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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
File 032
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 032. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/241.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 032. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/241

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 032, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/241.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 032
Transcript wmm letter by Jacques Duclos, published previously in a Communist magazine in France. This letter was to change the whole course of the Communist movement in this country. The letter, which appeared in the World-Telegram in May, 1945, ridiculed the Browder line of unity, his Teheran policy, and charged the American Communists with having betrayed the principles of Marx and Lenin. It branded Browder as a crass "revisionist" of Marxism- Leninism, and called for his removal from office. Immediate confusion ancl hysteria permeated the Party. A palace revolution was taking place at Twelfth Street, with William Z. Foster leading the forces of Marxist fundamentalism. The large corps of job-holders in the Party, frightened, confessed in private and in public meetings that they had been remiss in their duty; there were demonstrations of public self-flagellation that stirred in me feelings of disgust and pity. It was clear that we were now to believe again that imperialism was the last stage of capitalism, that it would inevitably lead to war and the Communist revolution, and that the United States was the worst offender. Again we were to despise our own country as an exploiter of the workers. This was certainly a turn-about-face, a complete repudiation of a policy which [previously] had not only the unanimous support of Communist leadership in the United States, but the open support of the Soviet Union. We had even been told that the Teheran policy had been prepared with the assistance of Ambassador Oumansky, the accredited representative from the USSR to the United States. Today it is obvious that after Stalin had gained diplomatic concessions at Yalta, and after the Bretton Woods and Dumbarton Oaks conferences had placed concealed American Communists in positions of power, world communism did not want the patriotic efforts of Earl Browder and his band of open Communists who longed for participation in American affairs. Only later did I learn that Foster's belated opposition to the Teheran line the year before had been suggested through private channels from abroad, as preparation for the upheaval of 1945. Browder was caught off guard and unprepared. The National Committee met for three days; meetings began early, lasted late; excoriated Browder. I was named to serve on a temporary committee of thirteen to interview members, estimate the extent of their revisionist errors, and recommend to tbe National Convention those who should be dropped and those who should be retained. IyIy work on that committee I shall never forget. The procedure was fascinating, fantastic - thc nearest thing to purge trials I have ever seen. One by one thc leaders appeared before this committee. We waited for them to speak. Men showed remorse for having offended or betrayed the working class. They tried desperately to prove that they themselves were of that working class, had no bourgeois background, were unspoiled by bourgeois education. They talked of Browder as if he were a bourgeois Satan who had lured them into error. Now they grieved over their mistakes and unctuously pledged that they would study Marx-Lenin-Stalin carefully, and never betray tbe working class again. It was weird to see tall, raw-boned Roy Hudson (from the Central Committee, ancl Browder's labor specialist) pick and choose his words with pathetic care, to hear him plead, as if it were a boast, that all he had was a third- Page 30 grade education and that he came from a poverty-strickiPThe d( background. It was weird to hear Robert Thompson. prominent Communist leader, talk about his proletarian father and mother. As I listened to this insistence on poverty and lack » Do Party formal education as the qualifications for admission to th* Party, I turned to Alexander Trachtenberg, one of tin Committee. "I don't think I belong here," I said. "My father becafl a successful businessman and we owned a house and' went to college." Trachtenberg, himself a well-educated man, caught tb- irony. He stroked his walrus mustache and said reassuring ly: "Don't worry about that. Remember Stalin studied '. be a priest and Lenin came from a well-to-do family an*1 studied to be a lawyer. You must be a proletarian "' identify yourself with the proletariat. That's all." As the comrades continued to come in before the eflfl ining committee the thought came to me that there V* not one real worker among them. Foster, though he affedj ed the khaki shirt of a workman, hadn't done a stroke work in a long time. He had been sitting in little room' and planning revolutions and conniving for power «* twenty-five years. Thompson and Gil Green had graduate from school right into the Young Communist Leagu* Thompson bad gone to Spain as a commissar of the Lincol" Brigade and when he returned he worked for the Faff' and Gil became a functionary at an early age. That was the pattern of these American rcvolutionari** and I felt as I looked at them that they really could kno" little about the ordinary worker. At the end of June the Emergency Convention met. Tl* debate and argument that went on I can compare only'^ conversation in a nightmare. Confusion ancl universal s"! picion reigned. Close friends became enemies. l-,,,.j cliques sprang up everywhere. Browder appeared bri('"1 at the convention to address it. He was most conciliate saying he approved the establishing of a new line. If promised to cooperate. When he finished, there was sc» tered applause in which I joined. I was sitting at a tab*, with Israel Amter, a Party leader, and I caught bis be**'! black eyes fixed on me. Months later he brought me up ° charges of having applauded Browder. The convention voted to dissolve the Communist P<"' | cal Association and to re-establish the Communist Pa-^j It voted to rededicate itself to its revolutionary task ' establishing a Soviet America. It voted to intensify ,-'"rX'5J Leninist education. It voted to oust Browder as leader- voted to return to the use of the word "comrade." V* I me, I became allergic to that word. I had seen too m***1' uncomradely acts. , When Browder left for Moscow with a Soviet vis' hoped a change would come on his return. So I held .' i Strange as it seems, the last illusion to die in me was' . illusion about the Soviet Union. I did not know then "'',} the new line was made in Moscow. Faith in the SoV Union was deeply etched. ■v*-!! I ran into conflict after conflict with Thompson. He *i Moscow-trained, morose, and unstable. He surrouflj himself with strong-arm men and moved in swiftly destroy anyone who thwarted him. As 1945 dragged into spring, 1946, it was clear »*J William Z. Foster ancl Eugene Dennis had been ordff-t to take over the Party but did not know what to do wit-1 Facts Forum News, September, 1™
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