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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
File 060
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 060. 1955-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/479.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 060. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/479

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 060, 1955-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/479.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 8, September 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 060
Transcript Where ■5 Nil are Ihe by Henry Broderick llii- eirliclc l»> Mr. Ilrodcrick, a distinguished citizen of Seattle, first appeared in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Page 58 School (hildren of the early part of this century were stirred by the lines of Sir Walter Scott— "Breathes there a man with soul so dead Who never to himseli hath said— 'This is my own, my native land.' " If there were a modern version, il would read something like this— "Breathes there a man so old-fashioned That he takes his patriotism unrationed?" Much as it might appear, this critical essay is nol directed against teachers. professors', the intelligentsia, parents, or what-nots. Rather it is an indictment of a generation. In short, it is a plain diagnosis of what has happened to the Vmerican flag since World War I. To be sure, the "grand old flag" of song and storied fame is exhibited on state occasions, in parades, and celebrations where military units arc participants and on flagstaffs on specified elates. Hats are doffed when the flag passes in review, and momentarily one may get the impression that reverence for the national emblem is in full bloom. The fact is, the red-whitc-and-hlue en- sign is generally shown in a compulsive nt directive -ense, and the deference offered is generally automatic or superficial—not spontaneous. Time weis when the sight of lhe flag evoked tense inner passions in lhe heart, yes. even sentimental tears. 'The emblem stood for all that llu- 1 nited Slates meant at home and abroad. Nearly every home owned one or more flags and displayed them on big and little occasions. Every foreign nalipn had a conscious and abiding respect for it, because the) knew it was backed by the determination of Americans not to permit it to be slighted or trampled upon. But during the 20th century certain processes and procedures have churned lln-mselves into the thinking of our people. Thc one- world chimera has appealed to many of the upper strata of our intellectuals, who have in turn sifted down to the lower levels the doctrine that stress on nation alism is out of harmony with lhe oncoming trend of globular attitudes. In many schools emd colleges, Vmerican history is no longer taught, so that the youngsters have not the faintest notion or knowledge of wheel the flag stands for. On the contrary, they are taught that all national flags are to be considered collectively and thai sentimental leanings toward emv particular flag is contrary to modern realism. So in the minds oF many, the old Flag with its original motto, "Don't tread on me, is now just one of a family of flags and almosl forgotten in ihe hurrying mass effort toward comforts and conveniences. The emphasis is on leisure, not on liberty. Millions of Americans have succumbed to the new philosophies eiml have lost tlu-ir patriotic souls, bul we eem slill have failh in the other millions nl \inciiian- who courageously cling In the idea that our Flag is a living symbol of the free world and that it represents the only instrument left to enforce the maintenance of the Freedoms. 'Theii spirits arc saturated with the words of lhe poet : "Up to the breeze in the morning, I llinx >""■ Blending yout folds with the dawn in the sky- There let the people behold you, and bring you Love and devotion that never shall tlie Proudly, agaze at your glory, 1 slntnl Flag n' my land! Flag n my land!" FACTS FORUM NEWS, September, 1955 I
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