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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 020. 1955-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/369.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 020. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/369

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 020, 1955-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/369.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 5, May 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript hatred for Petain. DeGaulle's curious pro-Communist action at Algiers puzzled and worried many Americans al the time. Only a few top military and O.S.S. leaders knew the real reason. When 1'ieiine collapsed in a matter of weeks and the German secret police and Siclie'ilieielsilienst occupied the country, lhe French neglected tu leave behind an underground. Thanks to the Si.vi.t-' highly efficient and we'll or- <3;eni/eil espionage ami sabotage net- work only the French Communists had lhe necessary passport forgers, secrel printing plants, couriers, and other necessary implements fur underground work, li was also well known thai French Communists in the underground wilh characteristic treachery promptly fingered lo the Germans and eilmnst certain de'eilh all strangers emd foreign agents win, bail nol cleared through their network. Gen. DeGaulle simply had lo make ee deal wilh Moscow in order tn gel his 0wn secrel agents and couriers in ami mil nl" occupied France. Once tin- Germans wen' driven out of France, DeGaulle quickly enough broke .iff his affair wilh the Communists. Nevertheless his connivance at the disgrace and condemnation nf Marshal Petain was strictly C.P. line al the lime' anil indefensible on any grounds. DeGaulle also has a greal deal tu answer fur in lhat he eliel little- ur nothing tn stop lhe worst excesses eiml horrors rommitteed during lhe epuration. Huddleston's book also helps deflate one nf the greatest ln.eixes of the hist war the' alleged daring, ferocity, and magnitude uf the French "resistance movement. Our own OWI under lhe direction nf the ineffable Elmer Davis helped enormously in pulling off this bi'j3.-l swindle on the public since the "South Sea- Bubble." Anv American in- telligence officer on the spot eil the lime will tell you that except for the Maquis mosl of lln "In inie French underground" did all of their German-killing iv ith their mouths after lhe war was uver. Except fur snmc telephone ami telegraph line culling, a few blown bridges, sonii. reiibaieiel sabotage, eiml the assassin,iii,,ii of a few isolated German soldiers, the German occupation forces recorded no serious inconvenience traceable to the "heroic French underground" lhat Mrs. Roosevell gushed about. Huddleston estimates lhal less than 3,000 resistance fighters played anv significant role in the Paris area fighting. \ lew in..nibs later when I'aris was alive' wiib Allied troops, no fewer than 125.(100 applications were made for official certificates of service in the IM'.I. Forres Francois de Flnterieur! Huddleston writes: ''In one town lhat I km.w well, there were a few hundred adherents i nf ihe Resistance) until September 1911. when suddenly thousands pul nn armlets Isold fur ei few Page 18 francs) and paraded with th-- real Re- sistants. The scorn uf the real Resistants for the 'Sejilemhrisurtls' is justified." I can testify lhat I saw exactly the same- shabby show in Holland which I entered before the' armistice was signed and while German troops -till clogged the highways. The Dutch underground held played an heroic role, suffered grievous losses but never numbered more than a few thousand I.reive men umi women. As my special task force, attached In Marshal Montgomery's 21-t army group, rushed into Holland In seize certain kev Germans, wc were continuously amazed al lhe hordes "f "resistance fighters'' and "underground workers we mel swarming lhe towns and livweivs wearing orange brassards wilh the letters of the Dutch underground. Heal underground nun told me thev were outraged and dismayed bul helpless lo do anything about these phonies. Al leasl it could be seiid feu- the Dutch fakers thai thev committed few known murders ur other excesses. Iti France the self-elected "hemes of the Resistance" ell lhe price of a couple of francs for em armband, demonstrated their German-killing prowess after the Germans were- genu' by stripping naked girls emd women whn allegedly had consorted with ur merely served Germans .mil parading them through the streets wilh shaved beads and Nazi swastikas painted mi their bare backs with hut tar. The more vicious and criminal elements paid off old grudges againsl their hellers by holding kangaroo courts and condemning In summary executions their luckless enemies or innocent people whose preipcrty ur belongings they coveted. ihi' Communists improved the shining hour hy murdering in cold blood a- "Petainists" or "collaborators" all known anti-Communists including even known Socialists and radicals. Huddleston points .ml lhat some of the worsl real collaborators saved their own -kins l.v ipiirklv changing sides ami joining the murder mobs seeking innocenl victims. Me also confirms Possony and others who have sel the total figure- nf murders during the epuration al 105,000 now generally accepted as official. \-n.rii ein services s,-i the figure al 80,000. li was estimated thai 20,000 persons lust their lives under the Reign of Terror in 1793-1 and lhal 18,000 perished in lhe butcheries nf the Commune of 1,870. \ml this mass murder ..I" mosl known anti-Communists shortly after liberation wun by American and British blood explains why there i- no mil i - Communisl movemenl even todaj worth speaking aboul. Huddleston also correctl) appraised the real secret meaning nl I eheran when he wrote; "In the munth nf December. 1951. Russia wun the war. ll wa- nut on the battlefield lhal the fate' e,f the wnrlel wei- elee ieleel. It weis ;i[ Ti'heran. where. aftlT nieinv demarches, many cajoleries, many flatteries, lhe master of the Kremlin consented tn meet Churchill and Roosevell and was rewarded beyond his wildest hopes by his associates. "Looking back, ii is incredible lhal we should have' consented so completely tu the demands ol Stalin, 'lhe consequences of lhe Teheran surrender were lo Fructify later, but today we- sea' clearly lhat lhe world was made safe for Bolshevism al Teheran. Later conferences merely confirmed the promises there given." And now another "Big Four" conference is coming up with France one of the "big'' four. ibis raises the question "Is France still ei greal power"?" Huddleston tries very hard In convince us thai France despite her ignominous defeat anil disgrace nf the epuration will vet recover her past stature and glory. Bul do great nalions ever come back once they slart In slip from lhe top? In 1939 with " smaller population and no outside economic or military help. France vvas able tu arm and train loo divisions. In 1955. ten years after the Liberation, with practically unlimited American military emd economic aid, France slill pleads total inability tn i-eiise- the- minimum \ VIO quota of ten divisions. Bul if ll"' French seem loath to shoulder a rifle for l.n Ft/trie thev are not coy aboul becoming militant Communists. Despite some recenl small decline in membership l'"' C.I', nf France inn still boast of a quarter of ei million hard core, fanatical members eiml five million supporters a1 lhe bailee! box. Prom James Burnham, "CONTAINMENT OR LIBERATION", page 71: "In France, after more than five billian dollars in grants since the war, not to speak of two rescues from military defeat in a generation, there is not a single newspaper or magazine with an editorial policy that is pr0' American, or even consistently friendly to America." Huddleston's lust chapter .if less than -i\ pages appropriately is devoted to th'' last years and death of Marshal Petain, whom he- calls "the last of the' greal marshals eel' France." The hero of Verdun had hurried back in his beloved fatherland from ei German prison afte' the war. A grateful countr) promptly arrested lhe Pershing eel France, oi''1 him before ei kangaroo courl nf no leu''1' standing, ami sentenced ihe 89-year general i., death. " viluiir.il la-eibv sent a letter attesting In his firm belief i" the marshal's inicgi ih ami sincere devotion lo the securiiv and interests "' France." The death sentence was commuted lo life imprisonment solitaO confinement in an old fortress nn "" island off the harsh Vendean coast- Neither frnm his cell mu the cnuityai'11 (Continued ■ ,„ Page ''■' FACTS FORUM NEWS, May, ''"'' Carrolltoi ' lanton Cullman Dwatui ■ ks„„ Marion Hobi). Ph.nl,, , Sylu. ARK,1 (/'""Ml'leea '.I'al.ai Nly.- '"II,. "ata, •"'■'VCTS
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