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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 051. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/610.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 051. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/610

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 051, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/610.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 051
Transcript live up lo their obligations. We think this is a very fine record. Hurleigh: There is no rfonht about il Senator, thai it is a fine record. Itut, on this question of thi- new code and the fact that it has to be established, do yon think the United State--, as some people are saying, hy agreeing to an ex posl facto law at the INeurenhurj; War Crimes Trials, thus being with lhe Soviet Union in trying criminals—or trying as criminals prisoners captured during the war with Nazi Germany, that we are today in a verv vulnerable position because ot that? Thurmond: I don't think so. I think the Neurenburg trials were on an entirely different theory. There's where a commander, for instance, mav have ordered a hundred prisoners shot, or he may have ordered hundreds of prisoners starved or placed in raves, or committed other sadist ie and brutal arts which would not fall at all into this category. I don't think there is any similarity at all between them. Hurleifih; But Senator, we have seen the pictures and we have had the atrocity cases as presented by a General whose name I do not recall at tbe moment, but it was in the headlines. Tbe General who brought back lhe report on atrocities, showed through these pictures that hundreds of South Koreans and some Americans were actually in trenches, had been shot and half-covered wilh dirt righl there. This, to me, must be a war crime. Thurmond: Undoubtedly it was. I'n- doubtedly there were many WaT crimes, hut as von know, the Korean War was brought to a close, ami thc manner in which thc truce was arrived at did not meet thc approval of many people. Hut yet. the truce came. And. as a whole 1 think llie American people approved of the truce. Hut there, we did nol obtain total surrender ;.- wc did in World War Tl. This was a truce so to speak in fact. 1 presume it's the onlv war in which this country was ever engaged lhat it did not win straight out. and. of course, there is a difference of opinion as to whether wc should have won it. Personally, 1 think wc should have pursued the Communists in Korea earlier and should have won the war. Now. after it gol as far as it did. after President Eisenhower became president, then as to whether or not it was wise to make the truce at the time is another question, and I'm inclined to think possibly that the President acted wisely at that time. 1 did not agree wilh former decisions, 1 think wc should have gone on and defeated the Red Chinese and North Korean-; earlier in thc war when ^e could have done so. And I think 'hire \s no question about it—we could nave done so. Hurleighi Our board of judge- has se- fected three prize-winning questions siih- tnJUed by our listeners. "Should SOme- '■iini: be done, Senator Thurmond, lo Create a policy wherein victims of torture "ml brainwashing will be treated as caa- UaJties of war ami not as traitors?" Thurmond: I thoroughly agree that they should not he treated as traitors and thc policy will he that the Defense Department will consider the facts of each case individually, ami 1 am sure that the amount of coercion will he considered in each circumstance. Hurleifih: Now the second question: "\\ hat group or individual decides lhe breaking point of a prisoner of war. Senator Thurmond?*1 Thurmond: The breaking point with different individuals is altogether different, and this will have to he determined hy the individual man and if his integrity and his conduct during war is questioned, then after the war is oxer this would lie determined by investigation and he would certainly he given the right to present witnesses, ant! he given the opportunity to explain thc circumstances under which he acted. I f there was coercion, of course, he would not be punished. Hurleighi Here is the third question: "Senator Thurmond, do you believe lhat a uniform code of conduct should be established for United States civilians who also may become prisoners of the enemy?" Thurmond: This code that has been established could well be used for civilians. In fact, in this day of nuclear weapons, when bombs, in the event we should have a war, could he dropped in our own country, the very principles of this code could well be used for civilians, because we must all feel an obligation to be patriotic and to help our country reveal no information that would assist the enemy or that would harm our comrades. Do It Yourself and Do It Better By Holx-rl W. Johnson t'.fioirman of the Board, Johnson iV: Johnson America's great new "do-it-yourself" movement has become a phenomenal multi-billion dollar industry. But the idea, nl course, is nol new. Our forefathers had im plumbers l<> yell for einel they solved their municipal problems in a town meeting. They settled llieir disputes anil made their own rules ami laws on the spot with llieir fellow townspeople—at what we call today llie "grass- reieeis" level—and it worked. The time- honored svsiems of house-raising and volunteer fire departments sprang oul of a determination lo progress and "put oul our own fires." However, as our nation grew in com- ple\ilv we became prone to call in "somebody else." We became more and more accustomed lo letting "George do it"—and to paying the piper. Even labor and management slipped into the lazy habit of letting "George do it" by running lo lhe government for decisions on picayune differences. For instance, actually there are no problems of capital, leilior and management ilieet are incapable of solution. There are onlv incapable, impatient or unwilling capitalists, labor leaders, or management representatives. ONLY DISCORD MAKES THE HEADLINES Only the discordant elements make the headlines and bring strife into public view, whereas the tens of millions of Americans who work in harmony with one another each day are usually ignored by the press and the Congress. These million- have succeeded in working onl llieir problems and relations at ihe local level. They have done ii themselves. But the few incompetent or petu- Iei nt lines who have given up this effort an- the ones who influence legislation. anel Ihis very legislation frequently results in limiting lhe freedom of thc majority. lt has often been said that you cannot legislate morality, and people have pointed to the Volstead Act to prove it. If this is true, it is equally true lhat business morals and ethics do not lend themselves readily lo legislation. So when government fails to cure an ill or sharp practice, large or small, it can lead to et social revolution like the do-it- yourself crusade. John Doe is now demonstrating lhal if prices are too high, he can and will do it himself. So if TV repairmen, automobile overhaulers. plasterers, electricians, plumbers, carpenters and painters hike llieir talis beyond the reach of the average householder, the net result will lie to make handymen out of millions of amateurs. Thus the trend to Big Government and big unions as a solution for local problems may prove to be self-defeating. The machinery and personnel of these overloaded organizations are costly to maintain. Their very existence gives rise to demagoguery and inspires law-making in favor of discordant minorities. This is not only a vole-gelling technique. It's also a way to grab more money out of the taxpayer and duespayer's pocket. Perhaps in the future ibis new generation of Americans will look less to Congress lo solve social and wage problems, and will find the patience anil the courage to do it themselves—do it locally—do it wilh justice—do it far less expensively—and do it better. nber, 1955 FAl TS FORI M NKWS. November, 1955 Page I')
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