Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
File 030
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 030. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/589.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 030. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/589

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 030, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/589.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 030
Transcript Beginning of integration in 1954 in the District's McKinley Tech- r. col High School. A school official stated some 400 Negroes enrolled in this high school's previously all-white student body. supply more classes for retarded children. Thc need for that has leea'n brought trite. focus much more clearly through integration, and this year we ein- establishing quite a num- lecr of additional classes for backward children. PRINA: Then vou do have intellectual segregation in the schools* CORNING: I ll'ill'l like' In 1J — <- llie ueilil. sir. l.lll llll'le- lias always been emit there w ill be increasingly, probably, grouping of individuals to make certain ilieil the very gifted ones eem move on as rapidly, and as far as they are able to go, and eil lie' same time take care of the lower, more slowly moving children as well. HOCKltS: In general, l>r. Coming, whal was the re action of white parents whose children had ii [Negro teacher lee>t year? CORNING: Then' were no objections that reached my level. Miss Rogers. I lienl no complaints eileout the assignment of Negro teachers. I did hear grumblings al first. I have quite ei number of letters on file from parents who say lhat originally ihey were unhappj eit the prospect of having a Negro teacher for their children, lent now they are singing praise's of those teachers; anil, while there may have heen more dissatisfaction than I am aware "I. none of it arrived eit my office. PRINAi Dr. Coming, I understand that many, if not all. of the secondary schools have virtually cut out their social programs—dances, etc. Now, do you think this i* a healthy situation? And. if not. have you urccel iheet these social functions he resumed? CORNING: They haven't been entirely eliminated. I think there has heen a slowing down of the program of see. ieil activities in those schools which are' pretty largely integrated. I think, however, lhat eis lime goes on even lhat will met he- sn line, because in cities where there is an integrated school system eunl heis been lot years, social activities on. In mv former experience before coming hack to Washington, we had that situation emd no particular proh- lems developed, ROGERS: l>r. Corning, what do you do in tin* case where parents come to your office and demand or »e-ek ei child's transfer to another school? What kind of questions do you a-k them? Ju-t what would the give and take he oee (heel? CORNING: Well, I'm afraid I couldn't put anv of those into patterns because the reasons for requesting transfer are so numerous. There an' always parents who have requested transfers long before integration einel in some instances they've heen granted particularly on doctor's certificates— for a health reason, or if a course i- given in one school that i- not given in another. We do have a bi-racial committee thai now passes on all requests for transfer, particularly those having to do with the racial problem. The questioning depends somewhat on what the reason for it is. The permissions are- nol given just on a racial basis, hut if there is some legitimate reasorl beyond a racial prejudice one, quite a number of those requests have been granted. PRINAi Is that the so-called "hardship" case that yoo are speaking of? CORN INC: That is right. I*KINA: In other words, it does not work this way as I've read—that if a person's ehild is in a sehool when' he is in a great minority—let's say he's a white child in a eolored sehool in which there are very few whiles-, his parents would tiol he aide to go to you or to thr Hoard and ask for a transfer if there was a vacancy in another school? CORNING: That person would ho required to put his request in writing and submit il to this bi-racial committee that goes over all of the facts involved in the case, an.l ij there is legitimate reason over ami above jnst thr racial reason, in all likelihood the request would he "ranted. But] that is all handled hy this bi-raeial committee and they also, in addition to these written reports, see and interview *' greal many people who come in. You might he interested in I that connection lo know that the requests that ivcli;n reived llii- year on the hardship hasis are onlv a handful compared lo those which wc received lasl vear. ROGERSi Well, do you think lhat is because school has just gotten underway? CORNING: Well, at least last year we had them to a mm!' larger degree before school got underway. We will hav" more afler school slarls. no doubt. PKIN A: 11 would he normal that you would get tl"'| hulk Ihe first year, wouldn't it? CORNING: Yes, 1 think so. PRINAi Ur. Corning, what about this so-called "on*; way street"? It's pointed out that there are only 1.5 per rent of the white school population now attending schools thai formerly were all eolored. Now is there aBj move afoot to bring that inlo balance; or is there aflJ particular explanation for lhat low figure? CORNING: 1 am nol familiar with thai figure, bul assurfl ing thai il is correct (ami l"m nol questioning it at all) tha' will take care of itself as ihis option plan works on through and as we progress further with ihis program. 111 III I II.II: Dr. Corning, I was particularly interested a moment ago in your percentages regarding the pop"' hit ion of the puhlie schools of the nation's capital. ' believe you said the Negro population i* hi per cenl °{ thereabouts? CORNING: Student population. Ml III.I It.II : Student population, hi per cent. Can ><"! give us the trend of the past, say ten years? That wool* certainly he prior lo the thought of segregation at"1' that is what I am particularly interested in and whethfr this trend might continue. CORNING: From all indications, it will continue and th*" percentage of Negro population will he greater if tin- form?' trend follow-. I can'l give you the exacl figures, bul rough') it"s something like llii-: thai about five years ago for tW firsl lime the Iwo enrollment- in thc two school systems I"* (ami- equal. Theretofore, lhe while population had been •'' a majority. Then lhe following year there were 3,000 n colored than while; the following year 8,000 more colo than while; and it'- been going ri^rhl aboul lhat. on lM curve. HURLEIGH I So. we might say that in another five •" po--ihl> ten \eais. the student population of the pul>"( Schools of the nation's capital could he 73 per c**1 Negro, 2.> per cent white. CORNING: Conceivably, that i- true. Page 28 F\< TS FORI M NEWS, Sovember, 1"'
File Name uhlib_1352973_v004_n010_030.jpg