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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 037. 1955-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 21, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/456.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 037. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/456

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 037, 1955-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 21, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/456.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 8, September 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 037
Transcript 1951, came aboul while we had supports eil 90 percenl of parity. Flexible price supports el" mil even become effective until 1955 crops move to market. Rigid price supports have been employed ;i- ;i sort "I political smokescreen to hide one indisputable facl the facl thai ii was not the on percenl floor belovi but rather price- ceilings at the top which controlled farm prices during eiml inime dialelv loll,,wing World War II. Inflation and the insatiable demands e,l war would have' carried farm prices I" much higher levels had there been neither price supports nor price' controls. \n<! I would remind Mr. Reuther's newly- Found farm Friends that he weis oi ihe' mosl energetic and vocal advocates of continued price- controls long after the emergenc) had passed. \- all of vmi know, there is nothing new in rev iiliili.ineirv about flexible price' supports. \\ c heul them for the basic com •nudities before World War II ranging between 52 and 75 percenl of parity .nul usually al lhe lower end of that scale. For example, wheal was supported at .">2 percenl of parity in 1938, 56 per cenl in 1939 and 57 percenl in 1940. Stranger) enough, some "I the verv people who will settle for no less than 'JO or even 100 percent of parit) price supports 'low were eirdenl defenders ol lhe' eehl program. Everyone agreed when supports al 00 percent were inaugurated during World War II that this was strictly em emer gem v program, to end when we returned i" more nearl) normal markets eunl conditions. The platforms ,,l both major parties in 19 Hi endorsed a return In flexible price supports as did the then Presidenl of the I nited States and his Secretarv of Agriculture. . . The Agricultural Acl "I 1948 provided for flexible price sup ports ranging between (>() and 90 per- 1''nl of parity for the basic commodities, with a minimum level of 72 percenl when average allotments or marketing quotas were in effect. I he' Following year, the principle "I "exibilit) llii- time between 75 and '" percenl "1 parit) wee- restated in Ae Agricultural Acl of 1949, the so- called Anderson Act. W ith the outbreak "t the Korean War the following year. t-ongress eigeiin postponed the effective ''"le For flexible price supports but left "'is ki\ provision for a Long-range Peacetime program in the law. Essential- K- the Agricultural Acl of 1954 cleared ""/ waj im the Acl of 1949 to become effective eis scheduled bul limited the '*wge of flexibility between 82]/2 and 90 Percenl of parit) for 1955, with the full "''\ibililv of the law in eepplv in subse- 'I'lent years. the measure recentl) approved bv the 'ouse would extend For another three Pears a program burn of wartime emer- —Wide World Photo Bound for overseas shipment, grain pours into the hold of a ship at New Orleans, La. Surplus grain from the midwestern plains is sent down the Mississippi River for shipment overseas to famine-threatened countries all over the world. lilical parties, eill of the farm organizations and, in fact, eilmost everybody, agreed should come to an end when the emergency was over. Further extension of this program now would represent a retreal from reality a definite backward step. Experience clearh demonstrates thai rigid price supports are self-defeating. Thev freeze agricultural production in unbalanced and uneconomic patterns. Thev discourage efficient utilization of Farm resources. And. finally, when the surpluses which itieviteiblv follow rigid supports make il uecessar) to appl) 'emir, ,1s. the Farmer who has been growing qualit) products For the market finds himself in the same' production strait- jackel as the man whn has been using the government loan program for ,■■ dumping ground. The long-term interests of agriculture demand ee safer, surer and more workable- approach to our problems. The rigid price support system has Failed lei Function effectively despite the unprecedented efforts and expenditures we have- directed toward making ii work. First, we undertook iln- greatest expansion of commercial and on-the-farni storage in history to make the loeui on wheal and other commodities available to nn,re Farmers than ever before. We recognized that the loan meant little to the fanner who eeuilil not obtain suitable storage space and that such space bail not always been provided in the past. Altogether, L59 million bushels of commercial warehouse capacity have been built iii tlie last two years under CCC's use-guarantee program. We pro- viiled 70 million bushels of space for wheat through use- of the muthball fleet of the Maritime Administration. During the last two years, CCC has added some 300 million bushels of bin storage capacity to ils facilities, bringing the total to 847 million bushels. We have underwritten construction of some 85 million bushels eel Farm storage space under the Facilit) loan pmgram. The 83rd Congress additionally provided a rapid lax write off mi I;tnn ste.rage' construction. We have made emergency loans nn wheat on ihe ground emd in temporary storage to insure that no farmer would be' excluded frnm lhe program. We have sought and obtained from Congress increases in CCC's borrowing authority lirsi from *(>•'', billion In ■So1 j billion, and then In $10 billion, as surpluses continued In pile up in governmenl ownership and under loan programs. W )■ have energetically innveel surplus accumulations into channels of consump- K'-llev .i program w hich lhe major pi -\V\de World Photc The U. S. provided 70 million bushels of space for surplus wheat through use of the moth- ball fleet of the Maritime Administration, part of which is shown above as it lies at anchoe- age in the James River at Norfolk, Va. 195° ACTS FORUM NEWS, September, 1955 Page .'!.")
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