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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 036. 1955-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/455.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 036. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/455

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 036, 1955-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/455.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 8, September 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 036
Transcript ■■ S! -Wide World Photos Miles of fields like the Oklahoma wheat- field (bottom) have contributed to piling surpluses like the one overflowing outside elevators at Withrow, Wash. (top). Such surpluses have raised serious questions about the farm program — whether more or less government aid is necessary. I1).) 1 crop mav be about the same. The break-down on this 1953 crop take-over is illuminating, ll shows that CM', acquired 57 percent of the white wheat produced in the Northwest 1" percent of the hard red winter wheal grown in Kansas and eight neighboring stale-. 34 percent "f the hard red spring wheat from the Northern Plains state? and 33 percent "I the soft reel winter wheat grown in the Midwest. In terms of bushels, the governmenl took title to 95 million bushels of white wheat. 204 million bushels nl hard win Ier. oil million bushels ..I hard -pring and ')n million bushels of -..It red »intei wheat. Hani red winter wheat accounted le.r aboul 13 percent ..I CC( ■'- total acquisitions during the' vear. There i- another set of figure's which sheds further light nn ihis subject. It i- ei compilation of the percentages "I various classes "I wheal u-eal For human consumption within the- I nited Neiio-. li shows thi- utilization over the five-year period, 1950-54. During this time', as an average, 30 percent ..I the white wheat went int.. domestic I I use, as did 39 percenl ol tin' heiril reel winter, oil percent of the' -oil red winter. 61 percent "I the hen.I red spring and 80 percent of the' durum crop. In other words, the percentage ol hard winter wheal going into domestic food consumption is below the national average "I 15 percenl .mil feer under the percentages for -..mi' other classes o wheat. It seems tu me that all of the figures I have just cited raise ;e basic question relating lo proposeils lor a two-price or multiple-price program for wheal. Various plans lor the implementation of such a program have' been pul forward ami widely-discussed over tin- past thirty years en- more. Such plans have heen introduced during the present session of 1 longress. I In- first premise is that this countr) should produce around one billion bushels eef wheal each year to utilize ils resources most effectively. Historical!) aboul half a billion bushels arc consumed leu I I domestically during each year. Neeteal in simplest terms, lhe plan is lo oive' the- Farmer ;i high fixed guar* antee, perhaps at Inn percenl of pen ii v. for lhe olid million bushels used for food within lhe I nited Steites. The- rest of the annual production would either be sup- ported ai a much lower rate or allowed le. seek its own price level as il mines into export channels and livestock feed outlets w it li i ii ihis country. Nnw Id ii- apply this formula lo a hy- potluiii.il e else'. Let us assume that Farmer Brown produces 2,000 bushels ..! Chiefkan wheat, almost none of which is likely to find its way into .l<>tnisli< I"...I consumption. His neighbor. Farmer Jones, produces em equal amount of line Comanche wheat, most of which will probablv move' into Inod use-. !)"'■- Farmer Brown get tin- same gnv- ernmenl payment for 1,000 bushels of inferior wheat ;is Farmer June's gets foi the same amounl nl high epieililv wheat'.' Does the- Dakota wheal farmer who hei- been producing lop quality hard spring wheat for tin- commercial trade gei the same treatment as bis cousin in another area who has been growing much of his wheal lor lhe governmenl loan? II the answer to llie--,' questions is yes eunl it is excepl Foi minor qualifications then lhe two-price eer multiple- price plan falls far short nl it- announced objective of fair compensation I" lhe fanner fur lhe portiun nl his wheal production which move's into domestic looel ii-i'. Instead ii would perpetuate lhe injustices of lhe "Id rigid price plan which treated all wheat as virtuall) the same' For iln- loan purposes. This concept un- questionabl) was a major contributing factor I., th.- -hill toward high-yielding, low qualit) wheats eunl lie' resultant 9ur- phis)-s which hang eis an albatross about the necks "l Vmerican wheat farmers ever) where. I nli'ss w.- redirect wheal production inward improved qualit) anel eel the' same time reduce the incentives which have encouraged wholesale expansion of wheal acreage outside "I the areas where ii i- in..si economicall) produced, wc have "iilv seen the beginning nf our problem. Ol course, we' could extend thi mail tn ruin, vv e could pave il with g I iiitentie.il-. Km ii would -lill lead straight to ruin. I he multiple-price plan for wheat involve1,- other questions too. Farmers who produce feed grains have raised serious objections to such a program. Wheat- exporting nations have expressed the fear lhat ei two-price plan would lead to dumping anil generally demoralized worhl markets. Now Iel us look briefly at another proposal which has been put forward as the salvation of wheal growers and, in fact. of all farmers. I refer, of course, to current efforts te) restore price supports at 90 percenl of parity for lhe basic c modifies. As you know, ei bill lo accomplish this peisscel ||1(. House of Representatives by a narrow margin, last spring. The required majority was obtained when a number of city Congressmen, who had veiled againsl an extension of fixed supports in August of 1954, donned overalls for the'day — at least figurative!; eenel were shepherded into the 90 percenl of parity fold by a new farm leader, Mr. Walter Reuther. Perhaps lhe poorest-kept secrel in \\ ashington today is that those congressmen who wen' joined by ihe labor leadership in ih.- farm bill fight were expected tei return the Favor when Mr- Reuthi'i's Forces moved to increase tin' minimum wage scale' to $1.25 per hour or more'. In emv event, it ought to be clear b) now thai the very program ol rigiel sup ports which contributed so greatly to our present problems will never solve' ihi'in. The entire drop in farm prices and leital farm income which has occurred since the Korean War peak e.l lihiueirv. -Wide World F>h°,c CIO President Walter Reuther, who teNs a Senate Labor Subcommittee that an >"' crease in the hourly minimum wage to $'•?,. is "morally right and economically sound, expected help on the wage bill from forl* leaders whose efforts to restore price sup' ports at ninety per cent of parity receive his support. Page 34 F VCTS FORUM NEWS, Septembi r, '■""'
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