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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
File 050
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 050. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/259.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 050. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/259

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 050, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/259.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 050
Transcript asked Mr. Hurleigh. "Yes," replied Mr. Streibert. "It extends to all kinds of relationships other than travelers and tourists, however — businessmen writing letters — there are all sorts of scientific intercourse back and forth and many, many relationships. It should enter into all of them." "And you want," added Moderator Hurleigh by way of clarification, "to make each one of these individuals more or less understand the problems of this country so that he can intelligently discuss them and make friends for the United States when he does go abroad in business or otherwise." Mr. Streibert indicated agreement with this interpretation. Mr. Prina next questioned Mr. Streibert — "You told Congress in mid-1954 that USIA had stepped up markedly its operations in Thailand in order to alert that country to the dangers of Red colonialism. However, recent reports from Bangkok indicate that Thailand is swinging away from the United States camp to a neutral position. Do you see that this indicates any failure of USIA or the Voice to get the message across to these people?" Mr. Streibert demurred, "No — we feel that it is not swinging to any neutral position as against or away from the United States in favoring communism. We think that they are as much against communism as they have ever been, and understand the subversive characteristics of the international Communist conspiracy. There will be changes of a minor character from time to time, but we don't feel that Thailand's allegiance is changing. After all, it's a member of the SEATO Pact." Activities Geared to Foreign Policy Asked by Mr. O'Connor if he felt that the USIA program has actually enhanced our general prestige abroad in the short time it has been operating, Mr. Streibert replied, "You are touching on a point that i.s rather basic, because we can't, by propaganda or words, or by an information campaign, do more than our foreign policies and actions warrant and permit. We think we have aided in innumerable ways to help accomplish our objectives In the various countries of the world. In some cases the objectives have not been achieved to as great an extent as we would like. On the other hand, we have been conspicuously successful on Page 48 many other objectives. One of the best examples is the President's program for the peaceful uses of atomic energy. We have done an enormous job with all kinds of literature and picture exhibits — and have used every possible means of communication to put that program over around the world. It is understood ancl it is over. Of course, it still has great potentiality for further development. But to your question regarding whether the USIA PROVOCATIVE PROSE The present world struggle is much more than a contest in armaments and economies. It goes deeper than that and touches the souls of men. . . . The laws which control the orderly movement of our world are not economic male- rialism . . . but these problems can be solved only by free men. ... If we keep the faith and maintain free minds, still new horizons and new frontiers will open to us. revealing daily new areas of adventure and enterprise, new vistas of beauty and belief. — Hi inn ii i Hoover In this bold experiment, external assistance from friendly countries is gratefully accepted but so as not to inculcate in our people a psychology of dependence on such assistance. For in the last analysis, economic development of a country can only come about through tbe wholehearted efforts of its people; external aid can act as a catalyst, can supplement but cannot supplant national effort. — (;. I.. Mill IV Congressional Kccord Ambassador of India program has generally enhanced our prestige abroad, I say 'yes.' We do feel that we are able to add to the beneficial effects of good policies in countries where we are accomplishing our objectives." Rumors of Ceylon VOA Censorship "Mr. Streibert, is USIA running into any difficulty," inquired Mr. Prina, "either in the free world nations or in the so-called neutrals, in presenting your program? I refer specifically to a report out of Ceylon that there might be censorship of Voice of America programs as the new government took over." "No, we don't have difficulty," replied Mr. Streibert, "in the sense that we must plan our program — gear it, so to speak — to each individual country dependent on the circumstances. Some are out and out allies of the United States and anxious for us to help them, as well as to help us effect public opinion as against communism and in support of democratic government. Others are in a more neutral position, and are not very anxious to have us so active where, let us say, our relations are more of a cultural nature. The particular case in Ceylon was no great difficulty, because it was perfectly within their rights. The broadcasting stations we are using are on their land although they were built by us. They have the right, according to our agreements, to look at the scripts and see what we are saying. We were perfectly happy to arrange that." Helps Democratic Process Anywhere Mr. Prina asked Mr. Streibert if he had approved — after thc fact became known — USIA action in Italy in lending a sound truck to one faction in 3 union election in a manufacturing company, an action which had been earlier reported by Mr. Castle. "That wits a routine matter that \#* would elo anywhere at any time," replied Mr. Streibert. "If we can help the democratic process, we will do so- "It is the policy of your agency, Mr- Streibert," questioned Mr. Hurleigh "to help the democratic parties in each of these countries wherever possible? "That is right. That is our basic yardstick wherever we can overcom6 communism.'' Mr. Streibert mentioned that th" USIA has methods of checking up '" the various countries regarding whid1 methods are more successful in receiving and imparting information, an'1 stressed that the L'SIA stall' is exped in gauging results of the various kind* of meetings. He replied in the negative to i question from Mr. Hurleigh regarding whether we have overlapping of info-" mation agencies abroad that tend •" create ineffectiveness, as in the rivaW between branches of our armed ser*-' ices. Clarifying his opinion, he state" that we operate in each country und6' the Ambassador or Chief of the MlS' sion, as ;i part of the country team- "We are one of the Embassy," state" Mr. Streibert, "and our staff operate in complete cooperation and uni" with them." &" Facts Forum News, September, 1$
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