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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 019. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/578.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 019. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/578

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 019, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/578.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript c, this great s surprising applied re- ing. because nherent; we tion. As the " I think ii of the prob- ts. Research i-etrs mir re- (III per cenl. ed with the s believe the results. Bul ill begin lo be forced to ective profits ml ri-k. research has e a corpora- eirnings. how | ling si. risky eel lhal sne- ind lhal the ilc of .">2 per lee dominate live some re- :ourage busi- , litical lire. ■ lhe adverse I research, I ti\ h v eif lhat j- the logical imis nf these he unhealthy nent lake llu' icre the m er- vate concerns Jmi deserving •Id of public more mi fun- (ban il is nn i governmenl leas in which mil adequat- canl theit. mi' eighteen mosl ■me teas mini' is a construe ie duplication i.-ie science. Hell- s\s|,.M1 (it n lhe (nun "' ess. Socialist^ ir heritage o> this nation I indertake in-1' :\,.,ell,!..i. I"' projects, freedom tn -cck capital ami build plants and facilities, freedom tn earn profits with which lo finance expansion eiml maintain our credit. We must even cherish the freedom to go broke, or how will we know when we are not being efficient, nol serving lhe public well? It is in ihi- atmosphere of freedom that our research eem best flourish. I do not know of any closely-regulated in- dustry that is famous fm- ii- research. This trend toward socialism seems to he slowed down jusl nnw. I.nl I would mil -ay thai the pendulum has swung \ci\ far in lhe oilier direction. Fnr example, a year ago the prices received hv independent producers of natural 5Ms wen- put under tin- control "I tin- Federal Power Commission. This automatically Btopped ei lol of exploration aimed al finding more gas. New gas discoveries have already dropped substantially below levels of earlier years. If peace-time price control is imposed mi ei competitive commodity, such as natural gas, there is no reason why il should not be imposed on other commodities, such eis coal, oil. wheal, or anything else. Willi each step down lhe roeid of governmenl domination we move farther away from iln- wellsprings of mir genius from lhe initiative and daring lhal bene widened our Intellectual horizons and inspired mir actions as well. 5. THREATS TO THE PATENT SYSTEM Another cloud nn lhe horizon nf applied research and 'hi- one elite- seem to la- dissolving has been the threat in our paleni system. Ml of us in industry hope thai lhe attacks of tlie I930's and I940's will nol recur, especially when high research costs mail greater, rather than lesser, incentives. 6. THE SHORTAGE OF TRAINED MANPOWER AND SOME OF THE CAUSES \ sixth major threat tn applied research, and one nn which educators can help greatly, arises from the shortage of trained scientists ami engineers. Tins shortage has heen recognized hv practically everyone who has reaO) studied il. It is due in pari to changes in lhe environmenl of our youlh and in part. I believe, to certain inadequacies 'n our educational system, especially at lhe secondary level. One environmental change ha- hen television, which tends lo make us a nation of spectators instead ol participants. Too often ihe bright young boj whn used to play wilh a homemade crystal radio or a chemical kil is now twirling the knobs mi a TV set. watching questionable programs thai distract him from onn-l i in ! i\. activities. Mislead tiling really educational magazines for boys like the Scientific American and Popular Mechanics of our day, he is attracted by comic books and lurid science fiction, which tend to make the true facts of science seem pale b) comparison, ll will he too had if true science, hen ing produced in television one of the wonders of all time, i- then unable to use this great new medium In tell its own fascinating -tnr\ wilh ihr eeiil eif scientists eiml science leelchcrs. Withoul decrying iln- importance nf pedagogy, I ihink (nan) of .nn public scl I systems plan- ton much emphasis '"i how In leach, and mil enough nn ihe teachers' thorough Understanding nf. eiml enthusiasm fm-. what the) teach, especially in the fields of science. Vnd there ha- been an ominous drop nf 50 per cenl since 1950 in lhe number of 0-en ami women adequate!) trained in science who arc willing in enter secondar) school teaching. Inadequac) nf •*laries fm- science teachers in comparison wilh what in ''"-ti\ offers is. nf course, the main reason for thi-. The shortage of scientists i- resulting in em even greater shortage "' science teachers and thus starting ei \ii-iems circle. Tn these factors i- added the tendency nf many high school "".dents In avoid the hard disciplines nf mathematics. \- .i r''suli. main nf them enter college withoul either the neces- K\i | S FORI M NEWS, \, rtber. (955 senv prerequisites or a vivid interest in science. So the) miss th,. rewarding careers they might otherwise have. ll is also unfortunate lhal many of mir secondary schools feiil lo encourage eunl speed along the really superior minds, either in science or other fields. In my day a bright bo) frequently skipped two or three grades. Ih' weis stimulated by association with his intellectual equals. Freezing him in his eiL'e' group tends to deaden hi- interest by holding him back In the learning pace nf lhe dullards. Today's public school systems eire loo often built around llie mythical en eieiL'i student. In many schools skipping grades is either discouraged or actually prohibited, wilh adverse effects mi the nation's mosl valuable raw material, our potential leaders in all fields nf knowledge. I confess that, while I have menf- these points to groups of scientists eiml engineers, I hesitated lo sav them directly In teachers, who ein- -,, much more familiar wilh the prt-se-ni situation than I am. However, I weis encouraged lo do so by a letter recently received frnm a Midwest teacher, who had read a reporl nf my comments before the American Chemical Society on ibis failure nf many -choeils to encourage and speed along the superior minds. He writes: "M) wife and I. teachers for aboul a dozen years each ami holding five degrees from teachers' colleges and scheeeel- of ediical ie in. cannot agree with vnu enough. 'lhe professors nl education, the school administrators, and the classroom teachers, by ami large, simply don't have anv use for the superior mind. Mosl cannol even recognize ihe superior mind. Many sec in the nonconformist aspeel of lhe superior mind nothing but heretical tendencies. Is il einv wonder then lhal the superior student -non learns lo like- comic books? "Mv wife, a superior firsl grade' teacher, is all the while being lold by her superiors In he less superior. Onlv lasl fall sh,. was told hv her principal thai she could no longer have her first grade students collect non-native rocks, ami thai -he could nn lunger gel reference hunks from lln puhlie library sn lhal these interested students could try In look their rocks up in ihese hooks and find their name-, u-e-. etc Whv? The principal said, 'The sixth grade teacher has complained In me lhat what you arc dning i- supposed to be done in his grade level.' The principal added, 'If you ilo this sort of thing in lln firsl grade, whal will there be lefl to do in lhe upper grades in science?'"!!! ('an miu imagine science running nut nf interesting things at the sixth grade level? I sincerely hope and believe' lhat that is met a typical situation, but it is the observation nf one nf vour number. However, lhe growing number of science fairs ami special science projects shows lhal main schools have a much more forward-looking attitude. \lso, lhe Ne.ii.in.il Science Teachers \ssociation is sponsoring numerous activities along constructive lints. I am glad lo mil.- lhal a new attack mi the problem of lhe gifted -nul.nt is now receiving much attention from certain private schools :iMil suburban high schools. The proposal i- in allow a few selected limit school students in lake- college level courses in science, wilh ihe understanding lhat if they complete such courses satisfactorily and can pass ei comprehensive examination, the) will receive college credit and nol bene- In repeal their elementary science courses. Thi- seems to me to be a major step forward in both saving valuable lime and encouraging gifted students, eunl I heep.- il will |..- inure widely adopted. Another waste of potential scientists i> involved in the fail thai main able young men feel they have neither the lime nor the mone) to go beyond high school. While voca- tional high -tin...Is are an excellent thing fnr main students, I ihink h..iii students ami teachers loo often assume thai the decision nf these students nol tn go nn lo e-olle-ge- is an irrevocable one. Many of them develop real intellectual Page 17
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