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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 008. 1955-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 11, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/427.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 008. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/427

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 008, 1955-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 11, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/427.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 8, September 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript i with the West Indies thrown in as a sweetener). Another cheering revolt by Negro .Vmericans against Soviet dogma happened somewhat earlier. On the assumption that American Negroes were an exploited Colonial class, they were assigned not to Lenin University, but to the Institute for the Toilers of tbe Orient. The living conditions among the Orientals, the skimpy food, the bug-ridden barracks, were so far below the standard of the American Negroes, that they staged a strike, perhaps the only successful one in Soviet history, and were reassigned to the Lenin University. Some of the students who were sent to Lenin University for the short course after 1930 had only nominal experience in the Communist party. This relaxation of entrance requirements, it is assumed, was due to the coming of the depression and a Soviet belief that the time for revolution was near. It was largely these short term, depression-motivated Communists who later broke away and told lhe story of their revolutionary schooling. The writer interviewed one such former student, a man of Slavic origin, who now is a successful small businessman in Pittsburgh, and whose name is omitted for that reason. When sent to Moscow, he was 20 years old and had only a little secondary education. When interviewed he gave tbe impression of being not very interested in politics. Probably the party considered him worth the trip to Moscow because he belonged to a minority group and because he was a steelworker and thus inside a key industry. At any rate the period of quick and comparatively nonselective training at Lenin University seems to have ended in 1933 when this country recognized the Soviet I nion. Part of that deal was that l!us-ia would cease trying to subvert our government Of course the Soviets had not the slightest notion of keeping the agreement, but the occasion did cause them to tighten security, at least where American students were concerned, and the school was moved out of Moscow so that foreigners in the capital could no longer see it. The new site, housing the- entire Comintern, was some 20 miles southeast of Moscow deep in the fore-; on a side road off a main highway. Igo: Bogolepov, a former Soviet Foreign Of fice counsellor who escaped to the West, visited the place in early 1940. He describes it as surrounded by a high wooden fence enclosing an area of at least a square mile. The single gate was flanked by guard lowers, and the security check upon entering unusually strict. Al the rear of the compound were two large one-story buildings bousing Comintern offices and classrooms. The remainder of the area was taken up with a central parade ground, surrounded by two-storv barracks in diagonally slanted rows. Eu- docio Ravines, a Peruvian ex-Commu- nist. also describes a visit to this Comintern center in 1938 in his book The Yenan Way. Incidentally, Ravines was the recipient in 1934 of the type of special revolutionary training given to foreign Communist leaders considered too important and busy to go through one of the colleges. His teachers were Mao Tse-tung, Chu Teh and Li Li-san, top Chinese Communists, who were quartered in a dacha several miles outside Moscow where their presence could not be detected by Western diplomats or newsmen. The latter precaution was of the greatest assistance to Left Wingers in the United States and elsewhere who were still claiming as late as 1949 that the Chinese Communists had no connection whatever with the Soviet Union. These Chinese worthies coached Ravines for two weeks on how to set up a "popular front" movement, which he later succeeded in doing in Chile. There is evidence that Lenin University was in business up to the beginning of the war. John Lautner. an important U. S. Communist who left the party since the war, states that to his personal knowledge American students were sent to Moscow as late as 1937. This means that the three-year students would have staved into 1940. However, the school was definitely closed when the Soviet Union was invaded in 1941. Bogolepov tells of meeting several faculty members on a train to Tashkent in that year. Since Tashkent is the site of a political warfare college for Indians and others it seems possible that at least this outlying institution stayed open through the war, but this is conjecture. It is known, however, that many Comintern personnel were utilized during the war for training prisoners of war. Hein- rich von Einsiedel, a grandson of I>i~- marck and an ace German fighter pilot, bears witness to this. In his book, / Joined The Russians, he tells of the "Na tional Committee for Free Germany and League of German Officers" which he joined after being shot down at Stalingrad. The supposed leaders of this not very successful committee were high- ranking German generals, but it was actually organized and run by German Comintern leaders Wilhelm Pieck, Walter Ulbrecht and Otto Braun. Since Hungarians, Rumanians, Italians, Spaniards, and Finns also fought on the eastern front, it is likely that other Comintern personnel from Lenin University also worked on prisoners of those nationalities. Since the war the secrecy cloaking these schools has been very dense. We know that Americans are being sent for short term training to Prague, Czechoslovakia. Matt Cvetic, former F.B.I, counterspy in the Pittsburgh area, described to the writer the "holier-than- thou" air about the returning students. Whether this sort of decentralization has diminished the importance of the Moscow-situated schools we do not know. We do know tbat the Soviets officially "abolished'' the Comintern in 1943 as a gesture in return for American war materials. This was strictly a gesture however, and the functions of the once semi- autonomous Comintern were merely attached to the Kremlin apparatus. The only logical conclusion that can be drawn from the entire picture is thai such a successful operation must be continuing. To date our reaction to the Kremlin's political warfare offensive, staffed by these Moscow-trained shock troops, has been about as effective as spears against tanks, or bows and arrows against airplanes. Let us hope devoutly that the recently proposed three-billion-dollar-a-year "Sarnoff Plan." which includes an American political warfare training program for a cold war counterattack againsl communism, will be adopted by President Eisenhower, and that it will reverse the tide that so long has run against tin' cause of freedom. One From One Leaves Two' by OGDCN NASH tiiggledy piggledy, my black hen, She lays eggs for gentlemen. Gentlemen come every day To count what my black hen doth lav. If perchance she lays too many. They fine my hen a pretty pen in . It perchance she fails to lay The gentlemen a bonus pay. Mumbledy purnbledy, my red cow. She's cooperating now. At first she didn't understand That milk production must be planned. She didn't understand at first She either had to plan or burst, But now, the Government reports. She's giving pints instead of quarts. Fiddle-de-dee, my next-door neighbors. They are giggling at their labors. First they plant the tiny seed, Then they water, then they weed, Then they hoe and prune and lop. Then they raise a record crop. Then they laugh their sides asunder. And plow the whole kaboodle under. Abracadabra, thus we learn The more you create, the less you ruin. The less you earn, the more you're given, The less you lead, the more you're driven The more destroyed, the more they feed. The more you pay, the more they need, The more you earn, the less you keep, And now I lay me down to sleep. "Included in the address given hy J. Howard Pew at the Women's Patriotic Conference o'1 National Defense in Washington and reprinted by Guardians Of Our American Heritage. Page 6 FACTS FORUM NEWS, September, 195S
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