Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
File 017
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 017. 1955-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/576.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-11). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 017. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/576

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955 - File 017, 1955-11, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/629/show/576.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 10, November 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 10, November 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date November 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript jjc9 The Importance of Scientific Education by ROBERT E. WILSON Chairman of the Board, Standard Oil Company (Indiana} Delii <r<il nt "ee,/ tinned Convention, National Education Association, Chicago, Illinois, July 1, 1955, Education in this countrj ha- been ei \iied factor iii making the- Vmerican dream come true. Our forefathers postulated that man has individual dignity emd worth; that Wen ein- created free eiml equal, possessed of certain inalienable rights. Since the choice of his own destiny rests "ith each individual, the mind musl be trained to choose Wisely and well, the spirit should he- molded lo acl nobl) ami in ihe common good. ^ So our forefathers reasoned, and linn- has proved them right. A nati .f free men cannol survive withoul education. A nation nf slaves cannol survive with ii provided We define education in il- Inn- sense In include nut only technical <. m 11 ni <'m<- hui the ability In evaluate emd make- s"unil judgments. Free men pursue truth; the enslaved We mil allowed In pursue it. for lhe dictator knows lhal '■ man- mind i- free to learn the truth, he will tear off "i- chains. I believe thai today more than ever before our young People need the opportunity, through education, to become nten and women with the broad outlook with a sure- grasp °I their intellectual heritage, mentally emd morally dis- 'ipliued. and trained to evaluate data and events eunl arrive '" sound dei isions in all aspects of life. Menu Thoreau once seiid. ". . . so with a hundred 'mod- '"i improvements.' There i- an illusion aboul them there ls nol always a positive advance . . . Our inventions are (*onl to be pretty toys, which distracl our attention from Jerious things. They are hut improved mean- In an 1111- "lipniM-el end." I wanl to emphasize eit the outsel this need For educational ''-llama- because mosl of the resl e.l nn address will be devoted to scientific mailers and the need for more and better-trained scientists emd engineers. We musl lake care, however, lhal our emphasis on scientific education does nol '"''nine sn n\ erpetw e'ling lhal We find olll'-ehes neglecting Cultural and spiritual matters and busily constructing a myriad of whal Thoreau called "improved means to an ""improved cm\.". . . SCIENCE AFFECTS EVERYONE , We Anieiiiein- live in a scientific world. We- use scien- !''"■ ami technological developments to reduce back-break- ""-■ labor, to gain shorter winking hours and higher pay. " faise our living -I.md.mis to the world's highest. Thai is whv the scientist's job concerns everybod) \ilally. today's pioneer does nol wear a coon-skin cap or shoulder * rifle. More likely, he i- wearing a laboratory apron and *"elding a stirring rod. He continually finds new lands to 'M'lme in his lesl lulu-. Mi- hunting is done with the 'Hi. r oscope. Ih- seeks new horizons i" the cyclotron. Sei.nii-|s eiml engineers may well take pride in their work ami their pi< 'ring heritage. For il was the engineer, working with lhe businessman, who lamed lhe wilderness wilh steamboats emd railroads who |.: n\ iib-il har- vesters tn cut the prairie grain and feed a growing nation. Engineers harnessed lhe power of rivers and coal, discovered and developed hidden reservoirs of oil and helped 15i\ ■ - Americans high-quality, mass-produced goods. And our scientist- have found new ways to ease pain eiml lengthen lives. The recenl developmenl of ei scrum which bids fair to metke' our children safe from the ravages of polio represents jusl one more outstanding milestone in scientific achievement. A- one doctor said of our main new antibiotics, we nnw have remedies for which there is no known disease! In the past half-century of amazing developmenl and change in this country, erne of the mosl dramatic shifts has been in the sources thai suppl) our expanding needs for energy. \i the turn nf ihe centur) the statistical information was none Ion accurate, hut besl estimates are' lhat the burning of coal provided aboul 70 per cenl of the energy supply of ihe nation. The burning nf wood provided aboul 2n per cent. Tin- remaining til per cent nl lhe energy market was divided between nil. gas. eiml water power. By lhe end of World War I. oil and gas had grown In aboul 17) per cenl of lhe total. Today, thej suppl) close tn leii per cenl of lhe country's energy. Coal'- percentage ha- faded, eiml wood heis been almosl eliminated. Although we bene a larger population them in I'll!', and use much in,,,-,- energ) per capita, the country's coal tonnage has actuall) decreased. Nnw wc eire entering wheit is widel) heralded ;i- the An.mie Age. The release nf atomic energy i- probabl) the outstanding scientific achievemenl nl iln- century, though ils practical applications will come more slowly than many new-paper -Inries would indicate. RESEARCH RESPONSIBLE FOR PHENOMENAL SCIENTIFIC PROGRESS Whal is lhe cause nf ihe tremendous acceleration of scientific progress in the past thirty or fort) years, after mi many centuries of relatively static civilizations? The main fen tnr has I,,-,-" scientific research, carried mil nn an expanding scale, lie expansion has been particularly marked in the- eei-e of applied research bv industry. In llu- early lifetime of many of us. industr) al leasl in lhe United Slales did practically no research. True, there were some pi ers in this field before 1920. General Flee irie. Duront, Eastman, ami a few others had alread) organized outstanding laboratories, which were largely responsible fnr making these companies so prominent. Bul FAi i - FORI \| NEWS, Sovember. mir, |* I ■
File Name uhlib_1352973_v004_n010_017.jpg