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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 040. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/599.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 040. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/599

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 040, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/599.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 040
Transcript Soviet Foreign Trade—Instrument of Conquest by Siegfried Garbuny An economist specializing in the field of inter national trade eunl finance, Mr. Garbuny, who now teaches in V-** York City, formerly served with the l.S.S.K. division ol" the I .S. Office of Strategic Services. In his opinion, "The Soviets -eem to me to use international traele for outrifdtt aggrandizement of their political and military power wherever they can set font." 'llie following testimony by Mr. Garbuny was made before the Senate Interna] Security Subconunitte*—Teisk Foree on Strategy ami Tactics of World Communism. llOMMERCE among nations has always \j been regarded as a means to establish friendly relations among the partners and as a symbol of peace. This ha- been a time-honored maxim: but tlie Soviet Russians have taught the world differently. They have shown tbeit this instrument of peace can easily be turned into a mighty weapon of warfare and into an emblem of slavery. Immediately after their advent to power the Bolsheviks, then led by Lenin, reserved in .April. L918, foreign trade- foi the state as a government monopoly. No private individual was allowed to engage in commerce over the borders. The state through government corporations inside and outside Russia took complete charge of the international exchange of goods. The trade program was simple: only what the Communist state needed for its survival would be imported, the need and demand of the individual Russian citizen was no longer of any concern. Foreign trade would no longer serve to increase the Russian standard of living. True enough, as long as the Russians were busy with their internal alfairs. tlie volume of Russian foreign trade remained relatively small. Yet. the Soviel stale' learned soon that the foreign trade monopoly offered special extra advantages to the Communist regime. It kept the citizens so much better in complete i-ielation and bondage at home, and yet it could be used for economic chicanery abroad. Soviet Russia's foreign exchange dumping maneuvers in the 1920's to upset foreign markets and to obtain muih- ele'-ireal foreign currencies are still remembered. The foreign trade monopoh therefore remained one of the sheet anchors of the Soviet economy, and the decree of 1918 was incorporated in Article 14 of Russia's so-called constitution. POWER THROUGH TRADE It was, however, only after tin- Second ^ orld \\ ar theit the Russians understood tin- formidable dynamic power thai they could unleash through foreign trade on their road to conquest. Commercial poller became therefore a vigorous part of their general foreign policy. Afler World Weir 11 a systematic effort was undertaken to conquer not only by arms but also by foreign trade. It might be said indeed thai foreign trade became an alternative to armed intervention and propaganda. In conjunction wilh the military and propaganda apparatus -tenuis therefore mew feereign economic penetration eis ei means of conquest. The postwar world suddenly saw Rus- -iee ee- the newest champion of international trade. Theit of course weis something rcedlv sensational. Wilh the voices ol ihe sirens the Russians were now singing the praise of international cooperation. In ;dl their pronouncements, verbal emd written, the Russians were using the terminology of tbe democratic world, -Ire'—ing the sovereignty and the equal rights of edl trading partners as well as the mutual benefits of international trade. All lhe technical terms that we find in lhe commercial treaties of the \\ esterri world were used. Yes, indeed, the Russians became al- most treaty-happy engaging in a multitude of treaties emd trade agreements wherever they could lodge them. In addition, trade fairs wen' sponsored and even a world economic conference could be assembled in Moscow in April. I').")2. And yel. it weis Salem at work. INABILITY TO COOPERATE From the \er\ beginning, in spite of all their efforts, the Russians could never conceal their total inability to collaborate in foreign commerce on an international plane. Their role in world political organizations is too well-known to be re* peated here: bul. |ierhei|is ei reminder of their attitude toward the International Monetary Fund and lln- World Hank is -lill in order. To ineike membership in the International Monetar) Fund palatable to the Russians, ihe Bretton Woods Agreements provide lhal ei country whose currencj was only domestically used should imi have io bare ii- financial affairs to the fund authorities. This provision actually referred lo lhe Russian siluation, since the ruble, though allegedly on a gold beisis. is not an international currency and is used only for internal circulation. The Russians could therefore have joined ihe fund without the duty of information about their own financial affairs, a matter in which they have always heen very sensitive; yet, they would slill have retained the privilege to Learn about the' economic -talus eef their colleagues, a point of everlasting Interest to them. Bul even this extraordinary concession was not enough. The Russians did not join. International cooperation would have meant the abandonment of their goal to conquer the world. Cooperation always means eepial rights for all the partners. The Russians would have been forced to become truly democratic and tei give up the fight for the world revolution for which they saw again propitious conditions. This attitude of the Soviets toward the International Monetary Fund and the World Hank is typical of lllissiei's "will to international cooperation" and has been duplicated many times. Even if the l!n—iems join an international economic, or for that matter political organization, it will he for destructive eunl not for constructive purposes. This is inherent in their dictatorial quest for power. We just must realize that Ihe Soviets are incapable of international cooperation in einv sphere. All the mine is it ma e--eil'v in study how thev wielded lhe hammer of foreign trade and whal llieir fulure strategy is going to be, LAST SHAM TO FAIL Thc story of ihe subjugation of Rus- siei s satellites and of the establishment "I puppet regimes is well known, hut less known are their economic consequences. No matter whal their peisi economic setup and orientation were, all satellite countries turned into planned economies with their center in Moscow. The Soviet "plan area " thus created includes now ihe 1 SSI! proper, lied China, North Ileal i Korea, Rumania, Bulgaria, Al- i'.ini.i. East Germany, Poland. Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Mongolia. To keep up appearances, eill these countries heul so feir economic plems of their own. well attuned of course to the Su\i,'t five-year plan; bul there is now substantial evidence lhal even this hist sham will fail, eunl thai lhe Inline S.>\ i<-t five-year plan will also cover ihe satellite economies, which will then be in form as well eis in fen i lliis-iem dependencies. Page 38 F \' TS FORUM NEWS, November, 1955
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