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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
File 006
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 006. 1955-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/425.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 006. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/425

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955 - File 006, 1955-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/489/show/425.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 8, September 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 8, September 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript show no evidence that he had gone to Russia. When the train crossed the Polish-Soviet border under a huge sign reading "Proletarians of the World Unite," the Communists among the passengers ecstatically chanted the "Internationale." Although the towns along the railroad were in advanced stages of de- . ay. and llie people ragged and emaciated, the exaltation induced by the approach to Moscow, the Holy City of communism, blotted out these impressions. At the Moscow station he hired a droshkv and directed it to 15 Ulice Vorovskaya, the address of the Lenin University, where he found that he was expected. He was assigned to a dormitory room along with two Latin Americans and an Irishman. The university buildings and grounds occupied a square block surrounded by a wooden fence. The main building, which bore no outward sign as to its nature, was the columned former man- sion of a ballerina, said to have been the favorite of the Czar. Her bedrooms were now classrooms and her ballroom the lecture hall. The school had opened in 1925. and in 1927 a second building was pul up. a six-story brick structure with dormitories upstairs, classrooms, library and offices on the ground floor and a cafeteria in the basement. The dormitory rooms held from two to four beds with straw mattresses over boards. There were central heating, showers, and flush toilets. The university accommodated 300 students living on campus and 300 more living outside. Ten per cent of the stu- elents were women and if a couple could show that they had a liaison before entering the school they were assigned a private room together. (The Western University numbered as many or more students, and the Eastern University, alsee known as the Institute for the Toilers of the Orient, took up to 1200. The enrollment at the schools in other parts of thc U.S.S.R. is not definitely known). The rest of the campus was taken up by a 11 ■_• acre drill ground, and a building for weapons training where uniformed Red Army instructors taught the mechanics .■f a dozen type of machine guns, and of hand grenades, rifles, pistols and homemade bombs. Off campus there was a shooting range (shared with the G.P.U.) and an abandoned railroad station and siding where lessons were given in derailing trains and exploding locomotive boilers. Lenin (niversity students were allowed travel expenses to and from Moscow, and 50 rubles (about $13.00) a month pocket money. Also subsistence allowances were paid to dependents left at home. Much of the 50 rubles went into "voluntary" contributions to various Soviel patriotic causes. The curriculum was extremely ardu- Pace 4 ous — to an extent where the students were left little lime to circulate among lhe Russian population. Students were up at 6 a.m. for thirty minutes of calisthenics under a Red Army instructor. Breakfast was at 7 a.m. of black bread eunl red caviar. Classes were from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. with an hour's break for lunch. Then there was lots of homework for the evenings. On Saturdays classes were mil at 3 p.m., but the load of homework allowed little time for outside activity. There were six-month, one-year, ami three-year courses. It was determined during an initial three-month probation period which students were qualified for the longer courses. Perhaps the most significant thing aboul this college was the faculty. The regular teachers were mostly Russians with a few Central and Western Europeans. But the special lecturers were the top hierarchy of world communism. Kornfeder heard Stalin lecture once, Mololov three times, military men such as Tuckachevsky. Vasilicv anil Budenny; and all of the Comintern brass including Dimitrov. Manuilsky. Kiiusinen. Bela Kun, S. Losovsky and Togliatti. Then could be no clearer proof than this of the importance of this political warfare col- lege in Soviet eyes. When a prominent lecturer was talking the entire student body would listen by earphones with simultaneous interpretations. The five languages used were Russian, English, German, French and Spanish. In routine classes, the students were divided up into their language groups with interpreters where needed. The five principal subjects taught al lhe Lenin University were: Leninism. This included conspiratorial operating techniques, agitation and propaganda, and United (Popular) Eront strategy. Party Structure. Organizing for civil war. and the party's function in directing same. Politburo, and district committees. Labor, factory and armed forces fractions and cells; everything modeled on Soviet pattern. Marxian Economics. Das Kapital. anil other textbooks excerpted from Marx eunl Engels. Sonie bourgeois economic theory taught for purposes of argument. History of the Soviet Union. The So- cialist movement in Czarist times. Nihilism, Anarchism. Decembrists, 1905 Revolution, and historv of the Bolshevik Civil War. Secondary subjects of instruction were: Agriculture. The peasant in backward countries. Labor Union Organization. Strike strategy. Local strikes as the prelude to the general strike and more advanced forms of civil insurrection. Front Organizations. (How the Com- —Wide World Pholo Joseph Zack Kornfeder, American graduate of the Lenin School in Moscow, who renounced communism in 1934. niunist tail can wag large segments of the Capitalist dog). Military Training. Sabolage. guerrUl* laities, bomb-throwing, demolition, weapons handling. The above has been greatly condensed from notes taken by Kornfeder while at the Lenin University. It may be valuablf however to reproduce the following note verbatim: Precondition for Successful Arnn'il Insurrection: 1. Economic collapse anil chaos. 2. Demoralization and dissension i" governing circles. 3. Defeat of the government in a foreign war or its inability to keep thing* going as a result of exhaustion following the war. 4. Ability of the party to take advaf' tage of the situation. It is submitted that the above is a per' feet capsule description of China in 1945- And, thanks to the training received I'1 Chinese Communist party cadres in S"' viet schools, the party was able to "taKf advantage of the situation." Among the principal textbooks use* .el the- Lenin school were: On War, by Clausewitz. Construction of the Red Arm) Dnriit'r The Revolution, by A. Ousenko. The Civil War, Military Problem s /'" Civilian, by Bubnov, Kamenev. and tf deman. Red Army And Civil War Politics. I'1 S. T. Gussev. Thc Class War, by Tuckachevsky. Civil War Politics Ami Instirrecli""' (Excerpts from Lenin's writings). A glance at this list ought to coin i'"'' even the most "liberal" educator or p<>»' FACTS FORUM NEWS, September, 1^S
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