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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
File 059
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 059. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/618.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 059. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/618

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 059, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/618.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 059
Transcript BURT: I would like to go to Mr. Buckley next and I'm saving you as my ace in the hole, Mr. Smith. Ill CKLEI : I eigne- with you that the disciple- nl John Dewey have certainly carried John Dewey further than he himself weis evidently prepared to go. (In the other beind. I happen to question, as I believe Mr. Smith dues, the validity of Mr. Dewey's central lliesis or central understanding of ibis. Mi. Smith in bis lirsi book quoted jocularly ;e remark made by ;i nine-year- old girl who had flunked reading and accosted with this by her father, she commented, "Hui that's all rigbl. I gol a hundred in postwar planning." I think this tells us el whole lol eihoul what is going on in the schools today, thai we arc nol focusing on the central skills wiiliniii which we can'l ever acquire anv education, and withoul which certainly we can't leike care of postwar planning as our present siliietliou indicates. BURT: So far we have something here that seldom happens, three panel members agreeing on this topic that . . . COMBS: No, I don't, Hardy. I don't. Iii tlie first place. I think that the mod ein method is ei superior method peda- gogically speaking bul I regret the feiet that there has nol been ei stronger accent on the development of rudimentary and essential skills. BURT: Well, what you're saying is that they should be a tot better. Combs: Yes. I'm inclined to believe perhaps, taken by and large, thai it's superior to the old method. Hodces: I ihink theii we are going through a period of balancing. I believe iheil the old rigid discipline, in bulb senses, weis ei -iretiijaekii. straitjackel nl personality, and ei straitjackel in regard in facts, nnt ability In ihink necessaril). Thai wets ei by-product nf the earlier education. I think, secondly, thai ils ver) importanl lor us In realize lhal we have come In ei stage where we kno« in.ne aboul the child, both from the standpoint of the teacher eunl edsu from lhe standpoinl of lhe parent. If lln' par- enl doesn't know more aboul the child you have ei grave dereliction of duty here, emd ihis is one of the major problems. You can'l discuss schools unless x liscuss family and parental respon- sibilities. And you people always go nil on the tangent. You musl come righl back In lhe core of the individual. Now ei- In the parent . . . Ill I KI.KI : The poinl nf V iew of till" tn.e.Iiiii educator has leiken tin- position consistently thai the parent i- ee nuisance. Tiny mosl certainly do. especially in the colleges . . . Hodges: Ob. no. now. that's -wail ei minute, Mr. Buckley, you pick mi . . . Ih i klei : lb- is there to procreate children and pay the hills eiml eis far eis they're concerned, they're through wilh FAl I- FORI M NKWS. \ovember, 1955 him. They are uniformly bored wilh lhe existence of lhe parenl eis such. And it has to do wilh the whole central wedge into the leiiniK institution. Hodges: Now, Mr. Buckley, vou are saying "you" and I can sety from medial iheil is absolutely untrue. BUCKLEY: Well, then you musl be' an exception. Hodges: No. I ihink I represent . . . BURT: Just a minute. SMITH: But you don't control public school education. Vm represent education on lhe college level. You're not representative, thank Cod. of professional education in America. BURT: Let's get back on the track again because the question we are really trying to bring out is, "Should methods of teaching reading and writing be improved?" Now, for example, in your classrooms—you're professor of international politics at New York University—do students come in there whose reading is not as good as it should be? Even at the college level? Smith: That's a >cs. Admit it. Hodges: Well, eit the graduate school level—because I particularly started mil seiving that I'm not em educator in the school of education sense, and I think thai iheil is very important—al the graduate level, and il's significanl because ii includes the old line private school and lhe product of thc puhlie school. they're utterly indistinguishable. I ihink (hell's ei very importanl social situation. You can'l tell the educational antecedents of the problem. Buckley: By the time you get to the graduate school you've been very carefully screened and there s etlsn . . . Combs: Yes, it's the top level of intelligence. Hodges: No, I wouldn't seiv that. It's et cross section of brains, admittedly. Bul there are no special channelings, particularly under the (il setup. Smith : Maj I return in ee comment of Mr. Combs. You seiiel. eis I recall il. that Mm fell this attempt to adjust young people in their sneieel environment was a healthy thing. And I think we could eill agree that in ei certain extent that i- ei function of education. But, ei- you said, lhe primary function nf education is the training of the intelligence, lhe I raining uf the mind. Now. the facl is. eunl il scemis lo me lhal mosl parents don't know this and I do blame the parents for not knowing, thai there is ei very huge segmenl of American educational thought that says iheit the ptimeiiv function of education i- iiiii lhe training "I the mind or the training of the moral sense hut is just euljiisiing in ihe environment. \- a mallei uf facl. the United States Office of Education, which is ets official ee- \.ili cent gel ill education, savs lhal iiii per cenl of American youth is incapable either nf going tn college, being trained for college or being trained for the vocations. Therefore thc thing for us to do i- tee give lliini some kind of program, good grooming or whatever it is. lo euljiisl them In life. Now that seems to me to be an ullerlv cynical and probably unscientific conclusion. BURT: I'd like to know what is meant specifically—why do they say that 60 per cent are incapable of going to college? You mean they don't have the IQ to go? Smith: Presumably, on the basis of intelligence. 60 per cent of American youth are just loo dull emd not cdui etble. in he educated in the traditional sense. BURT: Does it say what proportion are in colleges that shouldn't be there because they can't be educated? Combs: I noticed just a few weeks ago uiie uf the professors of history at Harvard referred lo the fail that there are now pouring into our higher educa- liemal institutions a very large proportion of men who should not be in college- eit eill. BURT: Well, what could be done about that, Mr. Combs? Combs: 1 would suggest the imposition of ver) much higher entrance re- quirements and a more selective system for lhe choice of candidates for et degree I'd send the rest to vocational school emd I would not regard beauty culture eis equivalent lo a course in Homer. Hodges: Well, that's the whole battle. Smith: ll seems tn me one of the greal problems in American public education is whal to dn wilh the young person whn i- nut college material. \tc we, then, going lo just Iry lo adjust him lo bis environment? Are we just going to train him vocationally? Or are there values in education theit wc can give this young man? I don'l Ihink we ought to give hint up. Not certainly on the beisis of lhe 611 per cent. HODGES: We don't give him up at \U . BURT: Just to think in terms of material reward or financial gain, isn't it true that it doesn't necessarily pay off to go to college? There are a lot of people who don't go to colleges that become extremely successful and are paid a lot more working in skilled trades and . . . Combs: Anyone whn goes to college with the idea of augmenting his earning power doesn'l deserve to be in college. BURT: Don't you think that most people do go to college with that idea? Combs: I'm very much afraid so. and that's one reason I believe it's such ei sterile experience for the average boy. Buckley: ,i es. 1 ihink the inflated culture thai we live in has a whole lot to do with this question. Alberl J. Nock gave ei historical scries of (--axon the question in I'T'tS at the University of \ irginia in which he pointed out that unless we are prepared to distinguish between the trainable and the educable we are forever going lo be saddled with this kind of problem. I'll Re "J7
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