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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 038. 1955-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/457.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 038. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/457

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 038, 1955-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/457.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 8, September 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 038
Transcript >te lion both at home and abroad on as large a scale as conditions would permit. \- I indicated earlier, in the case of wheat alone, export subsidies have been averaging eighty cents per bushel — 8200 million a year. I nder the broadened authority vested in us through Public Law 480, we have' signed agreements with eleven nations for the sale of $226 million worth of surplus farm commodities for foreign currencies. Nearly one-third of this total represents wheat, with 33 million bushels scheduled for export under this agreement. A large part of the 17 million bushels of the wheat shipped thus far under this program is hard winter wheat. .. . Our program for the fiscal ve-ar. covering shipments through September, 1955, should bring the total to between 50 and 60 million bushels of wheat and wheat Hour equivalent. Public Law 480 requires lhat these sales be in addition lo the usual marketings of the I nited States. We are taking every precaution to see that our normal exports are not being displaced. Title II of Public Law lllll authorizes lhe President to use surplus agricultural commodities in meeting famine and urgent relief needs in other areas of the world. Nearly 20 million bushels of wheat and wheat flour equivalent have- been used for this purpose. Public Law 180 alsei provides for expansion in the barter activities of the Department of /Agriculture. During the period July 1. 1951. through April 30. 1955, we traded 45 million bushels of wheat for metals and other strategic materials for defense purposes. About 33 million bushels of this wheat has alreaelv heen shipped. \t the same time, the Foreign Operations Administration is required to use not less than $350 million for the purchase of surplus agricultural commodities for use in its programs. This minimum has already been exceeded and I'OA has programmed over 50 million POLITICAL DEFINITIONS SOCIALISM—You have two cows and give one to your neighbor. FASCISM—You have two cows. The Government takes both and sells you the milk. NAZISM—You have two cows. The Government takes liolli and shoots you. NEW DEALISM—You have Iwo cows. The Government lakes both, shoots one, milks lhe other anel throws lln milk away. COMMUNISM—You have Iwo cows. The Government takes both, controls eeenl regiments your life so closely yon would rather be eleaeel. but gives you back jusl enough of the milk Io sustain your life, thus prolonging your agtmy while constantly telling you ami thc world how luck, you are. CAPITALISM—You have two cows. You sell one and buy a bull. bushels of wheat and wheat flour equivalent. These government programs, added to sales under the International Wheat \greement. will account for the export ot more than 220 million bushels of w heat. Despite all of these programs and even with tight production curbs, it has been impossible to prevent a continuing build-up in supplies of wheat and some other commodities. .Although the loan level has been at 00 percent ol parity, our calculations show that actually farmers received an average of 84 percent of pariiv [or wheal during the L952-53crop year, 1>0 percent during 1953-54 and ill percent thus far in 1954-55. In view of this experience of recent years, I am convinced thai we need to direct our farm program toward better balanced production. We need to encourage increased research and education, we need more marketing efficiency. We need In find new markets and expand existing ones. We must be com* petitive price-wise, quality-wise and pro- motion-wise. Fnr Ihe states which have been so heavily dependent upon wheat, we need #&M&&P*:S —Wide World Pholo To reduce wheat surpluses, Secretory of Agriculture Benson suggests an accelerated increase in the cattle Industry. Page 36 I., develop alternative and profitable crops. We need a plant which could bring to the wheat-producing area something approximating the new billion-dollar industry which the soybean created in the Corn lielt. Perhaps it should be an oilseed or a high-yielding forage crop e>r even an entirely new plant. Right now our research people tell me lhat hybrid grain sorghums show real promise for the hard winter wheat area, vvilh increased yields up to 50 percent. The remarkable population growth in the Inited Stales will call for much greater livestock production in the years ahead if we are to maintain present dietary standards. Possibly a continuing and accelerated increase in the cattle industry holds the brightest future for many farmers. Meanwhile, however, wheal will be llu' principal and perhaps the most profitable crop for many parts of the nation, lor those areas, the real opportunity lies In improved wheat varieties and in the' research eunl education which will provide them. For the current year, we increased funds available for wheat quality research bv $50,000. Other si/e-eibl,' increases have been earmarked for re- search devoted In stem rust. smut, mosaic diseases and insect control. \ll" gether. we have more than $700,000 available for wheat research work alone during lhe current fiscal year and a similar eun,unit for next year. This compare! with total wheat research expenditures of $272,000 as recently as 1947. . . . I have real confidence in the value <" research, education and market de've'lnp- inent. Mosl of the greal gains of agriculture have come from tlu-se' sources. I he- lii've they ,ilfer the surest approach I" many of our problems. Whatever the role of government i" ■ mr farm program of lhe future, it mil*' never overshadow personal freedom an" initiative. \lv own experience in Washington has onlv strengthened mv conviction thai fanners, through their individual and cooperative efforts, can do motf Im themselves than lhe governmenl caD ever do for them. Moreover, I believe farmers are loo realistic and loo self-re- liant ever to barter awav ihe fr Im" to make llieir own decisions. \s I look ahead, I cannot be anythinfS hut optimistic over the future of American agriculture. Certainly we have oui current problems. We have heul others "' the pasl and tomorrow mav well brffi new niics. Nevertheless, vceir in and yea' nut. American agriculture is nmvii'r ahead. It is more efficient and more p'"' .Im live than ever before in our history This real anil lasling progress will cof linue. May God give us the strength and th'j wisdom to work toward the constant go" of all who love the land — an expanding' prosperous and free agriculture. FACTS FORUM NEWS, September, 19&
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