Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
File 037
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 037. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/596.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 037. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/596

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 037, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/596.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 037
Transcript ment. It is a dangerous movement. Mergers are inimical to the national economy, or may be, and particularl) to the smeill business community, precisely lo the extent thai they result in a lessening of competition eiml in the growth of monopoly. That such anti-competitive effects arc (lowing from the current merger activity cannol be denied. The "iil\ question is the degree to which tneleiv's mergers lessen competition eunl create monopolies. Economic concentration creates a serious competitive problem, whether it results from a merger between leaders in the industr) or from a series of mergers among a group of lesser companies. Tin' primary characteristic of the merger movement now being experi- 1'iiiaal. however, i- lhe consolidation of large companies. The soundness "I existing competitive conditions musl I"' epic-- tioned when, as i- happening frequently ai ibis lime, iwo or more blue chip companies in' forced In merge in order to compete more effectively wilh their greal rivals—their giant rivals. What chance for sun i\:il do the man) thousands of smeill businesses have under such conditions? In my opinion the outlook for small business can only grow darker as the strung get stronger through mergers and thus increase their advantages over the smeill. 'I he evils inherent in unrestricted merger activity are serious. The) demand prompt eiml effective action to curb the current trend toward economic con- centration. Every citizen, no matter how weak, every business, no matter how small, must be permitted to enter freely an\ market and once within to compete mi just emd equal terms wilh those that are already there. Only by such action can the market place remain free .nul accessible and consequentl) beneficial to the nation consumers, producers and merchants alike. To curb tbe growth of monopoly brought ahiiiii b\ mergers it is essential that federal agencies responsible for existing anti-monopoly legislation, more aggressively enforce such legislation. There are loopholes in existing legislation theii should he closed, and lhe 1955 session of Congress moved in that direction. More important though tlutn new legislation is a conscientious effort to enforce existing legislation. I nfortun- ately, lhe Federal Trade Commission and thc Department of Justice, the two agencies specifically charged with the respon- sibility of enforcing anti-trust legi-lei- tion, have been derelict in the performance of their duties. In fact, this administration is so greatly controlled by past employees of big business anil so wrapped up in big business philosophy that official sanction has been given to a growing disregard of the dangers of the merger movement. and a growing disregard of legislation already mi the books designed to prevent monopoly expansion. There must be a correction of ibis situation if small business is lo be given ample protection. STATUS QUO PEACE (Continued from Parte 'Ml mendous successes by their "cold weir' techniques. he Al firsl they won Eastern Europe and ur parts of Asia, by crass violations of their pledges eil 'i alta emd Potsdam. Then they seized control of China. The) probed in Korea, eunl were partially turned back but this truce settlement proved nol a defeat for them, hut a basis for further success. Their greatest -ingle achievement 1ms come after the Korean truce, ll is the tremendous success of their drive for neutralization of potential enemies. 'I hey have concentrated eill their efforts to -plil eipeni ihe democratic free world alliance, eunl Iii -lice greal portions eiweiv from it into lhe uncertain sialus of neutrals. And their success in thi- has lain truly sensational. \n wonder lhe Communists ein- striving fm- "relaxation of ten-inn-" eunl peaceful coexistence ! Every month lhal passes, their police control over iln- slave-victims in their satellites i- strengthened eunl made more secure. Ever) conference thai is held fesidi- ;„ either advancing their territorial L-ains. or in securing sonic added measure of agreement from the free u"Hd |„ |,.| them hold in peace whal ''icy bene alread) stolen. Every recent development in the cold war heis added lri the rush of uncommitted peoples [pward neutralism. Whal can the Krem- '"i pei--ihh conclude excepl lhal their ixber. I"55 l'\< |v FORUM NEWS, Sovember, 1955 method is successful, and that they slueulil continue it just as it is? Very soon, now, the problems of Asia are once again to be made the subject of "negotiation"- first at Geneva, on the ambassadorial level, and then at the I nited \etliiilis. Whal we must insist upon is that our friends ineike doiihK emphatic lln1 policy they bene repeatedly pledged themselves to pursue namely, lhe liberation of North Korea. Wheil is lhe use or sense of talking with the Communists about slill more concessions l<> he made to them? Win should lhe free world talk aboul giving up Quemoy emd Matsu, or about the steitus of Formosa, or aboul lhe possible admission of Red China in the I nited Nations? These are topics thai should never even be raised for discussion. The real problems in Asia are the withdrawal of the Red Chinese aggressors from North Korea, eunl the abso- lute ending of their aggressive thrusts In Indochina. The basic problem is the roll-back of the Iron Curtain from the areas which it has illegally engulfed. Peaceful coexistence would he no problem il the Communists would withdraw lieuk into Russia whence thev came; if they would slop living to undermine free peoples by infiltration, sub- version, emd propaganda; emd if they would start lo dismantle the huge war machine by which free nations eire kept under constant threat. We are lold by some people lhat the Communists also are' fearful of the free world, ami that some or perhaps many of their hateful measures are under- teikin simply from a mistaken view of the need for their own self-defense. If thi- i- really ei feulor in their thinking. I eun -ure that there will be no problem in ".him: them sound reassurances. In thc first place, it is a simple fact that the democracies have an excellent record for keeping the promises which thev have made. All the Communists need to do is to read the record, and they will find tbat this is line. In tbe second place. Presidenl Eisenhower h.i- convincingly demonstrated ih.' desire of the 1 nited States tei live in peace, if il eem lie done ill el manner consistent with American ideals of decency and freedom. The Communist leaders themselves have indicated they accept these assurances. NO SACRIFICE TOO GREAT What wc have above all to fear is our own In-- nf honest perspective, on the free side of the linn Curtain. Too easily, we accepl the status quo as something already existing and forget thai il represents ihe greatest evil force of slave conquest in the entire history of lhe world. ll i- simple incredible to try te. make "peace" with thc Communisl conquerors on lhe hasi- of "leaving well enough alone." We- have no alternative to making every sacrifice thai may he necessary lo win the captive peoples back to freedom. No step -hurt of that is civilized. No step short of tbat is even safe. Page 35
File Name uhlib_1352973_v004_n010_037.jpg