it is finally time to sav a word aboul the n-lettionship between the President and Marshal Zhukov. If Dwighl Eisenhower were a private citizen, his friendship with a Communist might be nobody's business but his own. But he is not. He is the President of lhe United Stales: and. as such, ought to have a decent regard for the feelings of his countrymen. Marshal Zhukov may have been Mr. Eisenhower's wartime "buddy." a comrade in arms, and all that: but it remains that he is a leading member of a ruthless cabal that holds one-third of the world's peoples in chains, and that, "lo boot." is determined lo destroy the I nited State's. It goes without saving thai Marshal Zhukov would not be where he is today, did he not support communism wholeheartedly and did he not jeee-M'ss the measure of deceit, treachery, and brutality that qualifies for membership in the Communisl high command. The argument that, through Zhukov. we have .1 pipeline to the Kremlin is sheer nonsense: Zhukov is not going to tell lhe President anything the Communist leadership does not want him to know. Moreover, the sort of thing that Zhukov is likely to tell the Presidenl is the sort of thing the President should hear less of. not more. Before I am berated for making an i~sue' eef tic Kisenhower-Zhukov relationship, let me ask those who would berate' me what they would have said and written had Franklin Roosevelt con- eluded a pact of mutual trust and friendship with, say, Hermann Gocring or Joseph Goebbels. So far, I have spoken of the Geneva conference largely in terms of the Communisls' success in demoralizing the West. But it would be very wrong to suppose that the atmosphere of appeasement generated at Geneva damaged only our spirit, our will to resist. There is every reason to believe thai concrete measures of appeasement were agreed upon at Geneva which have not been revealed lo the American people. Last Monday [July 251 the Presidenl assured us that there were no secret agreements either written or otherwise eet Geneva. Wc were also led to believe lhat the' Far Eastern situation was not discussed. But on Wednesday, Prime Min ister Eden lold the House of Commons that the Far Eastern crisis had been discussed in lhe secrel Big Four meetings. What was decided in those secret meetings, we do not know. But in the light of the Slale Department announcement —coming, as it did. right after Geneva —of talks with the Chinese Communists on the question of a ceasefire in the Formosa Straits, il is highly probable iheil the President agreed with the Communists to negotiate about Quemoy and the Matsus. Moreover, in view of today's news that lhe Chinese Communists have released eleven of lhe remaining 477 American prisoners of weir, it is possible thai this week's ambassadorial talks will simply ratify a deal made at the Big Four meeting to surrender the offshore islands lo the Communists, for it has long been apparent that we would bargain for the return of our prisoners of war by making territorial concessions to Red China. Whatever agreement about the Far Easl nets reached in Geneva, it is clear iheil lhe campaign to sell out free China is under a full head of steam. The administration has already gone back on its solemn promise to Chiang Kai-shek not to negotiate on questions dealing with the rights and territories of the Republic of China without the participation of thc free Chinese. The administration does not want Chiang's representatives ai those talks, for lhe understandable reason lhat ihev would oppose' the administration's plans. Once Quemoy and the Matsus are lost, the Republic of China will be effectively neutralized and there will no longer be any realistic hope of having Chiang return to the mainland—-a fact the administration knows onlv too well. Our policy toward Free China is more than a betrayal of a devoted and fighting ally: it is a blatant repudiation of the Republican party's solemn pledges to the American people. Once again, let tne recall to the Senate' what we Republicans lold thc American people in 1952. when wc asked them to elect us to office: "We shall again make liberty into a beacon light of hope that will penetrate lhe dark places. That program will give the Voice of America a real function. It will mark lhe end of the negative, futile. and immoral policy of 'containment which abandons countless human beings to a despotism and godless terrorism, which in turn enables the rulers l" forge the captives into a weapon for our destruction." Mr. Presidenl. lhe' way wc have lived up to that promise does not make nn proud of my party. There are three areas in lhe world where we might have' implemented a policy of liberation, bul have refused to do so. We mighl have implemented ii in Eastern Europe, along the lines 1 suggested several weeks ago. by withdrawing diplomatic recognition from the satellite regimes, and by establishing governments-in-exile. But the administration is satisfied wilh expressing a humanitarian concern for the satellite peoples. We might have implemented it in Korea, by giving the armies of South Korea the equipment and support they need to liberate their northern brethren. Bul the administration has termed such a liberation attempt "an aggressive war.*' and we eire- now withholding the supplies which the South Koreans need in order to go it alone. Finally, we might have kept Chiang Kai-shek's forces unleashed. But the Truman-Acheson policy has been revived, and we are proceeding with the' neutralization of Formosa. The coming sellout in Asia is different from most sellouts in the past, in that this time we can clearly see it coming. There is thus the opportunity to prevent it—if only there were the will. On the level of the national government, lhat will does not exist, for the once powerful opposition to appeasement, encompassing nearly every Republican legislator, has all but faded away. There is only the remnant. The Eisenhower administration has adopted every important plank of the Democratic party's foreign policy. And since the President does precisely what the Demo- crats want him to do. there is no chance of opposition there. Most Republicans. I think, are. in their hearts, opposed lo lhe President's policies. But they have accepted thc theory that they cannot return to office in 1956 without having Mr. Eisenhower at the head of the party lie kit: and they are. I am afraid, prepared to subordinate consideration of sound policy to those of political survival. As a result, the Republican party platform is just a scrap of paper. It is not a pretty picture—the Geneva demoralization and the China sellout, and it mosl certainly is not a hopeful one. Five years ago I saw a picture that was only slightly less bleak and slightlv less hopeful than this one. It depicted a situation that affected the survival of this nation every bit as seriously as does the situation today. As I saw it then, there was only one recourse—to take the issue to the American people. That is lhe onlv solution I see today. I shall go to the people. If I. and the others who will join me in this fight, are successful it will be because the American people have the innate good sense to make sound and courageous decisions when thev eire given the- facts. I propose to give them the facts, ll may be too late, but insofar as my eileililies and enduranre permit. I shall see to it that this countrv does not die without the people of the country being given a chance to save it. FACTS FORUM NEWS, Octobtr, 1955 Page 11
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