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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 014. 1955-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/363.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 014. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/363

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 014, 1955-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/363.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 5, May 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript up from thc Formosa Straits area to Manchuria, where it could operate from a United Nations-guaranteed sanctuary against Americans in Korea. Because of the United Nations, Chinese Communists could fly their Soviet planes across the Yalu River and attack our men: Init our air force couldn't strike hack. e\ i'ii in hot pursuit.1" \flei MacArthur was gone. General Van Fleet—despite all the restrictions and handicaps placed upon him—was severed times in position to destroy the Chinese Communist armies: l.ul I nited \aiinns policy would not permit it. ' Tne Korean war was supposed lo be ;i weir between I N forces and Communist forces. These Communisl forces were armed and trained by the Soviet Union. They wen- advised by Russian experts, and their airplanes were flown by Russian pilots. Russian officers even commanded sections of the Communist armies; yet all the while Russia remained in the United Nations and on the Security Council and presumably had access lo I nited Nations battle plans.20 In April. 1953. we entered a good- faith agreemenl with lhe Communists in Korea to exchange eill sick and wounded prisoners.21 On the day lite exchange began, American fliers sent up to watch the progress ,,f the operation in accordance with tin' agreements—had to fight their way through Communist antiaircraft fire. PRISONER EXCHANGE HOAX They reported hundreds of enem) —Wide World Photo General James Van Fleet pictured with Korean youngster during visit to Seoul orphanage in 1952. trucks rolling along in broad daylighl on the roads designated for transporting American prisoners to the point of exchange. The trucks bore the specified markings which kept our men from attending them. But they wen' not carrying prisoners. Thev were' using the monstrous hoax nf prisoner exchange to bring up ammunition and supplies for their frnni line troops.22 Decency and honor not to mention the niilitarv necessity of protecting the lives of our own soldiers ~ln>illil have demanded thai we sleep the disastrous pretense of prisoner exchange and hit the Heals with everything wc had. But —Wide World Photos BARRIERS ON THE ROAD TO PEACE IN KOREA—Top photo, North Korean soldier armed with Russian-made burp gun shown outside his camouflaged guard post near the house used by UN peace delegation at Kaesong in July, 1951. Below, UN forces correspondents enroute to cover Kaesong conference were stopped by Communists who would not permit them to proceed further. Photo at right shows North Korean soldier who moved himself squarely in front of an AP photographer's camera in an attempt to prevent him from taking pictures at Panmunjom. The enemy soldier was guarding the neutral truce area. Pane 12 we didn't. We couldn't. The prisoner exchange hoax was ei United Nations arrangement. \ I nited Nations commission headed by pro-Communist India supervised the oner at ion. We wenl through with it.23 >7 Wi- returned over si\ thousand sick and wounded Communist soldiers. They returned one hundred and twenty Americans. And wc knew they were holding back thousands of Americans in desperate need of decenl hospitalization. Bul we couldn't do anything aboul It. This was a I nited Nations affair. And Russia alone heis three' votes in the UN lei our one not lo mention all of the Communist puppet states whose I N votes the Soviets controlP3 During the Korean trues talks, the Communists, in violation of their own initial agreemenl. required our representatives to come, while flags in hand, to a neutral /one under ihe muzzles eef Communisl guns, looking to all the world as if we were begging for terms. While the lalks wen- going on. we knew thai the Communists wen' stalling for lime to rebuild on their side of the i nice line in violation of the truce agreements airfields which we had destroyed,22 COMMUNISTS USE UN MEGAPHONE From the beginning of the' Korean war. we began amassing concrete evidence on Communisl atrocities com* mitted againsl our soldiers taken pri«- oners. We presented lliis documented proof to the United Nations but wen' unable t>. get the I nited Nations even to pul the mailer on the agenda for discussion. At the same time, however. the I nited Nations permitted itself I" be used eis an international megaphone for broadcasting the Communisl lies aboul American germ warfare i" Korea."' The final armistice terms in Korea were dictated by the Communists ein'' written by pro-CommunisI India. 'I I"' Communists began violating the term8 the day they were signed. UN negotiators. Major General U "' Craigie (left) and Vice Admiral C. TurneJ Joy (center) shown as they left the f'rS Kaesong peace conference July 10, 1951. T° walk past a bemedaled Chinese guard *"f Russian-made burp gun. FACTS FORUM NEWS, May, Iff* ..""an i '."' ten ■ "ili-d iS kodlono ?»iv ,.: ''Acts
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