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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
File 052
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 052. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/261.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 052. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/261

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 052, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/261.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 052
Transcript camps, the emphasis on heavy industry and the military, and the entire apparatus of terror remains intact. There is some evidence that hunger and discontent at home prompted Khrushchev to denounce Stalin. If Khrushchev can convince the peoples of the USSR that their unhappy plight is due to Stalinism, he may be able to appease them for the time being. It is also conceivable that Khrushchev is preparing a purge of his political enemies by associating them with Stalin. This purge of pro-Stalinites is even more likely to occur outside the Soviet Union. Recent issues of the Daily Worker for example contain somewhat conflicting interpretations of Stalin's status by editor Alan Max, chairman William Z. Foster, and Joseph Clark. Various letters to the editor also indicate a certain amount of confusion among the party faithful about future attitudes. It is even conceivable that a shake-up in party leadership may occur in 1956 in somewhat the same fashion that it did in 1945 when Earl Browder was replaced as party chairman by William Z. Foster. "Step Up Anti-Communist Efforts" What can the United States do to frustrate the objectives of the international Communist movement as outlined at the 20th Congress of the Communist Party of the USSR? Our government should make it very clear to the American people and to freedom- loving peoples throughout the world that there is no basic change in Soviet policies. The Soviets want us to lower our guard and distract our attention to side issues. This is precisely the time to step up anti-Communist efforts both at home ancl abroad. This means more vigorous prosecution of anti-Communist legislation, stepped- up exposure of Communist activ ities by congressional committees, and published warnings by governmental officials of the dangers inherent in the new Communist tactics of the united front. There must be no repetition of Communist penetration of American society such as took place in the 1930s. In this respect, the current activities by the United States government against the Daily Worker and Communist Party headquarters throughout the United States are a step in the right direction. New legislation should be enacted providing a 15-year jail sentence and a 810,000 fine for those convicted of advocating the violent overthrow of the United States Page 50 government or belonging to an organization so advocating. Use of mechanical devices in federal cases involving security should also be acted upon. The United States should pass to the offensive in the anti-Communist effort at home. In the realm of foreign policy, the United States has a unique opportunity to pass on to the offensive, in order to take advantage of the weaknesses within the USSR, and the confusions in Marxist ranks throughout the world. Plans must be readied to give maximum assistance to revolts on tbe Hast German pattern. The long-neglected Sarnoff plan for "cold warfare" against communism should be carried out. Trade between nations of the free world and the Communist bloc which might in anv way strengthen communism should cease. The two hundred items declassified in 1951 at the insistence of France and Britain should be restored to the list of nontradeable goods. Fraternization with Soviet diplomats and officials should be kept to an absolute minimum. We must not permit ourselves to be maneuvered into another Big Power conference where the basis for success is the partition of a small country ancl the establishment of a "neutral" nations commission, as happened at Panmunjom and Geneva. We should make clear our support of Free China, including thc offshore islands, and overseas Chinese harassed in such areas as Singapore and Indonesia. This support of Free China must logically involve al American willingness to defend Nationalist China diplomatically, especially in the UN, and to use every weapon to prevent admittance Communist China into that organization. We must also make clear oul support of the Republic of Korea, ano consider appropriate sanctions against those who persistently violate the Parr munjom agreement. Support of freedom in Asia includes also such anfr Communist governments as Souw Vietnam, Laos, Thailand, the Philippines, and Pakistan. Our aid programs in Asia should take into consideration the consistently pro-Chinese ComnW nist positions of states like India. Burma, and Indonesia. In Europe *e should resolutely push forward in tW integration of German armed force5 with existing NATO forces. Wher« possible, we should disassociate ourselves from colonial regimes in the Mediterranean area, to prevent Communists from being confused wit*1 bona fide nationalists. Our foreign policy theme must f liberation from Communist tyranny- and opposition to a world half sla** and half free. If the peoples behind the Iron and Bamboo Curtains kiiO"* for a certainty that we stand on the" side, without compromise, the force* which caused Khrushchev to denounce Stalin will grow, and revol15 on the East German pattern will become a possibility. And this time "*•* must be prepared to act. ei" Stalinism Continues (Continued from page 8) dustry, and its relations with its satellites. Unfortunately, the leadership of the democratic world has not done enough to exploit these weaknesses and impair the prestige and power of the Communist war lords. Self-deception in regard to the 20th Communist Party Congress would only aggravate this failure on the part of the free world. The recent Congress under Khrushchev did not forswear a single one of its old basic policies of intolerance toward non-Communists and violence as a means of getting results. The anemic posthumous purge of Stalin does not constitute a repudiation of, or a break with bis basic policies for agriculture, the primacy of heavy in dustry, ancl secondary attention ■* consumers' goods. Furthermore, "f ('ongress has reasserted unanimouW that the foreign policy of the US'" has been continuously correct ancl to peace — during and after Stalin. I'"' of course, means Soviet policy in r gard to disarmament, as well as -, policy toward Germany, Korea, •* Indochina. Had the 20th Communist Congl*** decided on a genuine and serin'1, purge of Stalin and Stalinism, it won' have acted not merely against " dead despot but first of all against t*1 leading surviving Stalinists. Ilowi-v1'. it is precisely these figures who cons" tiitt* the present so-called collect1* leadership. Facts Forum News, September, 1" Otie-
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