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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
File 038
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 038. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/247.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 038. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/247

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 038, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/247.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 038
Transcript LJ>m\z; l\<ZAliftiJLW VIOLENT TRUCE By E. H. Hutch/son Devln-Adoir Co., 23 E. 26lh St., New York 10, N. Y., 1956. 199 pp. $3.50. Commander Hutchison, after service as an observer in the Mixed Armistice Commission in Jerusalem from November, 1951, took over the appointment as Chairman of the Commission in the summer of 195.3, which post he held until November, 1954, all under the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization. In early 1956 he completed this record of his experiences in the Middle East — a record rounded out with maps, tables of statistics, camera shots, and specific case histories. The new nation of Israel is on terms just short of all-out warfare with the three border states, Svria, Jordan, and Egypt. Why? Because, says Hutchison, Israel's neighbors are dissatisfied with tbe existing Arab-Israel border line, which is guaranteed by the Tripartite Powers — the United States, the United Kingdom, and France; and which in many instances separates non-Israelis from their farms and from their sources of water and livelihood. Dissatisfaction exists because infiltration, smuggling, and reprisals have become commonplace; because Israel "refuses to talk of repatriation or territorial adjustments." Commander Hutchison thinks the danger of war is imminent because to the Arab Nations "Israel's constant call for immigration — the ingathering of all Jews — means just one thing: eventual expansion." He says the danger is great because world Zionists have given Israel's "activists" a false sense of security, hence Israel claims "world political pressure that will bring backing for her every demand." Communists in the USSR and in Czechoslovakia are more than interested spectators. They have shipped Page 36 arms to the Arabs, made overtures to Egypt, are obviously trying to move in on the rich oil fields, the productive lands, the convenient seaports of this favored area. The major deterrent to the spread of Sovietism is religious, not political, Middle Asia being preponderantly Moslem. The following quotations from his book sum up Commander Hutchison's observations: "An inescapable impression of the traveler in Israel is that the military takes precedence over everything. . . . With all that stands to Israel's credit today, a close study reveals some dis turbing facts. Here is a small country, armed to the teeth, strong in national spirit but sorrowfully lacking in foresight. With little to offer in natural resources, Israel is today tottering OD an economic structure that is totally dependent on outside financial and technical aid, primarily furnished by the United States." "The Powers who, with the desire to furnish asylum for Jewish refugees, backed the establishment of the State of Israel, now realize that by doing so they did not reduce the number of displaced persons in the world. The 900,000 Arab refugees, living in misery, are a grim reminder of this fact. "The task of Israel today is to seek recognition as an asset rather than a threat to the Middle East." SOCIAL SECURITY-Fact and Fancy By Dillard Stokes Henry Regnery Co., 20 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4, III., 1956, 208 pp. $4.00. Here is a concise history and exposition of Social Security as a whole subject, not just a fragment of certain aspects of the matter, as has been set forth in a total of 86,655,000 copies of thirty different booklets and leaflets put out by the Social Security Administration between 1950 and March 1, 1955. The first Social Security law was voted by Congress in 19.35 and, though limited, was definite ancl sound; there was no way a worker could lose money he paid into the system. The Act guaranteed that he or his estate would get it back with interest, while the 1935 Act was in force. Congress, however, reserved the right to alter tbe Act at vvill. This reservation kept Social Security from being a genuine contract between worker ancl government — a provision which many did not grasp. The second Social Security Act (1937) was of brief duration. It was an alteration of the first, ancl officially represented the theory that Social Security was not an insurance-and-annu- ity setup, but rather a public general- welfare program — on a tax, not 3 premium basis. On the theory th*' Social Security was a benevolence U1' stead of a business, the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the Act. Strange to relate, the public was immediately thereafter informed th» Social Security meant insurance; it & understandable that the typical Amef' can would not relish the idea of !*" ceiving charily in return for paymei> of forced, inescapable taxes. With the greatly-changed third SO" cial .Security Act of 1939, "the money- back guarantee disappeared and i*5 body has never been found." The te" quirement of actuarial soundness carefully written into the law of 1935 too** wings in 1939, according to Mr- (Continued on page 6"' Facts Forum News, September, 195"
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