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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 019. 1955-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/368.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 019. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/368

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 019, 1955-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/368.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 5, May 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript III.'-- tlU/hUd FRANCE- -The Tragic Years 1939-47. By Sisley Huddleston. Duvire-Adeiir, $5.00. Reviewed by KARL BAARSLAG France The Tragi,- Years 1939-47 is an excellent but misnamed bunk. Huddleston mighl belter have entitled il "The Tragedy of Marshal Petain." Actually it also includes a greal measure uf the tragedy of Sish-v Huddleston, "a Englishman whe obviously loved France far more than he eliel the land of lii- birth. Burn in England in 1883 Huddleston died a French citizen in 1952. He was an internationally famous journalist ami for ;i time served as European correspondenl for lhe Christian Science Monitor. Huddleston's book is indispensable in Understanding French political iitsieil.il- "y l...lay. A nation whose' governments fise ami fall almost wilh ihe frequency of the lilies is obviously already off the stage nf history no mailer how glorious her rule in lhe pasl or how eager her uesire nine more In get the center of 'In- stage. I ImI.Ile-lun. a fine' and sensitive writer, ;e- we-II eis ei sagacious observer, not only stubbornly refuses In Concede this, but tries his best In convince ihe- rest of ihe world lhal France "ill vet recover her -mil and her greatness. Mililarv judgments would seem safer .'"ul sounder In the average layman. 'in- private- opinions nf General Eisenhower ami nlhcr American military ''luli'is on the military potential of ''fiiiicc are well known. British General ■': F. C. fuller, author of "Tunis in ' "r and ;i recognized psychological warfare authority, summed up the estimate succinctly when he told em Anicri- c* magazine: "A truly prudent commander, with Jdvanced forces in Germany, would "*ve to earmark several divisions to Protect his lines of communication it'"ii.jIi frame'. There i- too much dan- -''T nf Communisl disruption and sabotage." General Fuller was then asked u'"'ilier he thought France could be- "nie strung again within a reasonable ll111''. He replied: I eim pessimistic * hundred years, 'itnean war. since aboul that. 11"- been away back in the France heul genuine IV V i lalilv. Ever since 1870 th j&iliti rench have been slipping in terms ol "'"I'iliiv and power." \uv cold-blooded emd realistic appraisal of France's recuperative powers '""-i necessarily include thai of morale. Any book reviewed here may be ordered from Facts Forum for the regular published retail price. Facts Forum pays postage. The seul verdicl of history is thai France wa- bled while and really defeated in World Weir I and never recovered from thai terrible hi Hitting. She managed In hang nn to the end and emerge as a "victor" thanks to her allies. 'Ihis is no disgrace in a once greal country. Our common mother Europe gave birth to many countries lhal rose to great power eiml glory only later lo play mil their rules, exhaust themselves and In sink back into obscurity as fourth-rate powers. Huddleston's bonk attempts two difficult tasks. A primaiv one of rehabilitating the liulv tragic figure of Marshal Petain lo his rightful place in French histor) emd world esteem. The second one ol explaining away France's fatal weakness loss of national pride' ami morale ami convincing the West thai the hind he so deeply loved is really young, beautiful, and strong. I would seev thai Huddleston fails In the latter effort largely by lhe mass of evidence' which he himself produces. Ihe little known story of lhe ghastly mass murders nf well over 100.000 innocenl people including even children eis "collaborators" during the' Liberation by the so-called "heroes "f the French Resistance" is amply confirmed bv Huddleston. American ami either intelligence officers in France at lhe time were fully cognizant of this sickening and disgraceful infamy even though the American press eunl governmenl carefully suppressed the story. The bloodthirsty microphone warriors at Algiers hail screamed over lhe radio beamed tn their homeland thai "two million heads will mil" once Anglo-American forces liberated France. 'lhe fail thai only a hundred thousand perished will presumably be offered as proof uf Communisl magnanimity and restraint. iVor were Communists, according tn Huddleston, ihe sole perpetrators "f these foul murders, tortures, and ails nl mass terror. In the chaos that followed the- retreat of the Germans in their own soil, the prisons wen' emptied uf criminals and then refilled lo the butsiing point with French patriots, innocenl people, and others whose guilt lhe courts themselves could nut finally decide after years of legal i\ leingling. lhe whole poignant story of a great flinch national hero who at the advanced age of eighty was recalled from ei deserved retirement to head up the defeated ami partially captive French slate' is told with sensitive dignity. Huddleston makes nn attempt to disguise his complete admiration fur ami confidence in lhe integrity of Marshal Petain. He confirms mn- own Admiral Leahy's estimation uf the marshal at Vichy. Huddleston paints a truly tragic figure nf an old mililarv hern pathetically striving beyond his feeble powers to salvage something from the total catastrophe into which his beloved country heul been plunged bv "politicians." But if French politicians were' responsible for lhe debacle of 1939 then forty million Frenchmen were in turn responsible for their politicians. The hitler most certainly had not seized power against ihe will of tin. majority nor well' they ei fascist dictatorship. Huddleston was an educated Englishman, lb- certainly musl have been familiar with ih,' "Golden Bough" and other standard works em the history nf human scapegoats. Nor were unprincipled ami base French politicians solely responsible for the moral dry ml thai hail already eaten through the very heart nl frame. I ur a time the total collapse' of France in 1910 in a matter of four weeks stunned eiml baffled tin- world. The I'nlcs fighting lanks wilh cavalry and devoid of air cover bad managed in hold out againsl bolh the Nazi eiml lhe Russians slabbing them in the back for nineteen days. France we held been Inhl bail the "finisi army in the world." Yet two million of these "finest soldiers" surrendered en masse or melted away in the' few weeks of the Blitzkrieg. Thev were demoralized eiml scattered to the wind mil by Hitler's fast-hitting Panzers ami Slukeis but by France's own three horsemen ol the Apocalypse the Communists, Socialists, ami pacifists. Americans might well ponder the real reasons fur France's fall in 1939, We have' lhe same forces working towards the same end in ibis country. Huddleston s severely critical accounl of DeGaulle's role and actions seems ei fair one judged by lhe record. Ih' is. however, wrong in charging DeGaulle wilh espousing the' Communists ami flirting with Moscow because of bis KARL BAARSLAG was a U.S. Navy Intelligence officer attached to the top secret "T Force" under the Combined Intelligence Objectives Subcommittee of SHAEF. He landed in France shortly after the liberation of Paris and was assigned to Marshal Montgomery's 21st Army Group as Special U.S. Navy Representative for the invasion of Holland and Northwest Germany. While France itself was outside his field of interest he did learn from other American intelligence officers in France of the mass murders, atrocities, and bank robberies by the French Communists, semi-criminal elements, and hoodlums perpetrated as our troops drove the Germans out of France. Commander Baarslag was the first American naval officer to reach Kiel with the special British "T Force" which seized the great naval base before Admiral Donitz had surrendered northwest Germany. !■' 4CTS FORUM NEWS, Man. 1955 Page 17
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