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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955
File 026
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 026. 1955-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/375.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 026. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/375

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 026, 1955-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/375.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 5, May 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 026
Transcript Painting shows workmen putting up first Highway No. 40 follows the historic route of [region in 1780. side the governmental estjMishmenl than insiele." Why are we justified in insulting the people of Mississippi by saying that unless the federal governmenl builds roads there, the people of Mississippi don't have enough pride or sense to build roads for themselves? It is probably true lhat if Texas wen left alone lo leiiild her own roads in her own way. the roads of Texas mighl nol look like the roads of Illinois. But it's also true thai unless Texas builds adequate roads, the greal industrial establishments which have been moving to Texas for a number of years will quit moving there. If the forty-eight stales were left alone', they would have to build aderpiate roael systems for purely competitive reasons, if for none other.12 ISitl suppose a state simply doesn't have enough money? The fi-ile-reil governmenl gels all of its funds from people who live in the in- dividual states, and the indebtedness ol the federal governmenl is considerably more than ten times greater than the combined indebtedness of all the stale. county, and municipal governments in the United States." If it wen- not for excessive federal taxes, the states, counties, and local communities could levy enough taxes to build the roads they want. In fact, proceeds from the retail sales taxes on gasoline which people are already pen ing—if usee! to leiiild roads would provide an adequate highway system; and. if so used, they would be the onl) equitable and sensible taxes we have, because they are levied only on tin- people who directly benefit from them. A man who has an automobile ought to help pay for the roads on which he drives the thing. If he uses the roads a great deal, he should pay ei greal deal. If he uses them little or nol al Page 24 —Wide World Photo U.S. 40 highway sign in Ohio back in 1926. the National Pike conceived by George Wash- all, then he should pay little or nol al all.1 If we really heul a profound feiith in the free market principle which lniilt Ihis nation, we would nol assume that only the stale can build roads. Why couldn't roads be built on a private speculative hasis. |hi- way houses eunl skyscrapers are built? Vi hat's wrong with private loll roads, if private in- tlh ielueils want to risk their money in building them? If the federal government were completely oul of lhe highway picture and the stale governments heul access to their own tax resources in their own slates to luiilil what highways they wanted lo build, eunl if the sleile governments al lhe same lime would permit private individuals to build what- ever private toll roads they wanted tu risk their money in. we would ver) likely discover lhal private individuals can build better ami cheaper roads lo ser\e all of the people meen- economically than government at any level can build them." Consider the three basic factors which go into automotive transportation as we know ii today. Thev aire lln- automobile, lln- fuel, ami the road. All three factors arc essential. It docs mi good In have a line' car unless you have adequate fuel for II and a good road. It ileecs nee gen,el lo helve thc fuel unless vou have the automobile. The road is useless jf you don'l have both of the oilier two. How heis ihis system of automotive transport developed in lhe United States? Private initiative has been in control of Iwo of ihe essential factors: lhe fuel and lhe automobile. Government, al one level or another, heis been in control of tin- third factor: roads. Which of these three Factors have- made ihe most progress?" INITIATIVE-WROUGHT MIRACLES Spurred on by lhe incentive e»f profit, private individuals, in voluntary association, have accomplished miracles i" developing automotive transport. I h' main thing lhal has slow<-<l them down is thai the- third essential factor in automotive transport -roads heis been under public, political control and therefore has nol kept pace- wilh lhe develop- HIGHWAY IMPROVEMENTS—Top left photo shows one of the new fog dispellers on the New Jersey turnpike. The dispellers blow smoke and fog off the turnpike, lessening hazardous driving conditions. Motorists could not use the best-lighted stretch of highway in the world (top right) at Richmond, Calif., because it was set up by the University of California *° study roadside lighting. The study was prompted by the great proportion of auto falalitn's occurring at night. Lower left, volunteer workers at Temple, N. H.. have set aside one day ° year for the repair of roads. A town hall meeting decided where volunteer "road gangs' would work. Lower right, workmen laying concrete at a point where the Ohio and Pennsylvania turnpikes meet. r. FACTS FORUM NF.WS, May, '•' .1.5.5 Bents m live.' ' When " wholi- nave laa works, w Commun Mid thai •ppervisi Icians, i Portanee uf nielinl lilll II, "*'T elrix '"' I nil, "'■H leeei, Moreo '"" roe,,I aig tl,,. Paid fee, *"0 use , Toll ,, '""■<■ bee '."-. bee Between ''""1 ih, toads. | '/''I road l"" Publ "'•'in Tl,,. | "v"r a p, J 101-hi % inn,i, ;">' fun •'lr"a,K , F°recan' Ness it *«] lav, 5*ntean " alread How f'opose ""' fine,,, "ACTS
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