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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
File 047
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 047. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 25, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/256.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 047. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/256

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 047, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 25, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/256.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 047
Transcript -THE CASE FOR FLUORIDATION" dishvv ashing, and bathing for each member of the average family is less than 10 gallons per day. In spite of this low percentage of water consumption required to meet all domestic requirements, hundreds of municipal Water supplies are softened or treated for the removal of color, taste, odor, and are sterilized with chlorine at treatment costs many times greater than the cost of fluoridation. Yet these processes are likewise required for only that small percentage of water used for direct human needs. In the last fifty years these improvements in the quality of public water supplies have saved the lives of millions of persons who would otherwise have died of vvaterborne diseases.89 Thc cost of fluoridation is extremely small, and public health and water engineering practices relatively simple. At present prices, it ranges from $1.40 l<> S-i.20 per million gallons. The total amortized cost of fluoridation, including the cost of the chemicals, of the feeding equipment, tod additional labor required, varies between 5 cents and 2(1 cents per person per year. The saving which will r<'siilt for every American family in bwered dental bills vvill amount to hundreds of times that family's proportionate cost of fluoridation." Opposition Lacks Scientific •■Wtience There are sonic physicians and dentists of good standing who have questioned the salelv of water fluoridation. *n no instance, however, have they "'Vi-ii evidence which has been substantiated that the ingestion of water ■Uorides at the recommended concen- *ration is in any way harmful. Their ••Pinions are purely personal since jjhey have nol matched the evidence Presented in scientific studies which demonstrate the safety and elfective- "('ss of witter fluoridation.40 When it is considered that there ,lr(' approximately 216,000 physicians ;l"d 92,000 dentists in this country, it ls not unusual to find a lew who ques- ™°n tin- safety of anv new public "t'alth practice. If vaccination or pas- '''ni/.ition of milk or chlorination "I W;'hi supplies, all of which met with ^olcnt opposition when hist intro- "eed and even today have some opposition in ;i few professional men, '""*' considered, it is not difficult to "•derstand win some professional t- A< is Forum News, September, 1956 people oppose water fluoridation. Yet no one can deny today that these public health practices have contributed immensely to the improved health of our people following their universal acceptance.40 There is also an active, proselyting opposition that does not represent an objective, scientific point of view at all. A vociferous minority has developed which has succeeded in some areas in delaying initiation of water fluoridation programs, and even, at limes, in actually reversing favorable action.41-42 This opposition seeks to defeat proposals for fluoridation by the circulation of pamphlets containing obsolete or discredited or irrelevant charges ranging from "Operation Bat Poison" to "communistic plot" themes, with a measure of food faddism included.'- Delaney Committee Conclusions Disputed The Delaney Committee was a House Select Committee To Investigate the Use of Chemicals in Foods ami Cosmetics of the 82d Congress. Only a portion of the testimony this committee considered in the early months of 1952 concerned fluoridation. While this small congressional committee described fluoridation as a calculated risk, their observation represents onlv the personal opinion of a majority and has no official standing or meaning. A great mass of contrary evidence completely refutes their conclusions. It is significant that the city of Washington, D. C, adopted and began the practice of fluoridation after the Delaney Committee hearings had been concluded.4' 'Ihe Committee's Report is disappointing in that it (1) failed to give due emphasis in the better evidence in the Hearings and (2) sought for perfect and complete knowledge in a scientific field unlike that demanded of any other in which reliable data for day-to-day application are available. The evaluation of the need for fluoridation in a given community and Ihe assurance of the benefit to be expected from such a local program can best be made by members of the dental profession. Any group of physicians would be presumptuous in setting themselves up as better judges of these points than the dentists of the community and of the various Health Services.44 No evidence of harm to any industrial process from the use of water containing as little as one ppm of fluoride has been published. On the contrary, there is much testimony, based upon investigation in their own laboratories, that the products of bakers, dinners, ancl brewers will suffer no deleterious effect.44 Analysis of Mortality Data An analysis of mortality data has been compiled by the Division of Dental Public Health of the Public Health Service from 1949-50 Census Reports, relating to death from nephritis, cancer, and heart disease for twenty-eight fluoride and sixty non- fluoride cities. Only cities having a population of ten thousand or greater were selected for the analysis. The fluoride cities have 0.7 or more ppm of fluorine in their drinking water supplies. The non-fluoride city group is comprised of the three cities with fluoride-free water closest to each fluoride city. These data arranged according to death rates reveal a marked homogeneity. For nephritis, thirteen of the cities fall below and fifteen above the median; for cancer, fifteen are below ancl thirteen above; and for heart disease, sixteen fluoride cities are below the median and twelve are above." Similar mortality data have been compiled for Grand Rapids, Muskegon, and the United States for each of the eight successive years beginning in 1943, also including mortality rates for intracranial lesions. These statistics reveal the expected greater fluctuations ancl variability in the Grand Rapids and Muskegon annual rates than for the United States. Grand Rapids mortality rates for nephritis are consistently below those for both the United States and Muskegon. Both Grand Rapids and Muskegon tend to have higher rates for cancer, heart disease, and intracranial lesions than comparable rates for tbe United States. However, in each case Grand Rapids rates are either similar or lower than those for Muskegon.'"' lll.uk. A. P., Ph.D., "Facts in Befutation of Claims b) Opponents ol Fluoridation," Coiuutn stonol Record, May 21). 1956. pp. 8242-45. ■"Newburgfa-Kingston final report, op. eil. ••Ihiil. '-St. Louis Medical Society, op. eil. "Black, op. cit. "St. Louis Medical Society, op. cit. *-'Kinits„n, op. eil. Page 45
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