Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955
File 013
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 013. 1955-05. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/362.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-05). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 013. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/362

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955 - File 013, 1955-05, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/419/show/362.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 5, May 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 5, May 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date May 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript sesu»'f b) 111, ilioiis Oj sm a"H liable « control- inter sitio" in- eil in of dustries wen' nearly all destroyed; and il was being supported, in greal pari, by American military and economic aid. It weis despised all over lhe world. The Chinese people, for instance, feared mid haled the Soviets as much as they loved their old friends, the Americans. All of this was ten years ago in the year theit the United Nations was form- '.I. Since then. Soviet power has ex- panded until today il directly enslaves one-third of the population of the earth. one-fourth of the world's land surface." Meanwhile, America has reached a point of desperation and isolation from People' who used to he our friends all over lln- world and all of ihis despite the fact thai during those ten years we have poured out the tax money and resources of tin- American people with an openhanded generosity unparalleled in history, hying lo help the very people ^ "ho now seem to hale us or who want •o remain neutral in lhe struggle between us and the Soviets.' WHY PATRIOTS CRY During those ten years America, 'nighlv and magnificent, heis suffered >uch national humiliation as to bring tears to the eves of any true Vmerican Patriot. lito. the Communisl tyrant ,,! "l ugo- s'a\ia. shooting down American planes and murdering American soldiers! We fewarded him wilh billions of dollars ?' economic and military aid which he ,s slill gelling. American soldiers arrested on trump- '''up charges ami imprisoned in lhe ''""lit juils of a seventh-rate power like Hungary! We p.del ransom money to Bet th.in .mt. \piil. 1950 Soviet fighter planes 'U-vxi / U/ -Wide World Photo y TITO GETS THE BIRD—President Tito of B^OS'av'a fondles white carrier pigeon in ^ '?r"de in May of last year after the bird .. '^ered greetings to him on his sixty-second "rhdoy. ACTS FORUM NEWS, May, 1955 shot down a United States Navy plain- over the Baltic Sea. killing ten Americans. The United Slates government protested.'" November. 1951—Soviel planes shot down a United Stales P2V over the Japanese Sea. The entire American cre« weis lost. The' I nited Stales government protested.10 October. 1952 -Soviel fighters shot down an American li-29 off lhe Kurile Islands. Eight Americans were lost. The 1 nited Slates government protested.10 Jnly. 1953 Soviet plane' shot down a United Slales plane off Siberia. Sixteen Americans were lost. The' United States governmenl protested.10 September, 1951 Soviel planes shot lie,w n a 1 nited Stales \el\v fighter off Siberia. One American lost. The' United Slates governmenl protested.10 fHONSHU Sendai JAPAN --jTOKYO Yokohama \tJP\ Pacilic Ocean STATUTE MIUS —Wide World Photo THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PROTESTED—Map locates Habomai Islands off the coast of the Japanese island of Hokkaido, where the Reds shot down a U.S. B-29 on October 7, 1952. On September 25, 1954, the United States demanded that Russia pay ST,620,295.01 damages for the "incident." The U.S. also denied Soviet claims to the Habomais, which Japan also claims. November, 1951 Soviet plane shot down a U.S. B-29 off the Kurile Islands. One American lost. The United Slales governmenl protested.10 Iii all instances, our protests brought nothing hut insulting replies. lu November, 1951. when the American Presidenl was eeskeal to comment on all of this, he expressed high hopes for peace because, in connection with the latesl Soviel outrage, the Soviet alliliuli'. held been less insulting than before.1 Consider whal lias happened to America's position in the Far Fast during the ten years of our reliance upon lhe United Nations to keep peace' in the world. In 1915-Id. America's emissary lo China General George C. Marshall— —Wide World Photos Top, in March of 1 946, General George C. Marshall boarded a reconnaissance car preparatory to leaving for Communist headquarters at Yenan. Below, Marshall inspects Chinese Communist troops at Yenan. Left to right, Mao Tse-tung, Chou En-lai, Marshall, National General Chang Chih-chung, and Communist Commander in Chief Chu Teh. on three separate occasions saved the Communisl armies from destruction bv forcing an armistice in lhe civil war which Chiang Kai-shek's fences were winning. Marshall kept Chiang from gelling economic aid which the American Congress had voted for him.18 Meanwhile, I nited Nations member Russia was arming North Korea ami the Chinese Communists—in violation of lhe UN Charier: but lhe UN eli.l nothing. HELP FOR CHIANG SCUTTLED Entire boatloads of equipment deesig- nated for Chiang's governmenl were dumped in the Indian Ocean. The Chi- nese governmenl which weis friendly to .America was driven from the Asian mainland; and 600 million Chinese who used lo he our friends became the tools and slave-s of the Communists.18 The first (liri'i i resull of all ihis was the Korean war the firsl weir the I nited Stales ever lost. The I nited Nations made us lose it. After General Mac-Arthur's brilliant maneuver which landed American troops behind enemy lines at Inchon and pul them in position to destroy the mediocre' North Korean Communisl army, 1 lie I nited Nations Mililarv Command stopped MacArthur eil the 38ih parallel and held him there for nearrj three weeks. During tln.se three weeks the Chinese Fourth Army weis moved Page li
File Name uhlib_1352973_v004_n005_013.jpg