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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 011. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/10.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 011. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/10

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 011, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/10.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript .....s^^ri'S-.. -Wide World Photo Council table in Geneva, July 18th. On the left (centerl are President Eisenhower and Secretary of State Dulles. In foreground (backs to the camera) are Russian Delegates Gromyko, Molotov, Bulganin, Khrushchev and Zhukov. The French delegation, headed by Premier Faure, is at the far end. The British delegation. Prime Minister Eden in charge, is at right. back the clock twenty years, and try the approach llicy had used successfully during the popular-front era of the thirties. That policy had not yielded territories; but it had softened up the West, and paved the way for the conquests of the forties. The Western powers, the Communists reasoned, fell for the ruse once before; they, therefore, might fall for it again. The Communist aim, then, was to establish an atmosphere of mutual trust and confidence—an atmosphere in which the popular front would flourish once again, an atmosphere thai would cause the West to drop its guard and to relax ils vigilance. In ihis. the Communists were utterly and completely successful. The way is now open for lhe re-emergence of coalition governments in France and Italy, for neutralizing Japan and Germany, for the development of "voluminous" East-West trade—to use President Eisenhower's word—which will holster Russia's economy and strengthen her mililarv machine. And. finally, the climate is righl for persuading the united States to abandon ils fighting allies, the Chinese Nationalists, the South Koreans, and the South Vietnamese. So much for Communisl aims and achievements. Now what did the United States hope to accomplish at the Big Four meeting? The doubletalk lhal emanated daily from the State Departmenl and the White House in the weeks '"•fore the conference made ibis ques* lion difficult to answer; but it could be boiled down to ibis: we had two objectives One which we might call the objective of "clarifying Ike'- mind"; the other, the objective of forcing Soviet concessions from "positions of strength." These two objectives implied very different approaches lo the conference for the reason, I think, that the President and Secretary Dulles had, at that time. very different ideas to the real character of the Soviet peace offensive. Let us, first, examine the Rig Four's achievements in the light of the President's objective. Mr. Eisenhower set forth his views at a press conference nn May 11. When asked why he had changed his mind about the desirability of a summit conference, he said: "I would hope that my own mind would be clarified a little bit. ' The President, in other words, was not quite sure what the Communisls were after, and proposed to have a conference wilh the Kremlin leaders in order to clear up his doubts. I com- ininti'd at the time that the President had no business attending a conference with Communists if he did nol understand Communist objectives, and that, in any event, it was just a little naive to expect that the Communists, in their leilk> with him, would come clean as lo their real aims. Whal was learned al Geneva aboul Soviel intentions? The world learned or, better, lhal part of the world thai paid attention to the concrete positions taken by the Sox iel delegation thai Communist intentions were the same as ever: destruction of Western civilization and Communisl domination of the world. Bul whal did the President learn? The Presidenl discovered lhat the Sovin leaders sincerely wanted peace. And how did thc Presidenl arrive al thai conclusion? Why. Bulganin told him so, Khrushchev lold him so. and—-just in any doubts lingered—his old chum Zhukov told him so. It mattered not to the President that the specific Soviet proposals, in every instance, refuted these assurances. For he had it on the solemn word of three Communisl gangsters—whose present positions of power are attributable, among other things, to never having deviated from the Communist teaching that one must always . tell lies when the interests of communism are served by telling lies—that communism sincerely wanted peace with the West. To my mind. Mr. Eisenhower's profession of faith in the Communisls' sin- eerily was the most astonishing state- nicnl ever uttered in public by a President of the United Slates. One would have expected the American press, had il still a sense of responsibility, In have heaped ridicule upon lhe President's head. Instead, the reporters and the columnists relayed the statement to the American people with lhe strongest implications that it was a carefully weighed. level-headed judgment, thoroughly warranted by the farts. The only thing to be regretted about the statement, lhe press observed, was lhat it mighl get the President into trouble wilh unimaginative politicians back home. It is surely a sad commentary on the times. Mr. President, thai il must be left to unimaginative politicians lo point out the flagrant absurdity of taking on their fare Communist assurances about their good intentions. Why did the press, itself, not make the point? One would have thought that the men and women, who once conceived it their solemn duty to remind the American people every day of the week thai the Nazis could not be trusted, wnuld have seen fit to advise the American people that Communists can be (rusted no more than Nazis—that Rulganin's guaranty at Geneva was every bil as reliable as Hitler's at Munich. And where were the members of this bodv. Mr. President, and of the House, when that outlandish statement was made? Why were they silent? The Democrats mav be excused, for the habil of apologizing for visionaries and appeas- ers of llieir own party has probably desensitized them lo such ihings. Rut why did not Republicans—every one of them —speak out? When Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman offered similar appraisals of Soviel intentions; in the hev- eleiv of our alliance with Russia, the Republican partv denounced such foolishness in rounder terms than I am using today. Since Democrats have a President who thinks the way thev do. and Republicans a President who. thev feel, is indispensable for keeping their party in power, the number of protests can be counted on the fingers of one hand. (Continued on next pane) FACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955 Pace 9
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