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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 028. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/587.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 028. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/587

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 028, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/587.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 028
Transcript Beginning of integration in 19S4 in the District's McKinley Tech- r. eal High School. A school official stated some 400 Negroes enrolled in this high school's previously all-white student body. supply more classes fnr retarded children. The need for that has heen brought into focus much more clearly through integration, and this year we are establishing quite a number of additional classes for backward children. PRINA: 'Mien vou do have intellectual segregation in the schools? CORNING: I don't like to use the word, sir, bul there has always heen and there will be increasingly, probably, grouping of individuals to make certain thai the very gifted ones can move on as rapidly, and eis fen ee- they are able lo go, and al the same time lake' care of the lower, more slowly moving children as well. ROGERS: In general. Dr. Corning, what was the reaction of while parents wlio-e children had a Negro teacher last .ear? CORNING: There were no objections that reached my level. Mi-- Ili.L'crs. I had in. complaints aboul the assignment nf Negro teachers. I did hear grumblings at first. I have quite a number nf letters nn file frnm parents who say that originally they were unhappy at the prospect of having a Negro teacher fm- their children, hut now they arc singing praises nf those teachers; ami. while there may have been more dissatisfaction them I am aware nf. none of il arrived at my office. PRINA: Dr. Corning. I understand that many, if not all. of tbe secoiuleer. schools have virtually cut out their social programs—dances, etc. Now, do you think this i- a healthy situation? And. if not. have you urged that these social function- lie resumed? CORNING: Thev haven'l been entirely eliminated. I think there has been a slowing down nf the program nf social activities in those schools which arc pretty largely integrated. I think, however, that a- time goes mi even that will nnt he so line, because in citi.-s where there is an inte- grated school system ami has been for years, social acihiiie- '51. mi. In mv former experience before coming back to Washington, we had that situation and no particular problems developed. ROGERS: Dr. Corning, what do you do in the case where parent- come to your office and demand or seek a child's transfer to another sehool? What kind of questions do you a-k them? Ju-t what would the gi.e and take be on that? CORNING: Well, I'm afraid I couldn't put any of the.-.' into patterns because the reasons fnr requesting transfer are so numerous. Then' em always parents who have requested transfers long before integration—and in some instances they've been granted particularly em doctor's certificates— for a health reason, or if a course is given in one school that is nnt given in another. Page 28 We do have a bi-raeial committee that now passes mi all requests for transfer, particularly those having to do with the racial problem. The questioning depends somewhat on what tbe reason for it is. The permissions an- mil given jusl on a racial basis, hut if there is some legitimate reason beyond a racial prejudice one, quite a number of those requests have been granted, PRINA: Is that the so-called "hardship" ease that you are speaking of? CORNING: That is right. PKINA: In other words, it does not work this way a» I've read—that if a person's child is in a school where he is in a great minority—let's say he's a white child in a eolored sehool in whieh there are very few whites* his parents would not he aide to go to you or to th*' Board anil ask for a transfer if there was a vacancy i-1 another school? CORNING: That person would be required to put his request iu writing and submil il to ihis bi-racial committee that goes over all of iln- facts involved tn the ease, and ij there is Legitimate reason over and above jusl the racial reason, in all likelihood ihe requesl would be granted. Bill, thai is all handled by ihis bi-racial committee and they alsd in addition to these written reports, see and interview 8 greal many people who come in. You might be interested inl that connection to know thai the requests thai we have received this year on the hardship basis are onlv a handful Compared to those which We received lasl year. ROGERS] Well, do you think that is because school has just gotten underway? CORNING: Well, al least last year we had them to a mud] larger degree before school got underway. We will hav* more afler sehool starts, no douhl. PRINA: It would he normal that you would gel ■ ■" hulk the first year, wouldn't it? CORNING: Yes. I think so. PRINA: Dr. Corning, what about this so-called "on** way street"? lt*s pointed out that there are only 1.5 per cent of the white school population now attending schools thai formerly were all colored. Now is there anj move afoot to bring that into balance; or is there anj particular explanation for that low figure? CORNING: I am nol familiar with thai figure, bul assun* ing that il is correct laud l"m nol questioning il at all I tha' will take care of itself as ihis option plan works on through and as we progress further wilh this program. BURLEIGH) Dr. Corning* I was particularly interested a moment ago in your percentages regarding the pop*1' lation of (lie puhlie schools of llie nation'- capital- ' believe you said the Negro population is 61 per cent *,r thereabouts? CORNING: Siudeui population. HURLEIGH) Student population, 61 per cent. Can >'"' give us the trend of the past, say leu years? That woul' certainly he prior lo the thought of segregation an1' that is what I am particularly interested in and wheth** this trend might continue. CORNING: From all indications, il will continue and thf percentage of Negro population will be greater if the forme* trend follow-. I can i give you the exact figures, bul roughlj it's something like ihis: thai about five years ago for tW first time the two enrollments in the two school systems 1>(" came equal. Theretofore, tin1 while population had been '" a majority. 'I hen lhe following year there were ">.lioo ,, eolored than while; lhe following year J!.(Kill more colon''1 than white: and if- been going rijzlil about that, on th* curve. HURLEIGH: So, we might say that in another five ''' possibly ten year*, the student population of the piil>'|f Schools of the nation's capital could be 73 per cC INegrO, 2.> per cent white. CORNING: Conceivably, that i- true. KACrs I'OIU M NKWS. W.-m/»
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