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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 054. 1955-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 17, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/473.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 054. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/473

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 054, 1955-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 17, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/473.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 8, September 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 054
Transcript 7—1 Book Reviews lEJumJc) (Continued from Page 51) to live and work for the 'common good.' They punish selfishness as a crime. The people try to live by force forced labor and forced sharing. The resull is frustration and conflict, hunger and death. "When these I nited States, alone in the world and first in history, stooel for individual freedom rather than big government, fnr private investment and free charities rather than taxed-forced 'foreign aid.' for trade rather than a world police force, they showed the world how man mav escape from famine, pestilence and war. The result was a century of life-saving such eis few dreamers ever hoped for. . . . "America gave most by showing how all people everywhere could escape from hunger and poverty bv establishing freedom for themselves. "Now eis the United Slates returns to the Old World policies of the Welfare State, they help to lead mankind back into the stagnant barbarism of coercive collectivism, and this betrayal of the American principle of freedom condemns to death more children than I'NICEF could feed if it took all the wealth of every American for the purpose. "Moral law applies fee government's conduct as to the conduct of private persons. The legal violence of government has precisely the same effects as violence by private persons. The Good Samaritan who raises a club against the indifferent passerbv himself becomes an enemy of mankind whether he holds a government job or nol. That is met the road to peace." The I nited Nations Road to War is just the sort of book which has long been needed to get the debate over the UN down lo fundamental concepts. Dr. Wall- bases his arguments directly nn the premise of individual freedom and limited government, -bowing how the I nited Nations ideal and practice violate thi- premise. This is a book well worth studying, and we are going hi hear more of it. Recognizing its fundamental value. The Devin-Adair Company plans In bring out a cloth-bound edition this fall. Readers will find much worth pondering, while our more- doc- trinaire internationalists may be encouraged in sharpen their wits as well as their tongues. G. W. DeArmond, Jr. Page a2 Treaties Versus the Constitution By Roger Lea MacBride. The Caxton Printers. Ltd., Caldwell, Idaho. 1955, 89 pp., SI.00. Story of the "Bricker" Amendment By Frank E. Holman. Committee for Constitutional Government. Inc.. 205 East 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y.. 1954, 179 pp., $1.00. Unquestionably the debate over tin- proposed Bricker Amendment involves one of the great constitutional issues of our history. It is a debate which will continue until such time as an adequate constitutional amendment assures that domestic "treaty law" shall be subject to the same constitutional limitations as legislation by the Congress. Or else until the Constitution, itself, is an anachronism, demolished in the machinery of international bureaucracy. More and more close races for congressional seats are- likely to hinge on this issue, but these political fortunes are relatively unimportant. It is not surprising that the great debate has brought forth books which represent searching studies of the threat unrestrained treaty power offers to the Constitution and to the concept of limited government. Two such books are Treaties Versus the Constitution and Story of the "Bricker" Amendment. Both are paper-bound and reasonably priced. Both should be read and studied by every American citizen. Every year we have many political issues. Some command an important niche in history yet to be written, while some are of the most transitory nature. But in the whole fabric of American government the Constitution is the central feature. It is the charter wherein free men delegate certain well-defined, limited powers to those whom they elect to conduct their affairs of government. The Constitution is the enunciation and implementation of the right of self-government. It is not a charter guaranteeing the right to rule. Our Constitution was not designed to perpetuate the European concept of unlimited government. Bather, it was designed to repudiate and guard against this very thing. A fundamental constitutional issue is one which goes to the very heart of our federal Republic. The issue pointed up by the Bricker Amendment is one of these which now assumes transcendent importance. It is not merely technical; il bears directly upon the form of gov ernment future generations of Americans shall have. This issue is not going to be disposed of by such sneering newspaper commentary as, "Senator Bricker took nearly two months emphasizing his distrust of the President's constitutional foreign policy powers." The issue is not whether the Presidenl can or cannot negotiate treaties in the fiolel of foreign affairs that has not been questioned. Rather, il is an issue whether he can, with or with out the concurrence of the Senate, make and then enforce domestic law governing thc citizens of the United States, without regard for constitutional limitations. Our same columnist on another occasion referred lo the ''President's constitutional authority, to make executive agreements," and went on to say that an amendment should not "restrict the areas in which treaties can be nego tiated." This would seem to be ei rather bald approval of unlimited executive power, to say nothing of its being somewhat cavalier in ils regard for the actual provisions and language of the Constitution. If this is indicative of the type of "constitutional" commentary we are to reael in the press, we will do very well. indeed, to study more extensive writings on the subject. TREATIES VERSUS THE CONSTITUTION Roger Lea Men-Bride, in his final \ceii at Harvard Law School, made an extensive study of the question of amending the Constitution to prevent abuse of the Irealy power. The bulk of Treaties Versus the Constitution weis submitted as his thesis. In addition lo being published by Caxton. Mi. Mae-Bride's study has been brought out in a special edition by the Constitution and Free Enterprise Foundation. Inc. in a first printing of 100 thousand copies. Thus, ihis is a book which will be widely read and much i" demand, and most properly so; it is an excellenl ami highly informative study nf the- history and implications of treaty law. Frank Holman, himself lhe author of one book and many pamphlets and articles on lhe subjeel. has said. "I have no hesitation in saying that it is one of the best exposes of the danger of treaty law in \iii.ricein rights emd tin- American form of governmenl thai has yel been written.' Senator Bricker has said, "Mr. Mac- Bride's book should be read bv everyone who wishes to have a full understanding of the momentous constitutional issues involved in this historic debate for a treaty-control amendment." Thus we have a book giving the case for a consti tutional amendment, highly praised by two of the iiii-n who have mosl activel) worked for such an amendmenl. Mr. MacBride has searched the records of judicial cases involving treaty issues. He has presented a great deed of useful information in a compact, readable form. Adequate footnotes are available for those who wish to delve deeper Some interesting points are brought out which expose as trivial or deliberately deceptive various argument- n-rn in opposition to a constitutional amendment. One argument is that which holds thai FACTS FORUM NEWS, September, 1955
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