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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 058. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/617.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 058. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/617

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 058, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/617.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 058
Transcript restless youth with us. We can tighten up and we may very well face conditions which require special emphasis, bur instance, in the New York City schools, due to the great influx of newcomers, this time from Puerto Rico, you have a problem that almost defies teaching, including the communication of ieleas in the English language. BURT: Are you saying there should be more discipline in New York City schools because of the influx of Puerto Ricans? Hodges: There you have a problem of thoroughgoing revision of method, and that's one of the very excellent things the New York public school system is tackling. BURT: Revisions of methods of discipline? Hodges: Methods of discipline and methods of communication in terms of teaching. And I think we have to avoid broad generalizations. Many communities don't have this problem at all. Other communities have it in excess. I think it's almost a contagion at times. BURT: So far we seem to have had pretty much nothing but generalizations and Mr. Buckby sometimes can get extremely specific. What do you think, Mr. Buckley, should there be more discipline in the classroom? Buckley: I would like to concentrate on one sense of the word "discipline" as di-linguished by Mr. Smith, not touch on the question of physical discipline. I do think that there is complete anarchy as regards intellectual discipline. The cry of the modern educators and of the academic freedomiles that ihey see it as their function to leach people how to think and consequently they ought not to be interfered with by the alumni or by the constituents of the local schools, has been shown to be a completely phony pretention. It is demonstrable lhat the average graduate of the average school in the United States today, whether a college or a high school or a graduate school, demonstrably does not know how to think. That is to seiv. he goes in fnr illogical statements. He i- incapable of assessing evidence. He is inconsistent ami he is intolerant. According to the criterion laid down bv Plato, and it's one that I think here all of us will buy, that the test of the educated man is bis ability to see things as they arc. then I say that we are in a position to lay down an indictment againsl modern education on the grounds that its graduates do nol know how to think. BURT: But so far as the question of discipline is concerned, do you think . . . BUCKLEY: This is discipline, intellect- ueil discipline. BURT: I'm sure you have quite a few ideas on this, Mr. Combs . . . Combs: Yes. and verv badly scrambled, too, I may add. I can. however, teike issue and must tetke issue immediately with Mr. Buckley's statement tbat the function of the educational process is nul tn teach how to think. It seems to me lhat that is the only valid objective which education can have—to teach the disciplines etnd the technique of logical thoughl. 1 suggest thai he proposes as a substitute the teaching of certain arbitrary or dogmatic principles which I don't believe lo be sus- teiincd. and moreover this is an interesting thing. BUCKLEY: This is a different argument, but I'm willing to meet you on your field. In other words. I am saying that, according to your own specifications, you have failed. That is lo seiv. by "you." I mean thc people you represent here and the people yon continuously defend. I say they have failed simply on the quest ion of whether or not they are successfully teaching people how to ibink. Combs: Now there we get to the crux of the meilter ets I was going In pose il. You and I arc both products, I take it, of fairly good educational systems, eit least in its higher reaches or in graduate or post-graduate work. Your ideas and the conclusions which vnu draw are diametrically opposed tn mine. Buckley: No, no, no. I'm not talking about values. I'm talking about shcerly rigorous logical thoughl the kind of thing lhat Robert Hutchins or Eleanor Roosevelt comes out with . . . Combs: Yes. The application, however, of that same disembodied, logical iniimpassioned intelligence will lead you to one conclusion quite disparate from mine. Now we can't both be right, obviously. Buckley: No, wc I.nth know thai eel a certain point after we go through the logical steps we introduce a serie-s ul values on lhe basis of which we come in certain conclusions about the meaning of or the evidence . . . COMBS: You mean lhat the subjective meanings color your logical conclusions? Buckley: I'm saving thai you eem take a tremendous number of bin red statements uf people who defend the educational system, the kind ol people who review Mr. Smith's book, for example, emd simple extract from lhat. <>n the basis of a textual analysis, of what they eire saying, contradictions undistributed middles emd eill e.f lhe cardinal -in-. Vmi I -;e\ thai ihe terrible thing aboul il is thai the liberals don'l even understand thai they don l know how to ihink. CoMBS: Thai i- ei theme emd ei field which I would lee\e- lee pursue, bul nol today. BURT: Let's pinpoint this a little farther by asking Mr. Smith this question: "Are modern methods of teaching reading and writing more effective than those used in the little red schoolhouse?" Smith: My temptation is to reply first that they ought lo be. considering the lad theit we spend -o much more in trying to pul over education lhan we did in lhe lime of the little red school- house. In lhe community I come from, eis I remember the figures, in 1 <S08 we spent twelve dollars per year per pupil. Now we spend over three hundred dol- leirs per yceir per pupil. Even allowing for the terrific inflation of the dollar il seems to me lhat we are spending a great deal more on education of the young. We are presumably exposing our teachers to longer periods of Ireiiiiing. We have much better equipment emd much belter buildings. Now. whether ur not we are teaching them the fundamentals much better than we did in the time of the little red schoolhouse. I think it's almost impossible to prove by objective e\idence. BURT: Don't you think we're getting our money's worth? Smith: ll seems to me that we're having complaints from people who are perfectly honest etnd who have the welfare of the schools at heart, such as college presidents and teachers themselves, and certainly parents, that we are failing in teaching the fundamentals, BURT: Why, Mr. Smith, are we failing? Smith : Lei as talk about one particular subject — the matter of learning to read. Pm not an expert on reading which, I understand, is quite a science, but it seems lo me lhal during the 1920's and the 19H0's we prelly much did throw mil lhe system of phonetics which seems to be a sound system for the average student, I think there is now an attempt to a certain extent lo go back te> pb -lie- iii ihe so-called remedial leading classes. BURT: Go ahead, Mr. Combs. Suppose you take this question up next. laiMlts: I think liny .ire probably more effective empirically. They are practically effective. Children may learn to read, for example, leister litem they did before, but lltett lietrdK -earns to me to be the point. The modern educational system, and I'm nnw speaking of lhe primary einel secondary sel Is. in -nine respects i- superior tn the uhl educational system in lhat it does offer a training in contemporary life eunl man- eiges in hi ihe child more ur less harmoniously into ihe pattern of bis community or social existence. That's fine, unl I regard thai eis ei definite advance. Whii I quarrel with, however, is the lack of emphasis, or distributed em- pluisis. on basic -kill- which seem lo me lo be absolutely requisite a verv close application to the disciplines of reading .mil oi arithmetic, nf logic etnd eill of that which should go into thc training of ei mi in I. I'm sorry thai Professor Dewey's philosophy, valid in itself, has been so deformed or distorted, if then be the case, ibai ii heis resulted in this real malformation of the educational process. PliKC ,»6 l'\e I- FORI M NEWS, \.■umber. 1955
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