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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
File 031
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 031. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/240.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 031. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/240

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 031, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/240.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 031
Transcript The, the tl", Pol- | ,i-n>"| on" i Party dissolved itself and then by another resolution the delegates re-estabhshed it under the name of the Communist Political Association, which brought me to its top leadership. I was now supposed to be part of the inner circle. The new change of name puzzled many both in and out °f the Party. I knew that one immediate reason was to lay *he basis for leadership of the Communists for the re-elect-on of Roosevelt, since Earl Browder was the first to call Publicly for his re-election to a fourth term. I also knew •hat the new name had a less ominous sound to American ears. Even so, it had been a drastic thing to do. Those who thought they knew the reason explained it to me thus: The current line in world communism was low based on the Roosevelt pledge to the Soviet Union °' mutual coexistence and continued postwar Soviet- ■Wrican unity. If that pledge were kept and if the march to World Communist control could be achieved by a diplomatic unity arising out of official Soviet-American rela- ™ns, then there would be no need of a militant class- ^■"oggle party. The Communist Political Association would O-^ome a sort of Fabian Society, doing research and en- °aged in promoting social, economic, and political ideas o direct America's development into a full-fledged Social- lst nation. *Se convention over, we turned to the most important 'em on the Party's agenda, the re-election of President Roosevelt for a fourth term. For this end the National ^-"nmittee met immediately after the convention. My duties were various. I continued to exercise control , ver the Communist teachers. I bad been able to lay the ^-sis for affiliation of the Teachers Union with the NEA. pS an official member of the New York State Board of the arty and on the state committee, I was second to Gil reen in charge of political campaigns. I was assigned I^0 immediate tasks: the defeat of Hamilton Fish in the 'wenty-ninth Congressional District and the building of a %v York division of the progressive farmers and business- "■en for re-election of Roosevelt. In this election the Communists served as the major co-ordinating factor. New York, because of its large voting power, was the *rective center of the campaign. Press releases from New ISk enlarged on by the leading New York papers, set the /ne for hundreds of newspapers and radio stations in the "Werland. pV the success of this election the American Labor arty moved into high gear. The New Liberal Party, J&m'zed bv Alex Rose and David Dubinsky, along xvith ^°rge Counts and John Cbilds, also played an important °'e- This latter group differentiated itself from tbe Com- J^-ists and often attacked them. In reply the Communists lacked them, even though they were on the same side 11 the election campaign. It was fascinating to see how ^si*v the Party personnel acclimated itself to its new role . Pulling all forces together. They rubbed elbows with j^t-Xt leaders, with underworld characters, and with old- e Political bosses. While I was in active work I was reasonably happy, but M„ and Roosevelt re-elected, I , *n the campaign was over Nd myself depressed. One reason was a peculiar strug- | for power which I saw emerging. Disputes began to j?VeIop between open and concealed Communists. These ^Putes were resolved by Browder himself, if necessary, "<* always in favor of the concealed members. I felt a VCfs Forum News, September, 1956 ,'nti: WORLD I'll. Building owned by the Communist Party, ot 35 East Twelfth Street, New York City. First floor: Workers' Bookshop and entrance to elevators. Second floor, leased to other business. Third floor; New York County Communists. Fourth floor: storage rooms of International Publishers, the Communist book-publishing firm headed by Comrade Trachtenberg. Fifth floor: New York State Communists. Sixth floor: Jewish Commission, and offices of Yiddish paper, the "Freiheit." Seventh and eighth floors, "Doily Worker." Ninth floor: Headquarters ol the Communist Party, U.S.A. grow ing competition between these groups, and I wanted to run away from it. I worked for a while with the Communist Youth who were just starting a campaign in favor of universal military training. This campaign did not seem to fit in with the Teheran perspective for a long-term peace, nor with the happy optimism that was promoted when tbe Nazi armies were broken and peace seemed near. All straws in the wind pointed to ultimate state control of the people. When the Yalta conference bad ended, the Communists prepared to support the United Nations Charter which was to be adopted at the San Francisco conference to be held in May ancl June, 1945. The two campaigns wen- geared to two different purposes: the need to control the people in the postwar period, and the need to build a world-wide machine to preserve peace. The Communist leaders were not envisioning a peace mechanism without armies. JlSy April, 1945, there was evidence of trouble in the Communist Party. Two foreigners appeared in our midst, recently come from Italy: Berti and Donnini, a smooth, attractive pair. They represented the international Communist movement and it was clear that Browder's approach to the national problem was in disfavor with some sections of world communism. These two men were responsible for translating and giving to the Scripps-Howard press a Page 29
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