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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
File 043
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 043. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/602.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 043. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/602

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 043, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/602.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 043
Transcript change of a large number of goods. Among the twenty items exportable from India during the first year of the agreemenl are jute goods, tea, coffee, tobacco, spices, shellac, wool, hides, and skins, essential oils, coir yarn and ropes, live animals, chemical films, and hooks. Among the thirty-nine items available for export from Russia are wheal, bailey, crude petroleum and petroleum products, timber and paper, optical goods, dyestuffs, chemicals, medicines, printed matter, film, and a wide range of in- dustrial equipment, machinery and machine tools. Ineliei s imports from Russia were valued at *R2.3 million (aboul $480,- 000) in 1950-51, R13.8 million in 1951- 52. and R2.4 million in 1952-53. Exports lo Russia during those three years eun,niiiied lo I! 13.4 million. R6.7 million, and R8.5 million respectively. PRESS AGLOW OVER COMPACT This agreement is doubtless of great political emd psychological importance, for both India and lhe USSR. Leading Indian newspapers have therefore hailed ihi- compact in glowing terms. The Bengali Ananda llazar I'alriha of Calcutta stressed in an enthusiastic leading article Russia's willingness to send ma- chinery and to give technical assistance to the unskilled Indians, And since W est- ern experience' heis already shown lhal the best capital equipment e'ein be useless in India because of the hick of native skill, il meiv well be that lhe Russian teachers will be permanent in India, as thev once were in China, and that ihey may repeat the Chinese lesson there. Another Indian paper, th*' Hindu Ted "I Delhi, on the other band stressed the fen 1 lhal the agreement adopted the Indian rupee as the unit of account and that thus llussiei was the first great power to acknowledge India's sovereign currency. This was valued by the paper as a great success in prestige. In other words. India hailed the agreement not only as ei commercial progress, but as a national victory. Ilussian commercial policy hit indeed llie target. Yet, analogies with the beginnings of Russia's battle for China cannol be removed from the student's mind, In lhal case. Dr. Sun-Yal-sen beiel invited lhe Russians to help esteeb- lish China's national mighl through a Russian-trained Chinese army. The Russians came and actually never left, until China became fully subservient to the Soviet Union. Russia has not stopped courting the Western European democracies. Agreements with France, England, Italy, the Scandinavian countries, the Benelux area are still the order of the day in spile' eef Russia's unmitigated hatred of emd opposition to any Western bloc such as the Council eel Europe, or the European Coal and Steel < eeininimiu . not lo mention the Marshall Plan which they sabotaged from its very beginning. Sensing eco- nomic difficulties in England, the Soviets did not hesitate to come forward with grandiose offers as at the time of the Foreign Ministers' Conference in Berlin in February, 1954, when the present Russian Foreign Trade Minister Kaba- nov submitted to a British trade delegation in Moscow orders to the tune of $1,120,000. Without doubt, such offers, even if they do not become contrails, leave' ei deep impression on lhe business world in any country, and this is perhaps the main reason why they were made. Other Western countries received similar "favors ' from lhe Soviet I nion. The intention is clear. The Russians want to use such foreign treide lo wean lhe Western countries from their American ally. Beyond that they try to break the American export controls which is evident from the lisis of g Is thev submitted lee lhe' British. These lists contained goods that could not be shipped to the Soviets under the present mutual defense eissisl- ance system. The Russians doubtless be- live that, with the end of American economic aid to Europe in sight, thev will be able to play the field again strong!\ and they don't want to delay tbe start. Very striking, however, are the Russiein attempts to conquer South America through trade. Two Latin Vmerican countries have recently concluded trade agreements with the USSR for the firsl time in their national existence: Argentina in August, 1953. and Uruguay in February, 1954. The Argentine agreemenl is lhe lirsi Soviel trade agreemenl in Latin America. This agreement clearly shows ih*' craftiness emd ihe Machiavel* fian disguise by which the Russians try lo establish a political beachhead through the friendly way of commerce. There are then four different groups of countries where the USSR tries to infiltrate ils power through foreign trade. Firstly, the plan area of the satellites where the operation was fully successful, then the Near East and India where there is a very successful beginning: thirdly, the Old West where economic crises ina\ ARE YOUR FRIENDS THINKING PEOPLE? Set them to thinking! Gel ilieir answers to Facts Forum poll questions ami forward the results lu IIS. l.cl us know he>w many voters em- represented ami the total number of "yes" anel "no" voles nn each question. Excellent for group meetings, loo! Try il anil see if this doesn't stimulate discussion <>f current i--en's. Let's retire General Apailij ! pla\ into the hands of the Russian schemers, and finally the Latin American countries where virgin ground was just broken. The question may well he asked: W by do these countries conclude trade agreements with the Soviet Union? The Soviet record is, after all, obvious. The answer cannot be given in one statement; for the reasons are different for the various nations. But it is safe to say that each nation hopes that it will be spared the extreme, though the basis for such hope is not rational; on the other hand each such nation is always driven to the Russians by some emergency. This emer- gency, whichever it may be, has always been cleverly understood and exploited to the full by the Russians. Economic difficulties in England make English businessmen amenable to Russian approaches which arc onlv too gladly forthcoming; similarly, the difficulty to find a market for its products and a cheap source of supply drive's Argentina into Soviet hands: Indian independence and indigence find the Russians ei- teachers and psychological and economic supports; lhe Arab world may teike ei similar view. The satellites were under Russiein military occupation, hut with Germany's destruction at the end of lhe Second World War Russia was a logical power to turn to. All these arc possible answers to the query at issue. IS SOVIET GOLD DANGEROUS? A last problem of Russian foreign trade should be considered. That is the question of Soviet gold. Does Soviet gold, as em instrumenl of foreign trade quite independent from the Soviet treaty system, constitute a danger to the Western World? Not too much can be said about this issue. A leu ihings, however, are certain. The Soviets have, so far, not used gold as an instrument of economic warfare. Their gold production is a matter of estimate; nor is much known about the extent of Russian gold deposits, especially in thc Lena and Kolyma regions. Soviet gold sales have recently taken place in the free markets of Europe, including London: but there is no report of disturbances of the market through Russian gold sales. The question of how much Russia would benefit from a rise in the price of gold and whether she would benefit more than such an underdeveloped area eis the Union of South Africa is therefore difficult to answer. Yet, the imme- diate problem here is whether Russian gold does not make its way into the American Treasury. It is quite likely, considering lhe low cost of remelting. that Soviet gold freed of the hammer- and-sickle emblem is shipped to the United States by Russia's European I'M |s FORI M NEWS, Vovembi ■ 1955 Page 11
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