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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 042. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/601.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 042. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/601

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 042, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/601.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 042
Transcript well as by a strong decline ol llieir standard of living, at least until this structural change and the consequent integration into the Soviet orbit are fully completed. The Russians will not worry about all this, since they look on the Sn\ iet plan area as something similar to a war economy where the citizens' welfare is nothing compared to the state's defense. The feelings of the subjected nations are of course a different matter which the democracies will do well to remember. REDS CONQUER THROUGH TRADE For the time being, the world must realize that the USSR has conquered the satellite area through its foreign trade policies. Thc nexl question is therefore whether Russia's conquest through foreign trade is on the march elsewhere. The answer is, alas, positive. The Russians have found their new weapon a good one. and are determined to use it to the fullest degree, whereby they discriminate with infernal instinct between their victims and apply the medicine in different doses. W bile Slalin was still philosophizing aboul lhe two separate world markets— the Capitalist and the Communist—the Soviet government invited representatives of both from all over the world to an international economic conference at Moscow in April. 1952. From all reports thi- conference must have been a rather smooth and "bourgeois" affair under the chairmanship "I \lr. Nesterov, the president of the Chamber of Commerce of the Soviet Union. Here, the Soviets proclaimed to all who wauled lo listen their readiness to trade with any nation that wanted to enter into commerce with the USSR. The Russians soon found that there WIDE WORLD PHOTO Lord Boyd Orr of Britain. Nobel Peace Prize winner, 1949. was more of a response' than perhaps even they had expected. Respectable Hritishers like John Boyd Orr cheered enthusiastically, the South .Americans lent a willing ear, the Near East and Central Asia seemed ripe victims. The Soviets of course realized that the game' here would not be as easy as with the satellites and that tbe approach would have to be different, but they set out to work immediately. Since they are not in a hurry and are used to waiting many years if necessary, as in the case ol China, where the battle took twenty- five years, they will be satisfied in the beginning with moderate results, much more moderate than in the plan area, eis long eis they gel re-ults. For tlie democracies, however, everj Russian success is a tocsin of danger which must not be ignored. Disaster is bound to come, un- D PHOTO One of the new Volga automobiles nearing completion at the Molotov Auto Works in Gorky, Soviet Russia, where it will reportedly go into full-scale production next year. The car has automatic oiling, an automatic gearbox, and a rear seat that lets down to form a bed. less the Russian conquest through trade is not brought to a halt in due lime. Some of the new Russian successes shall be recorded here; but for all of them it is an established facl lhat the Russians are hardly interested in the economic advantages that might come to them from their new foreign Ireule con- nections, but much rather in the establishment of et political hold on their new trade partners. The Near East, the Arab world, has eilweivs been of special interest to thc Russians. Two nuijor trade agreements are noteworthy in this respect, the Egyptian-Soviet Payments Agreement of November, l'15'i. einel the Lebanese-Russian Trade emd Payments Agreement of June. 1954. The latter agreement is rather elaborate and provides for an exchange of goods in each direction in tlle amount of Ll.lt) million.* The Soviets will deliver industrial goods; and the Lebanese agricultural products. This agreement also contains through its special handling of the most-favored-nation clause a Soviet recognition of the Arab countries as a whole large unit, an idea from which some day not only the Arabs bul also the Soviets may draw profit. The agreement also ties the method of establishing the exchange rate between the ruble emd the Lebanese pound lei the gold content of the ruble, and makes the- ruble ibis wav for once an international gold-based currency, quite contrary to its usual merely domestic function. This may have no practical -ignifieeitice. but il rev feels once more' lhe independent and arbitrary way in which the Russians see fit to arrange their economic and financial relations with their various trade partners. Yet, the two Near Eastern agreements pale in the light of the Russo-Indian trade agreement which constitutes a significant milestone on Russia's road to conquest On December 2, 1953, Russia and India concluded a trade and payments agreement which will run for five years, after which it can be extended by negotiations which must begin three' months before Ihe expiration dale. Roth parties have agreed to give one another prefer- ential treatment in shipping anil other facilities, lius-iei will render technical assistance on the installation and operation of equipment thai ii supplies, ei clause that reminds very much of the agreements with ihe satellite plan area. All payments are to be made in Indian rupees; for this purpose, the State Bank of Russia will maintain accounts wilh the Reserve Bank of India and one or more commercial banks in India. The balances in these accounts will be con- vertible into sterling on demand. The agreement provides for lhe ex- Lebanese liras. Page iO F\i Is FORI M NEWS, November, 1955
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