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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
File 043
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 043. 1955-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/462.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 043. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/462

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 043, 1955-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/462.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 8, September 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 043
Transcript Wenii'ii Austin, al thai time Presidenl oi the Security Council, declared: "...I shoulel like- lei eisk whither any membei wishes to express einv further views in the Council on the question of the liming of the consideration of the reporl of the I nited Nations (511111103 sion for Indonesia of II October on the Ambon affair, "Speaking as representative ol the I nited States of America, I am instructed be state that my governmenl Ihink- that Ihis subjeel should be dis- cussed by the Security Council at an earlv date." (Security Council official records, 517th Meeting, No. 59.) I ntil the momenl that the 1 N shall translate these words into deeds, the South Moluccans (Amboinese) shall continue to fight the Indonesian ageii- sors. Until such time, there shall be no peace or tranquillity in this strategic area. People shall continue to suffer and die, or wait in foreign exile. The Forgotten War of the South Moluccas i> as remote as ii is significant, ll puis a vital question lo the test: Is tin- I N ('Innter based on power or on justice? THE INDONESIAN REVOLUTION Tin' Sunt li Moluccan question stems bom lhe Dulih-Indonesian conflicl of postwar elavs. Tin' peoples of Indonesia, including lhe South Moluccans. won their independence from Holland in 1919 when the Netherlands transferred their 350-year-old sovereignty to a federation of Indonesian states, the llcpiiblik Indonesia Serikal. or the Republic of the United Slales of Indonesia. The capital of the federation became Jakarta, formerly Batavia. The federative form of statehood was agreed upon between Dutch and Indonesians at the Round Table Conference of The Hague. Representatives oj the United Nations attended and co-signed the resultant pact. In the new, free Indonesian federation, the South Moluccas territorial!) belonged to the component state of Fast Indonesia. In the charter of sovereignty- ''eiiisfi , it wei- expressly stipulated lhat 'In- various and diverse peoples inhabit 'ng the Indies Archipelago hail the right oj self-determination, in accordance with the principles of lhe 1 nileil Vlliem-. Then, in disregard of the Round 'able Pact, one of lhe federation's com ponenl states—the Java-based Republic {)■ Indonesia — started a unilateral liquidation of the Federation. With use °« armed force, which they alone pos- 8e8sed, the Jakarta government proeecil- '''I to systematical!) dissolve all other "-urnponent territories. The object weis tee feplace the Federation by a unitary "'ale. which amounted to illegal domi- "ation of all Indonesia by the Javanese Cornponcni state, the Republic of Indoles! a. FACTS FORUM NEWS, September, 1955 I liis ambition has heen resisted to ibis day hv the freedom-loving Moluccans, who refuse to let their newly-won independence degenerate into ei mere change of masters, The Moluccans, who are Melanesians, differ basically from the rest of Indonesia, both racially and historically. \\ Inn President Sukarno started to liquidate the component state' eil Easl Indonesia, which included the South Moluccas, the population of these islands resorted to their rii^hi oj self- determination, which heul been expressly granted them by the Round Table- Ten t in which the I \ is co-signatory. The East Indonesian state governmenl on Celebes was forcibly overthrown by the Javanese in the spring eif 1050. shortly after the transfer of sovereignty. Seeing the writing on the wall, the South Moluccan people, through their legal anil freel) elected representatives, hacked lev giant demonstrations of unanimous resolve, seceded from the crumbling federation on April 25, 1950, and pro- eleiiini-el tlie independent Re-public of the South Moluccas free from both llulch and Indonesian control. The Indonesian government, with the assistance of Dutch transports, senl troops to the South Moluccan islands, eiml the new republic began ils bitter fight for survival. The Indonesians with their twenty- fold superior power predicted quick success, an operation "lasting nol more than four days." A full week went by before the firsl beachhead could be established. Tanks and heavy artiller) we're landed, but in spite' of these and sustained sea and air support, il required six weeks of hitler and continuous fighl- ing before the Indonesians acquired a secure foothold on the Amboinese coast. Ai presenl certain areas of Amboina, liiiru eiml olbii isleinels arc held by the Indonesian forces eenel suffer the rigors ol a inilit.iiv occupation. I> 111 elsewhere ei military stalemate has ensued, with large areas under effective control of the South Moluccan government, based on the main island of Ceram. In an effort to bleak ibis stalemate the Indonesian government heis resorted to a total blockade, which has now bean in effeel since June, 1950, bringing with il the inevitable suffering and near- s|,n e.iiion feer the- civ il population. UNITED NATIONS REBUFFED lln- Dutch government, as co-signer of the violated Round l.ible Pact, was obligated to take the issue' to the I nited Nations Commission for Indonesia. This commission had played an important part in the Indonesian struggle for independence, I he Round fable (lonfer- 1 in3. which led to the birth of lhe Indonesian federation, was held under the auspices of ihis commission, ll had the task ol supervising the implementation of the independence eis stipulated in the agreements signed eil the above conference. In pursuance ol its responsibilities the I nited "\eilions Commission for Indonesia 11 NCI) requested permission ol the Indonesian governmenl to visit the Ninth Moluccan battle area. This tins rejused. I In1 Indonesian governmenl expressed as ii- opinion thai anv violation of llu' Ileiunel Table Pacl constituted merel) an "internal affair." The 1 NCI look lhe' nexl logical slop and on October II. 1050. reported the developments to its sponsor, the Security Council of the I nited Nalions. To this ilai the Security Council has jailed to act mi the report oj its Indonesian Commission. lhe fifteen thousand Amboinese now in Dutch HI' camps constitute a tragic SCENES IN AMBOINA before the Indonesian invasion—top left, Laha Airfield: top right, South Moluccan flag flying proudly. Lower left, dock at Amboina. After invasion, the South Moluccan government moved to the island of Ceram, north of Amboina, where it still functions; lower right, Amboina's natural naval base, strategically located. Page 41
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