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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
File 029
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 029. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/238.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 029. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/238

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 029, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/238.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 029
Transcript , 1 w rl",r icnced. M as an Urn not ice"?' because » led to sett' i which 1^ :eptive, )*• e cxanii"11' ■xaminatio" college ai*- wanted I wanted I capacity 1 ■ry walk I cas on ** . n Dodd. Universe I politics h»d en. as aoM onal wor" (Icspiri"1'1 : zation pirituah/'"1 ' Commun'5' "'fleet the character of the people. I lie simplest shopgirl poked like one of Raphael's models. I Was continually amazed to see the diversity and the beauty of the past culture of the cities of Italy. Venice *as unlike Florence. Verona and Bologna were a world "Part from Rome. In this day, when there is so much talk *boiit mass culture and so many worship, or are frightened '"to, an acceptance of the idea of world government, I 'ook back to the joy I had in the past culture of these little "ty-stalis and wonder if the art and architecture of our "•ty will ever achieve the beauty of that of earlier times. Beatrice and I went to Paris, where I picked up my mail « the American Express office. Ruth fa classmate] bad Cabled, "You passed both parts of the bar exam." My "•Other and father wrote, "Come home. We are lonely Without you." V-^ the boat returning home I met a group of New York ;;'ty schoolteachers, who told me they belonged to the faclieis Union. I promised to join as an evidence of mv JTUingness to throw in my lot with the working class, even ""'ugh I did not think the Union could be of help to me fctsonally. hi New York I went to meetings of the Teachers Union. "ere was much strife between groups seeking control. , did not see why intelligent adults should struggle so ''"'d to control an organization which was in numbers '"•'Il and insignificant. I was dumfounded to find distin- sOished professors such as John Dewey and George Counts "volvcd in the controversy. Later, when I understood ''it-Wing politics, I became aware of the significance of **s beachhead. The collapse of the stock market did not immediately "'et my laniily for we had no money invested in stocks lr bonds. Therefore it was not difficult for me to leave my )st -it Hunter College in 1930 to serve a clerkship for my . Jnission to the New York Bar. I worked at a nominal hedule - ladoni"1' I ,, was >"1 Ml'"'y in the office of Howard Hilton Spelhnan. who was •Excellent lawyer and was writing several texts on corpo- '•'■''ni law. p saw a great deal of John Dodd whom I had met in '"'"pc. John's family lived in Floyd County, Georgia. "ne morning in late September, John and 1 were inar- <('- I knew how devoted he was to the South and its ,°"ple. We went to visit his home. I had never been South th, ° 0rked jf themselves. The women worked as bard as the "lei i. People. Never after that Erst visit did I read morbid those *>*! | ,o stand*'' I was a le";" award"'" j '0re. John's people were not plantation owners nor did ey have sharecroppers. They owned a lot of land and 0rkc-d it themselves. The women worked as bard as the .i "• I was struck by the independence and stiirdiness of )ple. Never after that first visit did I read morbid ie '"'"-'I u re on the South without a sense of resentment at e twisted picture it gave of a section which has great ., etvoirs of strength, based not on material wealth but on ■»ir>»__„.__ _r li integrity of its people , ,y 1932 mv family felt tin 'art,,.. , . • of the depression. My . *-er's business had come to a standstill. John, too, was (06etinK financial difficulties. I therefore decided to return e, mate'"-;! Practi.-'1 -en fascial :ul svin-'" h-hcate '■'' seenici A |. | '" '■■>• post at Hunter College. "as stunned by the Fur) of the impact of the depres- <>n my family and (hose around me. I watched the P*ol pal,'-, pinched laces of people who stood before the s lit cl, Si ."S(d doors of the Bowery Savings Bank on Forty-second ■' ('''t- The) reminded me of the anxious faces I had seen E Hamburg and Berlin a few years before. I saw men mber. °)vi"iisly once in good circumstances line Up around the b I obi Ivl Nl ws. September. 1956 block for soup and coffee at mission houses. I saw them furtively pick up cigaret butts from the streets. I had not been back at Hunter long before I found myself involved in discussions on the economic problems of the staff below professorial ranks. Many instructors and other staff members were underpaid and had no security of tenure or promotion. We organized the Hunter College Instructors Association and I became one of tbe leading forces in it. The election in 1932 of Fiorello LaGuardia as mayor was to New York City what the Roosevelt administration was to the country. The recognition in 19-33 in Washington of the USSR brought a tremendous change in the activities of the Communists on our college campus. Recognition brought respectability; it led to the organization of such groups as Friends of the Soviet Union, which was led bv engineers and social workers and which soon extended to the world ol art and science and to education in general. One hears a great deal about the influence of teachers on their students. During this early period of communistic influence on the campus, Hunter students and City College students had a much greater effect on their teachers. Almost overnight and seemingly from nowhere organization arose. Groups of the Young Communist League and the League for Industrial Democracy — an organization originating in England among the Fabians — appeared in our midst, small dedicated bands of young people. This soon led to mass groups. I was very conscious of one thing: These organizations were not springing up spontaneously; some creating group w as behind them. But the student answer was spontaneous, immediate. In the early thirties, people who were in unorthodox movements, or who had lost their ties with society, were pulled along bv the cyclonic fury of the Communist movement. Without a positive program of their own, they were drawn into thc well-integrated, well-financed move- men! which was suddenly legalized with the American recognition of the Soviet Union. In preparing a country for revolution, the Communist Party tries to enlist the masses, the unattached people; they have less to lose and are first to capitulate to organized excitement. Many who were caught up in the Party, either from need or from desire, included the unemployed, the fighters against fascism, the foreign-born, the racial and religious minorities. Even today I can understand tbe at traction it had for intellectual proletariat. It was as if a great family welcomed them as members. I often marveled at the sacrifices made by these Communist Party members. In my classes at Hunter were Young Communist Leaguers who would go without lunch to buy paper and ink and other items for propaganda leaflets. Their emaciated faces made my heart ache. Their half-hearted participation in their studies, their frequent cutting of classes, their sacrifice of academic standing to fulfill some task assigned, were sad to see. I saw college girls exploited by cold Party backs. Thev were expendable — in their places would come other wide-eyed, eager young people with a desire for sacrifice. It was an infectious thing, this comradeship; it often helped in dire need such as "rent parties," where Communists gathered money to pay the rent lor some comrade. Personal aid did much to overcome the doctrinaire aridity Page 27
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