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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 020. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/579.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 020. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/579

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 020, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/579.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript promise and should be encouraged to take scientific courses and go on to college. While scholarships and fellowships are growing rapidl) in number, we hem- pitifully inadequate means of discovering on a nationwide basis the high school studenl of really high promise, and making il possible' emd attractive to them tei go through the long grind involved in modern scientific training. Russian education has many defect-, but I venture to guess that their system seldom makes that mi-take'. They are putting on new steam jusl when our output of scientists -eem- to be slow ing (low n. Fortunately, some very influential individuals and organizations are working on llii- problem of uncovering real talent, wherever ii is, ami I believe will come up -non with a very promising and well-financed program. But merely sending the promising student to a college or university by no means insures the development of his scientific interests. Institutions thai -eem comparable in oilier respects mav differ widely in the proportion of iheir graduates who go on for higher degrees in science. Advanced leaching, too, may be excellent at one institution. uninspired at another. 7. DRAFTING AND WASTEFUL USE OF YOUNG SCIENTISTS BY THE ARMED SERVICES Under circumstances of serious shortage, it is importanl lhat we make good use of the scientist- and technologists we have. I am sorry to say that the armed services have seldom used the best judgment in their handling eif scientists and students of science. Actually, the armed services might to be more interested than anyone else in conserving and increasing our supply of technical men. Modern wen fare and the production of needed supplies are both highly technological. "Selective Service" should be really selective, making sure that men are assigned lo work that will utilize llieir abilities most effectively in the national interest. We must resist lhe pressure tn insure our safety for lhe next five vi'ars al lhe expense of leaving ourselves weak ten nr twenty \ears from now. Proper use nf our technical manpower needs as careful examination as our over-all defense budgel it-elf. In fairness, it musl he admitted that the military are not lhe onlv people who wasie technical manpower. Some shortsighted industrial concerns hire e_'oeeil research workers and engineers emd then fail to give them adequate facilities and the nontechnical help needed to permit effective use of brains and ability. Such policies, however, have become less tt,Miinon in receni years. 8. INADEQUATE SUPPORT OF FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH The eighth and final threat to applied research is the fait thai research of ibis type heis been tending to outstrip fundamental research, especiall) since the "real German research organizations were destroyed in Hitler's attempt to conquer the world. We should remember thai during the first forty-five years of Nobel Prizes in physics, chemistry, and medicine, only twenty-four were awarded to the I nited States, while Europe received one hundred twenty-three. Germany alone wei- awarded thirty-six. And German scientists were responsible for the discovery of the basic potentialities of alomie fission. We in America have long heen a nation of inventors, but only in recent years have started to become a nation nf scientists. We are gradually learning thai progress in applied research draws continuingly upon a reservoir of basic knowledge. This reservoir, so largely supplied in the pasl from Europe, musl now be largely maintained b) what is dime here in America. To provide the basic scientific knowledge on which tech- nolog) rests, fundamental research in the universities musl be supported by industry, by private philanthropists, emd in part by the government itself. Support by eill three is essential, to make certain thai no one influence will dominate, and thai lhe necessary freedom will prevail. Can business afford lo support work which is abstract, which does not have immediate practical consequences, emd which iln.- nol lead to a product thai can he pul iii a peiekeitja- ami sold al a profit? Can business eifford it? The real question is: Can business afford not to support such work? Certainly without it we will bene losl the seed corn from which applied research grow s. POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS Having sel forth the numerous basic problems involved in maintaining lhe pace "I scientific developmenl. il is time to come to grips wilh ihe Snl question. In terms nf ils importance tn the country, lln- question we face is lhe $64 million question. Thai question is. whal can we do about Ihe need fm- education in science.-- I would like to su| several possibilities. 1. We- cein cooperate in getting better pay and facilitie-s for our teachers, emd particularly for good science teachers. I understand thai mn- school system had forty linn- ,i- nieinv qualified applicants fnr ihe job of leaching English and history as fnr jobs teaching science. Thi- supply-demand situation cannot he ignored in setting salaries. 2. We can cooperate in setting up gnod educational TV centers in our larger cities and making the programs both interesting and informative, ll should he em excellent wav In interest many youngsters in science ami ii- methods. t. \\ e can cooperate in informing our young men and women aboul the opportunities in science and engineering. "lhe National Association of Manufacturers heis an excellent booklet on scientific careers, available for distribution in high schools. We should encourage our high school -indents, before it is loo lelle. to lake the mathematics and other subjects Ihey should have as prerequisites for later scientific study. An appreciation of science—its aims, its accomplishments, its potential- needs io be developed earlv In the school vcar-. If we are to have an adequate supply of scientific personnel, we must recognize the facl thai mathematics is the language- of the scientific worker. Mathematics preparation musl begin long before college; ye-, ii probably should -i.nl well back in the grades. I. We can cooperate in educating the public, both young and iilil. as to the Function and necessity of research and of incentives like our patent system and opportunities for profit, both of which arc essential for encouraging research and progress toward continually higher standards of living. 5. You, ei~ educators, can help discover, encourage, and push almig the really superior minds in our schools; and we, ei- businessmen, can make more scholarships eiml other educational opportunities available to such individuals, who are our nation's mosl valuable a—et. 6. And finally, we can all work toward better understanding of our mutual problems instead of giving voice t" uninformed criticism. I!v recognizing thai both educators and businessmen are vitally interested in the development nl our young people into g I eunl capable citizens, we can ment readily profit frnm one e ther's viewpoints. Through cooperation we can accomplish more than by separate efforts toward similar goals. One thing we can certainly agree upon. Our nation's stature in the years ahead depends in large pail upon whal lakes place in your classrooms, and thai i- especially true in the field of research and technology. The rate of scientific progress can only be in proportion to the ability of man's mind to search out and fathom new truths, to evaluate wisely, to think creatively. Withoul the tools you provide, the in. ni.il disciplines, the background upon which to build, and the study and work habits you inculcate, tomorrow - scientists will be | rly equipped to play their importanl and exalting role. . . . END Page 18 FACTS FOHl'M NKWS. Vovembei /""
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