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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
File 030
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 030. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/239.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 030. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/239

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 030, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/239.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 030
Transcript n^— L of orders by the bureaucrats (the skeleton staff of which stands ready to take over when revolution comes to pass). The Class Room Teachers had two tasks: to convert teachers to a revolutionary approach to problems, and to recruit members for the Communist Party. It became clear that before long the Teachers Union, including the Class Room Teachers, would be controlled by the Reds. 1 Dm not become a Communist overnight. It came a little at a time. I had been conditioned by my education and association to accept this materialistic philosophy. Now came new reasons for acceptance: I was grateful for Communist support in the struggles for improved economic conditions of the Instructors Association. I admired the selfless dedication of many who belonged to the Party. I was not interested in long-range Party objectives but I did welcome their assistance on immediate issues. I respected the way they fought for tbe forgotten man. So I did not argue about the "dictatorship of the proletariat" or its implications. I was not the only American who thought one could go along with the good things the Communists did and then reject their objectives. It was a naive idea and many of us were naive. I learned over the years that if you stumbled from weariness they simply marched over you. I became the tool of a secret, well-organized world power. I learned that Lenin held in contempt unions interested only in economic betterment of workers; that unions which followed a reformist policy were guilty of "economism"; that trade unions are useful only when they win workers' acceptance of revolution. I saw senseless strikes called and prolonged. Communists have no hesitation about bringing unknown people forward into leadership — the more callow or ill- equipped the better, since they vvill be more easily guided by the Party. If tactics change, they drop them quickly. The Communist Party used the emotional appeal of anti-fascism to bring people into acceptance of communism, by posing fascism and communism as alternatives. Some of the same forces which gave Hitler his start also started Lenin and his staff of revolutionaries to St. Petersburg to begin the Revolution which was to result in the Soviet totalitarian state. I, myself, swallowed the Party's lies in the Spanish Civil War. The Communist publicists took for their own the pleasant word of Loyalist and called all who opposed them "Franco-Fascists." This confused many. jt_iARL Browder, as chief of the Communist Party, emphasized the importance of relying on Stalin who was building socialism in Russia, and only on Stalin because of his shrewdness in dealing with all, even with enemies of the working class, such as English and American capitalists. Attending conventions took much of my time. No convention of teachers in the United States went unnoticed by the Communist Party. Particular attention was given to pushing federal aid to the public school program. Quiet Albeit Blumberg from Johns Hopkins University was the shrewdest Communist agent in the American Federation of Teachers. There is no doubt that Earl Browder was close to the seats of world power. The men who paid their hundred- dollar admissions and contributed thus to school funds became part of the group which Earl Browder was to call "progressive businessmen," meaning those willing to go Page 28 along with an international program of communism. Th' lure was expanded profits from trade with the Soviet. TW price paid was unimportant to these well-fed, well-heer men, who felt the world was their oyster. The price Wl respectability for communism at home and leadership ° the Soviets abroad. I gave up my Hunter College work; I felt I could no1 serve two masters. I did not see communism as a conspi' acy; I regarded it as a philosophy of life which glorified the "little people." My father died in 1939, my mother in 1941. My husband bad obtained a divorce; shortly thereafter I heard he r? married. These events led me to throw myself complete', into my work for the Party. By January, 1944, I was firmly established at Party head' quarters on the ninth floor of the building owned by "* Party at 35 East Twelfth Street. There I organized * legislative program of the Party; but, more important st'1, I supervised the legislative work of the unions, chiefly •'" unions of government workers on a state, local, and n3' tional level, of the mass organizations of women, ancl ° the youth organizations. . All over the building there was a noticeable feeling °. excitement and optimism. Browder's book, Victory """ After, placed Communist participation in the mainstre** of American life. At a state board meeting Gil Green, N-** York State chairman of the Communist Party, gave a *-' on the new era at hand, and startled us with perspectiw new to those who been brought up on Lenin's thesis tn* imperialism is the last stage of capitalism. Gil now s£" that the age of imperialism had come to an end, '''! Teheran had canceled out Munich, and that Soviet-Amf' can unity would continue indefinitely after the war. 1 , gether, he added, the United States and the Soviet v.'""1'" solve the world's colonial problems and indeed all on' world problems. 1 HROUGH December, 1943, we at headquarters had he*' nothing but Teheran. What had happened at that c(in'e ence was by no means clear to us. We did know u\ . Browder was writing another book dealing with it. ' , also knew that Teheran was now the password, that mean maximum cooperation of Communists with , I groups and all classes. The artists and writers wh lowed the Communists began to interpret Teheran il work. For every activity Teheran was the key. H"-"|l murals commemorated it as well as cafe-society songs a i political skits. For some time this line brought a pleas-' .1 sense of security, but by January we heard rumbling8 | trouble from the ninth floor as they prepared for l coming Party convention. .fl Dissension had arisen among the leaders. Sam Dai ey'. Party- organizer from California, disagreed with the P posed change of Party line and Gil announced the P". buro decision to expel Darcy. A vote was taken supper*1 the action of the national Politburo. Like all votes in L Communist Party, it was unanimous. I was startled by | anger displayed against this man. Only a few days bet , / they had all called him "comrade." With the expulsio", the dissident Darcy, peace reigned again. We were c°" j dent of the Party's importance in the current Amefl j scene. The convention that year was held at Riverside I'l-'/'1' hotel on West Seventy-second Street. The Party mad" J worked with planned precision. The American Coni'i""' ti"-, Facts Foiu-m News, September.
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