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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 007. 1955-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/426.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 007. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/426

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 007, 1955-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/426.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 8, September 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript ks use* ernment official in the West of the warlike nature of communism. The formal college course described above does not however present the whole story, since the students were given practical as well as classroom training. As part-time activity the three-year students were attached to various branches of the Comintern or Profintern (Labor International I for work that took precedence over classes. Kornfeder was attached to the Anglo-American secretariat. He and many other students were also encouraged to write for Pravda and other official organs and to contribute radio scripts for propaganda broadcasts beamed eit the countries of the student s origin. Extra pay was given for ihis kinel of writing. At the end of the course most students Men- required to write a thesis, usually on the subject of their home countries ■is related to some revolutionary theme. But in the cases of certain unusually apt students, private coaching would be substituted. Kornfeder received such coach- mg from Dmitri Z. Manuilsky, then the dean of thc college (later Foreign Minister of the Ukraine). ll was during these private talks that Manuilsky laid down the dictum on Peace" thai recently has had the New York Daily Worker in a froth. What Manuilsky told Kornfeder was this: Weir lo the hilt, between communism ami capitalism, is inevitable. J'eeeleiv. of course, we are not strong enough to attack. Our time will come in twenty or thirty years. To win we shall need the element of surprise. The bourgeoisie will have lo be put to sleep. So we shall begin bj launching the most spectacular peace movement on record. There will be electrifying overlures ami unheard-of concessions. The Capitalist countries, stupid and decadent. u ill rejoice to cooperate in their own destruction. They will leap at another chance to be friends. As soon as their guard is down, we shall smash them with our clenched fist!" I In- \cw York Daily News, alarmed ') I . S. acquiescence lo the projected '''mu Power conference "at the summit," Tote an editorial around this Manuilsky Prediction which bad been published in *1 article in the periodical. Human Events, in 1953. The Daily Worker, with ■font |.eigc fanfare, challenged the News '' reveal its source, claiming that the Wotation did not appear in the published jjorks of Manuilsky in the Library of Congress Probably lhe alleged library research Ns humbug, as any Communist would ""u ibeit such a statement would never 3511 in tin1 exported winks of a high the quotation was missing it no doubt had been removed by "the Ministry of Truth" as in George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-four. The significance of the outburst in the Communist press however is that the Communists are desperately anxious to discredit any intelligence that has leaked out of their revolutionary command center. Kornfeder had a short private interview with Stalin backstage at the Bol- shoi Theater during a ballet. Standing in a little buffet, from which the bartender was dismissed before the conversation began, they talked through an interpreter for a half-hour over black caviar, smorgasbord and vodka. Stalin asked questions about a factional fight in the American Communist party. The impressive thing about the episode is the interest displayed by Stalin in a foreign student and in Ihe politics of lhe American party. During his two-month summer vacations Kornfeder traveled in south Russia and the Caucasus with several other students. On one of these trips, while in the Kuban, the students were startled when the local party secretary was killed by a sniper. A few weeks later at Kislo- vodsk, in a primitive region of the Caucasus, they were awakened in lhe night bj gunfire. In the morning it developed that the resident G.P.U. chief and his No. 2 man had been lured into a mountain ambush and shot. In Moscow Kornfeder reported on his trip to S. Losovsky. a high Comintern official, and described these incidents with some puzzlement. Losovsky at once became very impatient and superior. "You Americans are children in these matters," he snapped. "There is not a single day that from s, fyiel official. At any rate the News' '"'! editorial writer put the Worker ''ally in its place' bv suggesting lhat if ''ACTS FORUM NEWS, September, 1955 —Wlda World Photo William C. Nowell, American Negro who attended Lenin University, testified as a prosecution witness in the Communist conspiracy trial that a 1930 Communist party convention supported setting up a Negro nation in the U. S. He also told of Red activities in the labor movement. ihree to twelve Soviet officials are not .assassinated. The class tear is going on all the time' The experiences of John llladun and William Odell Nowell at Lenin University were roughly parallel to Kornfed er's, though they attended several years later. llladun, a Canadian of I kranian extraction, was drawn into the party through a Greek church social club that Canadian Communists had penetrated. An interesting facet of his story is thai when he sailed for Europe on the way lo Moscow he was instructed to talk tei fellow passengers in the most reactionary language he could devise. Another part of his stor> that also illustrates the precautions taken to keep the Lenin school secret was the handling of his passport. It was taken up bv a "special section" of the Comintern upon his arrival, and he was assigned the cover name of John Logan to use while in Moscow, The point was lhat no student was supposed to know Ihe line names of his classmates. llladun says that there were 6.000 foreign students being trained w he'll he was in Moscow in 1931. Nowell is one of the Lenin University Negroes who has long since become an anti-Communist. Others are Leonard Pal- lerson and Manning Johnson, both of whom have testified before congrcssion- eil committees. Another, Claude Light- foot, is still a Communist and was recently a defendant in a Smith Act trial. and the object of oceans of crocodile tears in the Communist press. While at the school, Nowell had the extraordinary gall to buck a pel idea of Comrade Stalin's. This supposedly all- know ing "leader and teacher of lhe working class" had delivered himself of the' brilliant theory that American Negroes must be encouraged toward "nationalism." This meant that, come the revolution in America, there would be established a "black belt" republic comprising all the southeastern stales from South Carolina through Texas, the while population to be exterminated or transported lo sla\e labor camps elsewhere. Tin \e groes in lhe northern stales were lo be collected int.. enclaves apart from the while's -o thai they could dictate theii own affairs. Nowell, a- spokesman for mosl of the American Negroes then in Moscow, argued lhal American Negroes were trying to get away from segregation, not exaggerate it, and that therefore this was a poor way lo attract them to communism. Needless to say, "the great I Am," Stalin, rejected ihis heresy. Nowell was lucky to get home alive, and there is evidence that the "black belt" theory is still Kremlin poliev. It is also thought tbat a certain prominent Communisl Negro singer has been promised the Commissarship of such a black "Soviel Socialist Republic" I':
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