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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 058. 1955-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/477.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 058. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/477

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 058, 1955-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/477.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 8, September 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 058
Transcript ■m 5:e tion from annual appropriation control by Congress. The proposal would abolish the policy established in 1916—thirty-nine years ago—requiring slales to match federal funds for roads. The scheme was predicated upon pledging federally imposed gasoline taxes over a period of thirty years for the repayment of thc bonds and the interest. The Comptroller General of the United States, Mr. Joseph Campbell, recentl) appointed b) Presidenl Eisenhower, said of this proposal: "We (The General Accounting Office) feel that the proposed method of financing is objectionable because . . . the borrowing woulel nol be included in the public debt obligations of the I nileel States. ... It is our opinion that the government should not enter into financial arrangements which might have the effect of obscuring financial facts of the government's debl position. Comptroller General Campbell also questioned the legality of the proposal. We all wanl good roeuls. The people ire- willing to pa) for good roads, but il i- certainl) nol necessar) practically to destro) the fiscal bookkeeping of our country in order to finance <>ur roeul system. These bonds would, ol course, be .1 general obligation of the government. There is no banker in this country who would bin bonds of such a eluinnn federal corporation without the guarantee of the federal government. Should the gasoline t;t\ be dedicated thirty years in advance for the payment of bomb issue-el to build roads, then, by the same line of reasoning, other taxes could be dedicated for other specific purposes. II this were carried far enough there woulel be no funds for the more unglamoroiis but essentia] function-. PROPOSED AID FOR SCHOOLS The second of the three administration state-aid proposals involved about $8 billion in direct appropriations and contingent liabilities for payments, grants, loans and guarantees to states fnr school construction. The last bastion ol -tales rights and individual libert) lies in the education of our children. Federal appropriations t" public -chools followeel b\ the inevitable federal control will -Irikc a falal blow eil the grass roots of our del :racy. I do mil believe that there i- ei -t.it. or locality in the Union thai cannol provide lor lhe cost of its public school system if there is the' will to iln bo. FEDERAL HEALTH PROGRAM It is impossible to estimate the cosl of the President's third proposal, ll was for a so-called federal health payment program. If would be certain to cosl millions of dollars annually and it could easily be the beginning of socialized medicine. NO SUCH THING AS A FEDERAL GRANT ll is well for everyone to understand that there is no such thing as a federal grant. All of the money comes from citizens in lhe stales. The money goes In W ashington and there it is subject to de- ductions for federal administration. This money then geies back te> the states less deductions, and the federal government tells us how to spend our own money. Proposals have been advocated changing our budgetary system. The Secretary of the Treasury has not approved these proposals and I am certain he will not. But there are two budgetary proposals which recur with persistency, and I want lo warn you of them. First, there is the proposal for a 'cash budget. Those who advocate the "cash" budget are suggesting that the government pay its routine bills with savings of the citizens who have entrusted protection of their old age and unemployment to tin- guardianship of the federal government. 'These trust Funds were established from premiums paid by participants in Social Security, unemployment insurance, bank deposit insurance programs, etc. \"t ei cent of these funds belongs I" the government. Second, some are advocating a "capital" budget which means that so-called "capital" expenditures should not be considered as current expenditures in the budget. Those who advocate the so-called "capital" budget must start out wilh the fallacious assumption that llu- governmenl is in business In make a profit on its citizens. To my knowledge the federal gov- ernment has never made a bona fide profit on any government operation. Tlie\ must iissiiine thai debt contracted b) a fe'.leral agency i- nol a debt of the federal government and a burden on eill of the taxpayers. I am an old-lashioned person who be- lievi's lhal a debl is a debt just a- much in thc alomie age a- il was in lhe- horse an.l bugg) elen-. \ "capital budget must as-time theit government manufacturing plants, such as atomic energy installations, arc in commercial production for a profit, eiml that government stockpiles are long-time investments tor profit instead of precau- thins against emergencies when they would hi' completely expendable with no financial return. Likewise, il inii-t assume that the agriculture surplus program is primarily I lung range investment deed instead of a prop for annual farm income lei be- used when needed on a year-by-year basis. While lhe veislness and complexity of ih.- Federal governmenl nf ihe I nited Males necessarily makes budgeting difficult, the so-called "conventional budget currently in use offers the best approach to orderly financing with fullest disclosure. What is needed for a better fiscal system is fuller disclosure of federal ex- penditures eunl responsibility for them not less, as inevitably would be the case with so-called "cash" and "capital budgets. With full disclosure of the federal expenditure situation, the American people then would have an opportunity to decide whether they wanted to recapture e-eentrol and bring the rate of spending into balance with the rate of taxing anil thus reduce the tremendous federal debt burden we are now hearing. To capture control we must firsl re eluee unexpended balances in appropriations already made and rescind those which are nonessential. When we steirteel this Fiscal year, unexpended balances in appropriations alread) made totaled aboul $100 billion, including $78 billion in appropriations enacted in prior years, eunl $20 billion in authority lo spend directly out of the public debt. The situation is made even worse b) the procedure under which Congress acts on appropriation bills. Not only has Con- gre-ss lee-i eonlrol eever the- annual rate of expenditure, but once lhe President's budgel is submitted in January, Congress- never again sees it is a whole unit after llie- appropriations arc enacted. The firsl thing Congress does is to split the appropriation requests of the President into a dozen or more bills. Then il proceeds lo consider them separately over a period eif six months or more. In lhe consideration of these bills attention is given onl) to appropriations, and these may he -pent over a period of years. An appropriation enacted in a year when revenue is high may actually be spent in a year when revenue is low. 'There is never an opportunity in Congress, in action on appropriation bills, io consider them i" terms of annual expenditures in view of estimated revenue. To correct such an intolerable situs lion, along with 48 other Senators. I have introduced Legislation providing for il -ingle appropriation bill which would set forth mil onl) requested appropriations for the fulure but also unexpended balances available in prim appropriations. This resolution has three linn- passed the Senate but has not yel been acted on b\ the House. It provides further thai Congress writ* into the consolidated appropriation bill limitations on expenditures in the ensuing year from each appropriation. An'' beyond this it provides theit in determining the expenditure Limitations, all proper consideration should be given thc an ticipated revenue, the cash position of Page ">n FACTS FORUM NEWS, September, 1955
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