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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 045. 1955-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/464.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 045. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/464

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 045, 1955-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/464.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 8, September 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 045
Transcript COMMUNISM and EDUCATION American vs. European Policies by William F. Russell Deputy Director, Technical Services International Cooperation Administration, Past President, Teachers College, Columbia University. Speech delivered at Convention of the California Association „< School Administrators H' MAT lo do aboul Communists and communism. That is the latest hard problem confronting the school superintendent anel lhe college presidenl. ll cannot be Ignored or dodged, li cannot be laid upon the table. Inept handling may alienate public support. Fumbling may ruin a good organization. Requisite to successful administration is the adoption of ei wise and resolute policy and the will to carry it into effect. Whal should ibis policy be? Many people have many ideas both here eunl abroad. Nevertheless America sei'ius to be' settling upon one poliev. Europe quite another, with the resull thai of all the variations which one can detect in lhe educational work over here .in,l over there, none is now so completely misunderstood, nunc so productive of suspicion and ill will, as the contrail in the ways in which schools and teachers are reading to the threats of communism. This discussion proposes t" describe these contrasting policies and practices in European and American1 schools. give- lhe lease.ns for lhe differences; and then to draw whatever lessons we can ind for the American school administrator eiml college president. THE AMERICAN VIEW The I nited States is coming to the decision that the schools should take ee firm stand against communism. Communisl teachers arc beginning to be barred, as evidenced bv such measures as the Feinberg Law in New York, the scti I the National Education Association in 1949 followed bv similar action this summer bv the American Federation of Teachers, various types "I oaths for teachers, ami the undoubted public approval which heis greeted the dismissal of Communists b) such educational executives as the Superintendent Of Sel I- of New ,- oil Cilv em,I the President of the I niversit) oi \\ ashing- now al I CLA, Positively, there is nnw developing -''-.it enthusiasm for a number "I cilu- 1 America eunl American are intended to ""'ein .mu the U.S.A. Europe and European ""I i ontinental are Intended to mean nnest eel Western Europe, excepl Ireland, >|ieeh> and n 'lia „ 11,-1. exceptional conditions prev ail. cational programs designed lo strengthen American ideals, arouse patriotism, and to improve the actions of American citizens. Partly because they have little enthusiasm for negative measures (you can't root out all the Communists Communists will be the first to take the oath) teachers have welcomed programs in citizenship education. They believe that the best way to beat lhe Communisl is te) faee him with citizens who know and love their country, who both understand and revere its ideals, who i an recognize them and apply them in the ordinary situations of everyday life. The Citizenship Education Project — one of these many programs has been enthusiastically received, widely adopted, and is spreading more rapidly than we had thought possible. American schools are coming to take a far more active role than formerly in developing American citizenship, and in conse- ipicne'c. in combating la.mmunisin. It is the American people who have made this decision. Some educational policies are determined in the classroom by the individual teacher, sonic by the .superintendent of schools, or by the supervisory or administrative .-.lafT. But this decision regarding communism comes from the people, eis they express their will in state eiml local legislative' bodies or school hoards- in national, steete- hi local voluntary associations sometimes called pressure groups and bv parents and teachers close to indi- viebieil schools. The American people are coming to the decision that the Bchools shall stand againsl communism; thai Communisl teachers and Communisl teaching and propaganda will not be tolerated: thai greater efforl musl be made to strengthen patriotism and improve the' sense of elulv and w illingncss to serve' eif the fulure citizen; all ibis to lhe end thai American education mav play ils proper role- in the great efforl thai tree people' .if the world are making to maintain their freedom. THE EUROPEAN VIEW \e le.ss the Atlantic, teachers in general ami thoughtful pcplc associated with teachers view these' American decisions with great alarm, believe them to be basie- mistakes, ami cannol under stand w 11v teachers and professors have nol risen up in arms againsl them. Here arc two illustrations, both personal. In 1952 I was invited to give- one of the Jubilee Lectures of the I niversit) of London Institute of Education. This paper entitled "The Caravan Goes On" I tried out first before a general session of the AASA. It was an effort to explain certain recent developments in American education and to isolate eunl analyze lhe considerations that led lo recent cril- icisms of our schools. To lay the foun- ilaliieii for an understanding of present American concerns for education, I discussed our reluctant realization thai we were no longer isolated, the < ommunisl threat, the disappearance of ei -ense' of eeisv optimism and confidence, the re- binb ol the psychology of the pioneer I including children wearing the coon- skin cap), and the growing puhlie- concern at the quality of American ,-iiizen- ship eis evidenced bv the Miss case, the tiieil of the eleven Communisl leaders under Judge Medina and other recent revelations ,,f Communisl intrigue and infiltration. Reading the same paper before the I l-tii Teachers Union, where there was ample lime pie.vide,I lor discussion. I at <■ realized that I had struck upon a highlv controversial topic, despite the efforl I bad made to emphasize that I wee- speaking wholly of American conditions. Whv were lhe Americans s,, frightened? Whv we're tbcv Irving to disturb the peace of the world? Communists were merelv members of ei minority political party. Why think them aggressive? In facl. is ii not precisel) the Communisl who advocates peace? Who talks of war? Only the Americans. The Russiein- will never attack Europe. \ „u Americans, with vour Feinberg Law. McCarthy-ism and Hiss witchhunts, you are merely hysterical, ll is ei mistake to allow politics in the schools. W hv are ve,u tr) ing to Eoisl vour mistakes on the resl of the world? Such ideas were expressed bv onl) a few e,l tb<< large eiml friendl) audience al the meeting In 1 l-tir; but the member who led this critical discussion was an able man. an experienced eiml competent school administrator, obviously PACTS FORUM NEWS. September, 1955 Page 4.1
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