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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 056. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/615.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 056. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/615

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 056, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/615.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 056
Transcript of the extent to which the publishers in Ibis abominable argument that Mr. Combs has just put forward are beholden exclusively to the country club set emd to ei preoccupation for keeping their money would be lo ask a wholly different question, and that is to whal extent did they, for example, prefer Taft to Eisenhower? Now lhe difference between Taft and Stevenson was a very marked one. The differences between Eisenhower and Stevenson were, in my opinion, rather precious. The very fact that the Washington Post was pro-Eisenhower is the kind ol ihitiL' that I'm talking about, to say nothing of the fact lhat a lot of these publishers, such eis Mr. Arthur (Crock, for example, reported in September, 1952. that whereas they actually preferred Adlai Stevenson, they felt they had to kill Taft emd the only way successfully to kill Taft would be to guarantee support for Eisenhower if they wenl on and nominated him. The point is theit the influential opinion molders in this country are the editorial writers, the professors. The publicists are. by and large, pro-left, pro-liberal." George Hamilton Combs interjected a query as to whether Buckley weis comparing Eisenhower with the liberal point of view, to which Buckle) replied, "Eisenhower is a liberal, surely. " To this Mr. Combs demurred, stating that anybody who stomachs Dixon- Yates, or Scott Mi I.cod. is a reactionary. PIGEONHOLING THE PRESS Questioned by Moderator Hardy Burt regarding which papers might be regarded as pro-liberal and pro-conservative, Ralph de Toledano replied, "Well, I think if we start cataloging we can be here eill afternoon. Bul let's stetrt out with the major papers, lln- New ) ork Times is often called a conservative newspaper. The New ) ork Times has nol been conservative for ten years. Mr. Arthur Hays Sulzberger does not fall into the conservative class. Neither do any of his editors. The lasl real conservative on the Neiv York Times i- Arthur Krock. and Arthur Krock merely writes column-, emd nol every day . . . In Chicago vou have the Sun-Times which is a New Deal paper, and you have the Chicago Tribune. Those are the major papers, yel the Chicago Tribune, while Republican, spends most of its linic beating the brains out of the Republican administration. So it falls into a special categor) . "In San Francisco you have thi Francisco Chronicle: that's a liberal newspaper, and it happens to be ei very influential payier nationally. It's one of these papers that are read. (Then) the Louisville Courier-Journal. Another one of the great newspapers of the I'nited States, and by great I mean a paper with influence, is the St. Louis Post- Dispatch and journalistically for great papers as the Times is. lis politics are \ iolcnlly liberal. '"lnu go to Milwaukee, which is a lug city, and vou have the Milwaukee Journal, which is violently liberal againsl the Milwaukee Sentinel, which is not a strong paper, and which is conservative. "You go down into New Orleans and you have the Picayune and some of the oilier papers there . . . It's my business to read hundreds of newspapers in the course of ei week. I don't classify those as conservative newspapers. "In Los Aiu-'elcs the one real news- peiper happen- to be a conservative newspaper, lhe Los Angeles Times. But by emd large," Mr. de Toledano con- cluded, "lhe press of this country lakes its tone from one newspaper and one newspaper alone let's face it. That's the New York Times. And the New York Times heis given speice in its news column- and on ils editorial page consistently to liberal ceiuscs emd taken ei strong stand against what it calls the reactionaries within the Republican parly." INFLUENTIAL BECAUSE THEY'RE LIBERAL George Hamilton Combs parried, "Thi- i- delightful. I have never held an argument tailor-made for me by the opposition. There are, it is quite true. aboul ten of these new-papers which are of libera] persuasion and each one of them Mr. de Toledano admits cxerls tremendous influence. Why? Because they arc greal papers and bcceiuse the quality eel the' paper, the editorial lead- ership, the intelligence which informs ihe paper, i- commensurate with the liberal philosophy, emd that's whv they're greal. and that's why they're read . . ." lie Toledano commented theit Mr. Combs heul. bv his admission that the liberal peepers cxerl tremendous influence, destroyed his own argument that there is et one-sided press. "No, I haven't," reiterated Mr. Combs, "I haven't because they arc still limited. "View let'- lake lhe .\eiv Yuri; Times which you characterize eis liberal. That would In' a shocking designation lo some of mv Democratic friends. Inasmuch as the New lurk Times supp,.ileal President Eisenhower, who was the candidate of the reactionaries withoul eun doubt, in lhe fall elections. The New ) ork Times heis included liberal material in il- columns. Well, of course il has—it's a newspaper. That's why it's a very effective one." At this poinl William Buckley, Jr.. commented theit be didn't ihink they we're' going lo <_ee'l el n\ w hel .■ lev Simply saying theit those people who support Eisenhower are ipso facto conservatives and lhat slavish agents of lhe country club arc a pro-greedy selfish interest set. "And I would suggest." he said, "that the firsl person lo take offense at the kind ul thing Mr. Combs has seiiel would be llie publisher of lhe \ctv ) ork Times who. if he were scaled here, woulel insist that yes. indeed, he was a lihered and on practicall) eill of the issues lhat come up iheil accurately separate the libera] from lhe conservative llu- Sew ) ork Times comes out predictively on the liberal side. I maintain you have an empty discussion here if you're going to pursue il nn lhe grounds theit anybody who supports Eisenhower is a conservative. "Precisely lhe reason." he continued. "thai most of Ihese people eire supporting emd have supported Eisenhower is because thev knew thai wilh Eisenhower, ;i- Aiihiir Ktaiek hiin-elf confessed in his columns, there would nol be anv recognizable change in lhe course of the history of the country." "All this talk about Eisenhower being et reactionary," inserted de Toledano, "the two men closest to Eisenhower, the two men who have the mosl influence on him are Paid Hoffman emd Milton Eisenhower. And even George ("ombs does not . . . place them in the reactionary category." "I would." replied Combs, "place them slightly lo lhe right of Professor I lodges, which I eissure vnu is not a position of great extremism." "Well." Toledano retorted, "anybody left of Henry Wallace to you is a reactionary." LIBERALS PREDOMINATE IN RADIO AND TV Queried bv moderator Burl. Professor Hodges stated, "If we arc speaking of ihe press, we cannol leave mil radio emd TV. And 1 ihink il's very importanl for us in recognize that the impact there is basically lihered. Commi'llleltors both on radio and TV, as liberals, dominate." In answer to Hardy Hurl's request that panelists name the outstanding liberal commentators, Professor Hodges named Edward I'. Murrow and Erie Sevareid de Toledano added the name of Elmer l);i\ is. Moderator Burt read the quotation of Mt. James Reston, Washington Bureau chief of the New York Times: "Washington reporters emd commentators have been consistently ahead of lhe Democratic leadership emd politicians in digging up the facts and criticizing the contradictions emd mistakes of the Eisenhower administration." "Mr. Reston stales." continued the moderator, "'Il weis the press and not ihe' Democrats who alerted the country io the dangers of the administration's Quemoy and Matsu poliev. The Democratic peirlv acquiesced in giving the Presidenl authority to use force to defend those islands.' Now that's the end (Continued on Page 64) I'M TS FORI M NKWS. \ovembe 1955
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