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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 046. 1955-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/465.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 046. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/465

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 046, 1955-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/465.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 8, September 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 046
Transcript thoughtful and well-balanced; and I feel quite sure that his position was shared by a good many others. For a second illustration, 1 turn to an experience in 1951, when Dr. W illiam S. \ incent and I tried to describe the Citizenship Education Project to delegates from some twenty-five teachers associations from all six continents gathered at the meeting of the World Organization of the Teaching Profession at \ aletta on the Island of Malta. There appeared to be sympathetic interest in lln- theor) behind the projeel; approval of man) of the materials: ami evident intention to experiment with the ideas in a prclimi- neirv wav. But our description of children and community members participating in labor-management conferences eunl taking part in a local election in Pearl River, New York, of interviewing candidates, poll watching, radio programs in lire enxv ille, New York; of meeting with the Citv Council in Elizabeth, New Jersey, brought immediate criticism. We were tohl that SUCH activities woulel be prohibited in foreign schools. Europeans ,1" nol understand the newly adopted American policies regarding the schools eunl communism. They are ijuite out of sympath) with our point of view. They believe that vve are making major mistakes, violating academic freedom and infringing on the righl ol freedom of speech. Their ideas and ours are verv far apart. Allow a- much as vou like for great social, political and geographical differences, I do not believe thai we can both be righl. Either the) eire wrong, ,,r we- eire wrong, or we are both parti) wrong. That is whv we should gel to the bottom ,,f the differences. How then do the Europeans view communism? How the Americans? Whal are the basic reasons L.r each posi- tion? How valid are these reasons'.' I hi- is the logical process we must follow if we eire to juslifv one poliev or lhe' oilier, "i recommend a modification of one ,,r lhe other. Now ii i- obvious thai it i- impossible to give- ei completel) accurate picture ol bow Americans ,,r Europeans look on anv subject Individual people do not hold a single view even within a family, let alone a communit) or a nation. The mosl carefully conducted polls of pub lie opinion eire not lullv accurate. W ben we- ti v to make a big generalization eis t,, bow Vmericans or Europeans look upon communism, il is impossible to draw upon scientific studies. There are no polls, censuses, or objective' researches to consult. Nevertheless it is proposed here in give one person's idea of how he thinks man) Europeans and Americans look upon communism and its educational implications, and why they take ibis poinl of view. Obviousl) it i- not intended to include the poinl of view of everyone naturally in Eu rope ami America there eire persons of all shades of opinion—but what we' seek is what many Americans or Europeans believe': eunl what on the whole is the preponderance ol opinion. He who makes this judgment cannot protect his readers or listeners from his prejudices or errors. However, he speaks from a fairly wide acquaintance. Willi all the limitations jusl staled in mind, the European view of communism can be described in the following three assumptions: t I I Thai communism is merel) a political movement. i2i That communism ,lo,-s nol threaten the liberty of the free peoples. and ils inroads eue greatly exaggerated eunl has)-,I upon iinlriisl w ,,i ihv evidence. ,:!i I hat communism has little appeal for the niass ,,f tIn- people. ASSUMPTION 1: THAT COMMUNISM IS MERELY POLITICS In Britain and in mosl of the countries of Free Europe, there is an officially recognized Communist partv. which an- iiduiiii- partv policies, nominal)- candidates for office, lakes pari in elections; and in some cases shares in ei coalition government. Teachers mav join the Com- munisl partv i in some countries in suh- stantial numbers) and not infrequent!) the) have' considerable power in teachers' organizations. The Communisl partv is tieeiie-el just like any other political parlv. The principle "No Polities in the School" is so generall] accepted eunl go h iilelv followed in Europe thai it mav be taken a- universal. Schools should present tin- facts, produce the results of ac- cepted scholarships eunl research, con- -ieler and discuss various theories, philo- -Mpi'e.'s i,,,, -.ae'li-a's objective]) : but when il (amies |o "polities" thev lllllsl lake no sides. During thc first talk I made before the Delegate Vssembl) <,! ihe National I nion of Teachers of Eng- I.unl eenel Weil,--. | started to tell a slorv thai made the audience ihink thai I was going to refer to communism, and a she.lll Weill Up. "No pe,lilies!" W lllll ill \ ii',1 to lei tun- eit ei great European university, il wei- p,,Iilelv suggested lhat I ,iiseii-s "pure pedagogy. ' W hen we- came t,, consider the drafl constitution for a new anel more inclusive World Organization ,,l Teachers, we' devoted a whole eleiv ■■! a ihri'i'-eletv meeting lo the first clause, thai all epiestieins of partisan politics and sectarian religion should be excluded, European teachers In, 1,1 to this principle ,,l political ni'iilreililv with great tenacity. We can understand their concern in those' countries where there is a munii ipeililv eel political parlies, often representing fractional interest, ethnic groups, farmers or workers, religious sects. Education musl have continuity, ll must n,,t change vvilh the rise le. power <,l each political partv. Hence, it musl be neutral. I nder this principle, European schools exclude attacks against communism in the schools, permit Communists to teach. admit them t" their associations, and treat them as if thev wen' members ol emv oilier political peirlv. Anv other course would seem t<, them i" be dangerous in the extreme. ASSUMPTION 2: THAT COMMUNISM IS NOT A THREAT \lan\ teen hers anil other intellectuals. bulb in Britain ami on the Continent, do nol accept the idea thai the 1 .S.S.R. is aggressive-: that there is anv danger of their attacking Europe; lhal they will be -o fooli.-b eis to bring on a third World War. They explain the presenl apparent attitude of Riissiei b) lhe fail theit the Capitalist countries have never been Friendly; in lent, invaded Russia after W orhl Weir I. ami have- remained hostile ever sini','. \|| (be free- people' I el lee ilo is lo hold oul the friendl) ham! Furthermore, man) believe that the Communisls in the free countries arc nol real Communisls al all, "nol like Russian Communists." I have heard such statements repeatedly. In one town in the Pyrenees I ask,-,I a friend why a certain man was a Communist. The answer weis: "(lb! lb' isii t ei real Communisl at all. lie is onl) going along wilh his ,,|(| comrades who fought together in the marquis during lhe war. ' \sking aboul another man. he replied. "He is not et real Communisl al all. lb' jusl voles lhal weiv because hi' eleeesn'l like lhe local priest." I have heard references Beveral limes ti) em eillege'il sleitcmetil of some Scotch divine thai he would rather live under Stalin than under lhe Pope-. I In- Europeans el,, not seem to know verv miu h about thi' revelation of Doug- la- Hyde, W billaker Chambers or Eliza- betb Bentle) : anil those who know about them, refuse lo believe them. Whal European comment I have heard on the Hiss case or lhe trial of lhe eleven Communis! leaders makes me think thai thev consider them miscarriages of justice and intimidation of llu- courts bv mass hvsleria. W ben you bring up lhe case of Fuchs, the) shrug their shoulders. Whal eliel these traitors give eiwav thai intelligent people would not have' found mil anv wav ? ASSUMPTION 3: THAT COMMUNISM HAS NO APPEAL TO THE MASS OF PEOPLE Whatever threat communism may beivi-. European teachers seem to minimize because, thev believe lhat il has no appeal to "people like von and me. The Communists arc smaller in number, eunl tbe.sr who join arc the "seedy," the "envious,' the "balers." those who would be againsl everything anyway, even if Marx. Lenin and Stalin had never e'\is|eal. II is hard for them to think that Doug- Page 44 FACTS FORUM NEWS, September, 1955
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