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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
File 034
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 034. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/243.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 034. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/243

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 034, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/243.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 034
Transcript course I knew that the Party had other sources of income. During the war I became aware that the Party had an interest in a certain machine plant engaged in war eon- tracts and that it drew revenue from it. I had long known that the Party had an interest in printing ancl lithograph plants, and in stationery and office supplies — shops where all the unions and mass organizations directed their business through office managers who were Party members. Several night clubs were started with the assistance of wealthy political figures snagged by some of the most attractive "cheesecake" in the Party. I used to sympathize vv ith these pretty Communists when some of them rebelled because they said they were not being given sufficient Marxist education. Instead, their time went into calling on men and women of wealth, in an effort to get them to open their pocketbooks. These girls, nearly all of them college graduates, and some of them writers for slick magazines, were mostly from out of town and still had a fresh-faced look and an innocent charm. I noted that after a while they forgot their eager desire for more Marxist education and developed keen competition for private lists of suckers and private telephone numbers. These young women were capable of raising fabulous sums. They raised the first money for the night clubs which have been called Bill Browder's Folly, Bill being Earl's brother. But these night clubs paid off in money ancl in political prestige. They Were also the means of attracting scores of talented young people who got their first chance to perform, and at the same time had the excitement of knowing they were part of a secret movement. 1 he Party boys who had worked on congressional committees, like the Truman committee which investigated the condition of the small businessman, had made valuable contacts for the Party in the business world. They steered the establishment of the Progressive Businessmen's Committee for the election of Roosevelt. Through them the Party had entree into local chambers of commerce and conservative business organizations like the Committee on Economic Development, in which Roy Hudson's wife held an important research job. Party economic researchers, accountants, and lawyers got jobs with various conservative planning groups in Republican and Democratic Party setups and in nonpartisan organizations. The director of much of this activity was William Wiener, head of Century Publishers, who was known as the top financial agent of the Communist movement, ancl also operated a large financial empire. Wiener had a number of financial pools operating to gather in capital from wealthy, middle-class Party people. They maintained olfiees with scores of accountants and attorneys from whom the Communist movement drew reserves. There were doll factories, paint and plastic-manufacturing firms, chemical firms, tourist travel bureaus, import-export companies, textiles and cosmetics, records for young people, theatrical agencies. In 1915 several corporations were established for trade with China. Under direction of Wiener and others, such corporations hired and maintained a different type of Communist, better dressed, better fed, more sophisticated, and much more venomous. The export-import group was especially interesting. I met one man who was making regular flying trips to Czechoslovakia, engaged in the deadly business of selling arms and ammunition, for today the Communist agent engaged in international trade is far more effective than Page 32 the old-type political agitator. That spring 1 worked at my law practice and tried' build a private fife for myself. I outwitted a number * well-laid plans to injure me. I hoped against hope that would be permitted to drift away from the Party. After* a million and more Americans had drifted into and on'' it. But I knew they were not likely to allow anyone W» had reached a position of importance to do so. I had withdrawn from most activity with them, excep that I continued as Party contact for the Party teaebfl groups. Now I was replaced even there, I was not atteH" ing Party meetings. Nevertheless, when I received a noti** 1 decided to go to the state convention held that year< Webster Hall on the East Side. There I found I was' marked person, that people were afraid to be seen sittio vv ith me. As a member of the National Committee I had an o" gation to attend the National Convention of 1948, but decided I had punished myself enough. There was I reason for me to go; there was nothing I could do. Perh*P when that was over, when I was no longer a member' the National Committee, they would drop me entire" Evidently some of the leaders bad thought 1 might 9 to the convention and had planned a means to silence ,tf Just before the convention the discipline commit™ ordered me to appear before it on the ninth floor. I knew I did not have to obey. I was an American ''' zen with the right to be free of coercion. I did not h* to go to Twelfth Street and ride thc dingy elevator to1 ninth floor. I did not have to face the tight-lipped men * women who kept the gates and doors locked against W sion, or meet their scornful eyes. I did not have to go, like an automaton I went. When I left the elevator I went through the long, "■ i corridor into an untidy room. Suddenly I all but laugjl with relief, for there sat three old men — I knew them *J Alexander Trachtenberg, with his little walrus must:"- | and his way of looking down his nose, said nothing -'.' . came in. Pop Mindel, hero of the Communist train' , schools, whose bright brown eyes were usually merry'- J no smile for me. The third was Jim Ford, a Negro lea*1 whose look at me at distant and morose. I greeted them and sat down. I waited for then1 speak, but they sat there in silence until finally I S? uneasy. "Will this take long?" 1 asked Trachtenberg, "How are you feeling?" he asked with no concern " ever in his voice. I hedged. "I've been ill, Comrade Trachtenberg. "But you are all right now?" "Yes," I said. "I guess I'm all right now," "We want to ask you a lew questions." "Here it comes," I thought, and braced myself. And' , I found myself saying inwardly, "Dear God, dear t'1 I with such intensity that it seemed I had spoken al" "We hear you attacked the Cominform," said Trad' ] berg, half-asking, half-accusing me. Then he stated time and place where I had done it. ,-| This I could answer. I explained carefully that ' ,-, criticized the Daily Worker statement which said the J son the Communist Party in America had not joined Cominform was that it would be dangerous to do so. 1 ^ pointed out that this was a false statement and that no would believe it. They listened to my brief explanation. They did n° Facts Forum News. September,
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