Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
File 049
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 049. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/258.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 049. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/258

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 049, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/258.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 049
Transcript Interview of THEODORE C. STREIBERT Rebuttal of Critic's Charges Approaching the area of questioning related to .■hinges made by Mr. Eugene Castle on an earlier Reporters' Roundup program (reported in Facts Forum Xews, August, 1956) as well as before the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee, Mr. O'Connor asked: Critics have said since the separation °f the U. S. Information Agency from the State Department in 1953, that it snould not exist as a separate agency. They have said that its — I'll use the Word 'propaganda,' since I think we ire in a battle of semantics — that its Propaganda is not effective, and is having, if anything, an adverse effect. Obviously," he presupposed, "you Would heartily disagree with the argument that the USIA should be again merged with the State Department. "Ut will you tell us why you would disagree with that?" "We operate many media of communications," Mr. Streibert outlined. such its all the broadcasting stations and motion picture production. We "Penile a press sendee, publish books. translations, conduct libraries. And we "ave an operating function which is ""t normally the function of the State department, which is really a policy - "■aking body. We can acquire the nec- '"-Vm skills, whereas the State Department is operated primarily by for- '"'"n service officers alone." Charges Labeled "irresponsible" One of the arguments of one of Vour — probably your chief critic, Eu- tene Castle, who has written a book r<'cciitK criticizing your agency," stat- (,(' Mr. O'Connor, "and I am quoting r°m an interview on this program recently - he said, 'We have already ■Pent 700 million dollars for worthless Propaganda. We arc no better off to- -*>' (linn the day we spent the first ™llar!' lb- was speaking of money Appropriated for and spent bv the l'Sl.\." Well. I think that is wholly irre- sl"»isil>le." said Mr. Streibert. Mr. Prina mentioned that Mr. Castle als<) had said that the USIA was a «Uge for Madison Avenue hucksters **i>d pitchmen and that consequently •* agency was trying to merchandise America abroad like they would try to t. Af-Ts Forum News, September, 1956 (Continued from page 17) sell soap here. "What is your comment on that?" be asked. "I think we do feel that the United States has a great success and experience in communication techniques.'' stated Mr. Streibert. "Now, we obviously are fully aware that you don't sell ideas and foreign policy the way you sell soap, so there is nothing to that. We feel that we fully understand the distinction and we are promoting our policies and promoting understanding of the United States in the field in a way that i.s well adapted to the particular circumstances of each country." Mr. Prina referred to the recent USIA plan to distribute 200,000 copies abroad of the book Profile of America. "You once said," he pointed out, "that you were not afraid of congressional criticism, yet when one or two congressmen objected to a picture in the book, in a poem by Thoreau. USIA backed away very meekly. Do you cue to comment on that?" Congressional Report — A Mandate "I am glad to have the opportunity," stated Mr. Streibert forthrightly, "because we feel we should be sensitive to congressional criticism, although we should not be at all timid about it. We took the statement in the House Appropriations Committee report, that this should not be used, as a mandate. We feel that it would be foolhardy rather than courageous to defy the stated wishes of a congressional appropriations committee." Mr. O'Connor asked if Mr. Streibert felt thai any lack of confidence in the USIA program was exhibited bv Con gress in "hacking up" 1'SIA's requested budget for the next fiscal year from a requested 135 million to about 110 or 115 million dollars. "On the contrary," replied Mr. Streibert, "we feel that the part of Congress that traditionally has the closest examination of the agency's expenditures is in the House. The House voted a little over a 30 per cent increase over last year, and this we felt to be a very fine warranty of their belief in our operations, particularly since there was no critical comment on the floor when the bill was passed." "There is another area of criticism in which the USIA is involved," pointed out Mr. Prina. "Recently a Dallas patriotic group objected to the inclusion of several paintings by Mr. Leon Crowe, an artist, in a package of art being sent abroad on exhibition. Now, isn't it true that two of Mr. Crowe's murals hang in the Attorney General's office, who is our chief officer for internal security? And I wonder what the thought was in blocking Mr. Crowe's art?" Mr. Streibert pointed out that there had been "no intent to block Mr. Crowe as an individual." "Someone said they were painted nineteen years ago," he continued, "but we are not concerned with him as an individual." President's Neve- Diplomatic Program Moderator Hurleigh introduced the subject of President Eisenhower's recommendation that a new diplomatic program be explored. "Mr. Streibert," lie sidd, "the President has invited a group of Americans representing many fields of activity to meet here in Washington at the White House to explore the possibilities of a program for what is being known at the present time as a 'people-to-people' contact and partnership throughout the world. What is this all about?" he asked. "And what is behind this meeting the President lias culled0" "We think this is a wonderful development," replied Mr. Streibert, "because in the struggle we are engaged in the government cannot do the job alone. It is too big a job. In fact, even in a democracy, part of tbe element of the democratic system is that the people themselves participate. Now. all kinds of activities in this country have connections abroad of one nature or another. Ancl if the whole nation, as it presents itself to foreigners in various countries around the world is try ing to make America better understood, trying to interpret our policies. trying to display the friendship which we feel, and trying to convince others that this countrv really stands for peace, we think it will have a great effect over all on the ultimate course of our relations with the rest of the world." "This is that personal ambassadorship we were discussing earlier0" Page 41
File Name uhlib_1352973_v005_n009_049.jpg