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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 033. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/592.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 033. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/592

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 033, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/592.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 033
Transcript 3H f~s,.. ILC IS. Pacific Ocean : :: MARSHALL * " ';. GltBfRr IS Are. added lo US<': under St.lire', did. ICemmem,! dee rning ones and repeat- nlly lhat it is the self- lace, called ■s preached lo the other r Nehru of :e? esidenl I i-- s found still eace of mu- each side, nodern war. ms in every onflict, 'Ihis iv delivered neva, eiml II expecl will fur dealing i of Asia. everj cITort in avert war r nation has in any oilier and we are rrihle effects ur economy real problem cc. hut how mmunist ag- thc Russian rom Geneva November, 1955 claiming lhal the "summit" conference was a success. From their poinl of view il weis ei success because llu- whole tenor of the meeting weis to turn attention away from Communist aggression and toward the "search for peace." Now, what is the difference? Ihe difference is thai when we are deeding wilh Communisl aggression our whole purpose i- In bring it to an end and In roll it back to the poinl from which it started. But when our aim is simply lo achieve peace," our thinking is directed toward establishing ei new compromise on the basis of the stains quo, jusl eis weis done at Panmunjom. The question I would like to raise i- Ihis: Arc the free nations ready and willing lo make "peace" with the Communists on lhe basis of Idling them keep the areas of the world they have seized and which they now hold as cap. tives and satellites? Or are they determined to uphold wilh deed-, and mil merely wilh words lhe right of these captive peoples to l.e restored to freedom? In mv judgment ihis is the greal central issue of our lime. I do nol think il can be avoided. When lhe issue is fen id. 1 believe only one answer can !"■ 5viven to it—namely, that Ihe freedom "f lhe captive peoples must lie restored. STATUS QUO PEACE IMPOSSIBLE I do not believe thai a "status quo peace" is practical or possible. To leave North Korea, and the other captive areas, under Communis! control is a craven solution thai would never he accepted. It will not he accepted by the people of Korea, and il will not he accepted hv the eighi hundred million other people whose liberties are now strangled by ihe Communisl police slate. At this lime I do not intend to repeat what I have often said before about iln- horrible treatment to which our people in North Korea are being subjected, The importanl consideration is thai the) are nol being allowed to live as free, decent citizens subjeel hi their own government. Instead, tney are being ground down into slavery for •lie benefit of ihelr foreign masters, snd ai the same time the whole Korean face in the north is being gradually Wiped mu ami replaced wilh Red Chinese settlers. Whal the Communists are living to do ■n North Korea, and eilso In other are'eis Under llieir control, is to settle lhe problem of possession nine' emd feili'WT ill 'lair feivor. hv destroying all opposition and grinding their own totalitarian pal tern deeply into ihe souls of lhe people. Now. 1 sen lhat ii is impossible for "lis tu he' accepted. When the statesmen °f the world meel in a top-level conference and agree among themselves in FAl Is FORI M NEWS,November, 1955 "postpone" the1 issue and to "relax tension" so that the status quo will not be disturbed, al leasl for lhe time being, Ihey are simply giving to the' Communisl dictators lhe chance thev want to continue this process of exterminating all opposition and fixing their grip permanently upon these conquered areas. There arc endless arguments in lhe capitals nf lie free world a- in whether ui mil "linn- is on lhe side' of lhe democracies" in the cold war. We know absolutelj thai lime is nol on the side of the eight hundred million non-Russian peoples who eire held captive under the slave rule of their Communisl masters. Every day lhat pa>scs is a new agony for them. \\ h.ii musl these people ihink when they hear over llieir melius that the rulers of the Kremlin arc coming home from international conferences Feeling very well satisfied wiih the results? Whal musl thev iliiiik when they learn lhal lhe' leaders of the- democracies are making efforts on their part to "relax tensions" in other words, to leave the situation as il now exists? What does coexistence have lo offer for them? COMMUNISTS WILL SEEK NEW CONQUESTS My second reason for believing that ii i- impossible for us to accepl ;i status quo kind of peaceful coexistence is thai lhe Communisls themselves will nol abide hy ii. They never intend to remain where they arc. hui always to push forward to new conquests. They make agreements one day, onlv lo break ih.in the- next. Our experience is crowded wilh examples. For us in Korea the' greatest example REDS BUILDING FOR SNEAK ATTACK WARNS RHEE—Korean President Syngman Rhee in July, 1»54, told a joint session of Congress that Soviet strategy for world conquest is to lull Americans to a "sleep of death by talking peace. . ." Vice-President Nixon and former House Speaker Martin in background. lies right here in our own country. The Communisls made a truce at Panmunjom, hui they starled breaking il even before lhe ink was dry. Nobody denies that these violations are flagrant, violent, and constant. What. then, is the value of a truce, if we keep il. hut they do nol? Another instance is found in Indo- china. Fifteen months ago, lhe Communists agreed upon a solution of the war in Indochina which gave them ei large part of whal ihey were demanding. Hut even though they profited great!) From llieet agreement, they have heen breaking il e\ri since'. And they are' still breaking il today, while' they are ei^kinu that slill additional agreements should In' made. Now lcl us look at an even more recent example. The heads of slalc of feeur major powers wenl to Geneva in July lo discuss the' issues lhat separate them. The leaders of the democracies knew lhal Kussiei heis violated the 'I alta Agreement, the Potsdam Agreement, and the Panmunjom Truce Agreement. 1 in -ure theit whal thev heul iii mind chiefly was to find some wav of gelling lhe Russians lo keep lhe promises they have already made. (In ihe other hand, the' Communist delegation went to Geneva with the aim of "relaxing tensions" lhat is. of per- -ii.iiling the democracies to accept conditions ei- they eire now. emd not to cause emv trouble about lhe violations of llii' pasl emd present. Well, wheel has happened'.'' No sooner was lhe Geneva Conference adjourned than the Communists demanded thai new leilks must commence aboul lhe problems in \-ia. And what '.he Communists are proposing is theit even still further concessions musl he made in ihem in relation to the steitus of For- mosei. Mwavs and forever the pattern is exactly the same. The' Communists whip up pressures eenel demand new conces. -inn- as lln' price Inr relaxing lllelll. \- soon a- this price is paid, new pressures arc whipped up. and new prices eni' exacted. We do nnt need in look in the pasl for proof lhal llii-- i.- their technique. We look instead al the present, and eet their em lined program fnr tlle fulure. They do nol even try in conceal theii strategy. They simpl) lake ii for granted thai the free peoples have be- come -n -nfl thai no resistance mav he expected. PRESENT METHODS SUCCESSFUL FOR REDS There i- -lill a third reeiseen whv 1 d" mil ihink ii is possible lo buy a peace from lhe Communists, even at the impossible c'-l nf abandoning their captive victims In them. And ihis reason is lhal the Communists eire winning tre- (Continued on Pat
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